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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: C + P in Classroom

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  • Scott Rubel
    Those are great shots. Reminds me of the ones I pulled off and sold on e-bay years ago. I have seen another method of protecting students hands. Put an eye
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 10, 2010
      Those are great shots. Reminds me of the ones I pulled off and sold on e-bay years ago.

      I have seen another method of protecting students' hands. Put an eye bold in the ceiling and run a rope with a loop in it. It's good if there is a spring involved, too. Make the student feed the press with the feed hand through the loop and make sure it's just long enough to keep a hand from diving into the danger zone. Of course nobody will like to work this way, but it seems a little less annoying than fighting with the guard pushing your hand up.

      --Scott

      On Aug 10, 2010, at 10:07 AM, Lance Williams wrote:



      The only other safety item is a platen guard.  But, I don't know where you would get one today except off a scrapped press ( or possibly Dave Churchman in Indianapolis??)  I posted pictures of the platen guards on both our 8x12 NS and our 10x15 Craftsman to the photos section of the PPLetterpress Yahoo group a few years ago.  Link here:
       
       
      - Lance Williams
      Williams Stationery Co.
      Camden, New York
      APA #785
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: 8/10/2010 12:57:33 PM
      Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: C + P in Classroom

      There is a flywheel guard in place covering both the flywheel and gears. We haven't moved it yet, but we did rewire the motor to test everything. The motor works, but needs refurbished — is there something we should have done to it, regardless of whether we keep it or sell it, to improve safety? Thank you all for your generous advice, links, and information! This discussion has been valuable.




    • Lance Williams
      In 30+ years of working with these two presses, I have never fought with the platen guards. They clear the platen very quickly after impression, well before
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 10, 2010
        In 30+ years of working with these two presses, I have never "fought" with the platen guards.  They clear the platen very quickly after impression, well before the platen is fully open for feed/delivery, and don't start to lift until the platen starts to rotate for impression.
         
        The very few times I have come in contact with the platen guard during feeding, I would have to say it's a automatic and instinctive reaction to just pull your hand back away from the press at the slightest little touch of the guard at the bottom of your wrist....  I don't think I would ever operate a hand fed press without one, personally....
         
        - Lance Williams
        Williams Stationery Co.
        Camden, New York
        APA #785
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: 8/10/2010 1:15:12 PM
        Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: C + P in Classroom

        Those are great shots. Reminds me of the ones I pulled off and sold on e-bay years ago.

        I have seen another method of protecting students' hands. Put an eye bold in the ceiling and run a rope with a loop in it. It's good if there is a spring involved, too. Make the student feed the press with the feed hand through the loop and make sure it's just long enough to keep a hand from diving into the danger zone. Of course nobody will like to work this way, but it seems a little less annoying than fighting with the guard pushing your hand up.

        --Scott

        On Aug 10, 2010, at 10:07 AM, Lance Williams wrote:



        The only other safety item is a platen guard.  But, I don't know where you would get one today except off a scrapped press ( or possibly Dave Churchman in Indianapolis??)  I posted pictures of the platen guards on both our 8x12 NS and our 10x15 Craftsman to the photos section of the PPLetterpress Yahoo group a few years ago.  Link here:
         
         
        - Lance Williams
        Williams Stationery Co.
        Camden, New York
        APA #785
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: 8/10/2010 12:57:33 PM
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: C + P in Classroom

        There is a flywheel guard in place covering both the flywheel and gears. We haven't moved it yet, but we did rewire the motor to test everything. The motor works, but needs refurbished � is there something we should have done to it, regardless of whether we keep it or sell it, to improve safety? Thank you all for your generous advice, links, and information! This discussion has been valuable.




      • typetom@aol.com
        Decent training and systematic practice should eliminate the need to live in fear of the C&P platen. The press is designed with a pause in the full open
        Message 3 of 19 , Aug 10, 2010
          Decent training and systematic practice should eliminate the need to live in fear of the C&P platen. The press is designed with a pause in the full open position so there is time to feed the paper; the platen moves away from you so there is a clear signal to get your hands out of the way. Only by following mis-fed paper down into the press or some odd behavior out of the normal pattern will make danger.
           
          Of course this assumes the speed of the motor can be controlled so a comfortable pattern is possible; and it assumes the operator can avoid dangerous situations when oiling and when adjusting parts that can move - experience and knowledge of the motions of the press should be part of the training. Gear covers, a treadle that allows operator control of the speed, and considerable practice with the throw-off are good ideas. Close observation by an instructor is important. Training needs to stress awareness of patterns of movement and the importance of routine practices (for safety but also for ergonomics, and for protection of the type and the equipment as well).
           
          One true danger spot: the feed table needs to be mounted back far enough to allow your hand to hold onto its front edge when the platen is fully open. Many presses have the feed table too far forward and eventually a crushed hand is inevitable.
           
          One major repair danger: the long springs in the roller side arms are under enormous pressure and should not be disassembled without great caution. Also, the bed and the gears can move unexpectedly if the press is partially disassembled, so should be secured in the process.
           
          26 years continuous work on my 10x15 C&P, with many visitors and interns in my shop, no injuries. I consider the guillotine lever paper cutter much more dangerous, and I have been pinched several times by a Kelsey and other small tabletop presses, never by the 10x15 platen.
           
          My recommendation is to include such a press in school training programs. Training solely on a Vandercook may not require the exacting justification and lock-up that is essential on a platen, where the form must be lifted. Adjustments and packing and positioning on a platen teach perspectives and strategies that bring an understanding of the mechanics of printing which might often seem effortless on the Vandercook. And certain kinds of production are much more appropriate for a platen press, while students who have learned only on a flatbed cylinder press try to acquire and use the wrong equipment because it is more comfortable for them - they need to be comfortable with both kinds of presses. 
           
          Best wishes, Tom
           
          Tom Parson/ Now It's Up To You
          157 S Logan, Denver CO 80209
          (303) 777-8951 - home & letterpress printshop
          (720) 480-5358 - cranky cellphone
          typetom@...
          www.froglok.com/typetom (way out of date website!)




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