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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re:what is makeready?

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  • Peter Fraterdeus
    Eric, thanks for your clear and calm prose ;-) Your description is correct. The total thickness of the packing being . 040 IIRC. Of course that would be for a
    Message 1 of 35 , Jun 22, 2010
      Eric, thanks for your clear and calm prose ;-)

      Your description is correct. The total thickness of the packing being .
      040" IIRC. Of course that would be for a kiss impression. Any excess
      beyond that would of course end up compressed into the paper's
      thickness, a perfectly acceptable result, if intended!

      If our heavy imprinter has been using Crane Lettra 600gsm, then he may
      very well be able to make a perfect kiss impression without any
      packing behind the sheet, as Lettra 600 is exactly .040 caliper (again
      if I remember correctly).

      However, as he's trying to get a deep impression, he's probably got
      the impression dialed way up, which is causing the problem described.

      Excess packing will cause heavier impression at the bottom of the form
      (ie, the lower edge of the chase where it fits into the press bed),
      since due to the clamshell-like hinging of the platen, the bottom edge
      does not travel as far than the top of the platen before coming into
      parallel with the bed.

      If there's too much packing, the lower edge makes contact before the
      top edge. As the book says, remove some packing and increase the
      "impression" (ie turn the impression to a higher number, which moves
      the entire platen assembly closer to the bed at the moment of
      parallel.) (Of course on a C&P, et al, the same thing is true, except
      that there's no easy way to change the distance of the platen from the
      bed)

      When there's no packing at all, the opposite would be true, as the
      impression is increased by cranking the "dial" on the "throwoff" lever
      (sorry can't remember Heidelberg's terms here) then eventually the top
      of the platen will come closer to the bed when the press is fully
      closed. Again, out of parallel at the moment of impression.

      Side to side issues, if all else is equal (roller height in
      particular) can't be adjusted except by makeready or very subtle
      underlay of the form.

      I'd guess that unequal impression from side to side (on a perfectly
      flat form with no spring etc etc) could only be evidence of bearing
      problems, but I'm no expert on the inner workings of the Windmill

      Cheers!

      peter


      On 22 Jun 2010, at 10:59 AM, Eric wrote:

      >
      >
      > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David Goodrich"
      > <dgoodrich@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> Astounded as we all are that Heavyimpression has not heard the term
      >> "makeready," no one has offered a thing to help fixing his or her
      >> problem.
      >>
      >> If the image is darker on one side, it could be the result of a
      >> number of problems. First, is the darkness the result of a heavier
      >> impression on that side? If you can't be sure, print with no ink
      >> and compare the impressions.
      >>
      > As I already mentioned, and hoped a platen Heidelberger would
      > elaborate, it is specific to the design of the Windmill that packing
      > and paper must be at a certain total thickness. The press has an
      > overall impression adjustment, and if packing is insufficient, I
      > think impression will hit harder at top, and excess packing will
      > cause heavier impression at bottom. Or maybe the opposite, please
      > somebody who has knowledge, explain.
      > That's top to bottom. If the problem is side to side, something else
      > is happening. Such details help in diagnosis.
      > --Eric Holub, SF
      >

      Peter Fraterdeus
      Exquisite letterpress takes time™
      http://slowprint.com/

      IdeasWords : Idea Swords
      Communication Strategy
      Semiotx.com @ideaswords
    • Halton
      Hello Heavyimpressions Making a form and press ready to print starts with proper lock-up. Be sure the surface is dead flat . . . place empty chase on surface
      Message 35 of 35 , Jun 23, 2010
        Hello Heavyimpressions
        Making a form and press ready to print starts with proper lock-up. Be sure the surface is dead flat . . . place empty chase on surface and press down on corners . . . no movement! Now with form and furniture in chase with quoins, tighten the quoin(s) in long direction, and push the corners again to see it chase lifted . . . slacken long and tighten the short and press corners again . . . with quoins just snug in both directions plane form to even it and then tighten all quoins . . . now press the 4 corners again and hopefully all is flat. If there a little raise observed, try turning large pieces of furniture upside down
        and recheck. Lastly, place chase edge on handle of quoin key and check that all parts in chase are tight.
        There is slot on right hand side guide of delivery table of Heidelberg to check packing . . . with packing matching that thickness the impression should be parallel.
        Joe
        --- On Tue, 6/22/10, okintertype <spthompson@...> wrote:

        > From: okintertype <spthompson@...>
        > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re:what is makeready?
        > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Tuesday, June 22, 2010, 6:44 PM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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        >  
        >
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        >
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        >
        > I am certainly no expert on the Windmill.
        > I've only run about three jobs on it. But I do believe
        > the roller height is adjustable, if you are talking about
        > the impression of the roller on the type. And each side is
        > adjustable individually. May be part of his problem.
        >
        > Stan
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com,
        > Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Eric, thanks for your clear and calm prose ;-)
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Your description is correct. The total thickness of
        > the packing being .
        >
        > > 040" IIRC. Of course that would be for a kiss
        > impression. Any excess
        >
        > > beyond that would of course end up compressed into the
        > paper's
        >
        > > thickness, a perfectly acceptable result, if
        > intended!
        >
        > >
        >
        > > If our heavy imprinter has been using Crane Lettra
        > 600gsm, then he may
        >
        > > very well be able to make a perfect kiss impression
        > without any
        >
        > > packing behind the sheet, as Lettra 600 is exactly
        > .040 caliper (again
        >
        > > if I remember correctly).
        >
        > >
        >
        > > However, as he's trying to get a deep impression,
        > he's probably got
        >
        > > the impression dialed way up, which is causing the
        > problem described.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Excess packing will cause heavier impression at the
        > bottom of the form
        >
        > > (ie, the lower edge of the chase where it fits into
        > the press bed),
        >
        > > since due to the clamshell-like hinging of the platen,
        > the bottom edge
        >
        > > does not travel as far than the top of the platen
        > before coming into
        >
        > > parallel with the bed.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > If there's too much packing, the lower edge makes
        > contact before the
        >
        > > top edge. As the book says, remove some packing and
        > increase the
        >
        > > "impression" (ie turn the impression to a
        > higher number, which moves
        >
        > > the entire platen assembly closer to the bed at the
        > moment of
        >
        > > parallel.) (Of course on a C&P, et al, the same
        > thing is true, except
        >
        > > that there's no easy way to change the distance of
        > the platen from the
        >
        > > bed)
        >
        > >
        >
        > > When there's no packing at all, the opposite would
        > be true, as the
        >
        > > impression is increased by cranking the
        > "dial" on the "throwoff" lever
        >
        > > (sorry can't remember Heidelberg's terms here)
        > then eventually the top
        >
        > > of the platen will come closer to the bed when the
        > press is fully
        >
        > > closed. Again, out of parallel at the moment of
        > impression.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Side to side issues, if all else is equal (roller
        > height in
        >
        > > particular) can't be adjusted except by makeready
        > or very subtle
        >
        > > underlay of the form.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > I'd guess that unequal impression from side to
        > side (on a perfectly
        >
        > > flat form with no spring etc etc) could only be
        > evidence of bearing
        >
        > > problems, but I'm no expert on the inner workings
        > of the Windmill
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Cheers!
        >
        > >
        >
        > > peter
        >
        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > > On 22 Jun 2010, at 10:59 AM, Eric wrote:
        >
        > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com,
        > "David Goodrich"
        >
        > > > <dgoodrich@> wrote:
        >
        > > >>
        >
        > > >> Astounded as we all are that Heavyimpression
        > has not heard the term
        >
        > > >> "makeready," no one has offered a
        > thing to help fixing his or her
        >
        > > >> problem.
        >
        > > >>
        >
        > > >> If the image is darker on one side, it could
        > be the result of a
        >
        > > >> number of problems. First, is the darkness
        > the result of a heavier
        >
        > > >> impression on that side? If you can't be
        > sure, print with no ink
        >
        > > >> and compare the impressions.
        >
        > > >>
        >
        > > > As I already mentioned, and hoped a platen
        > Heidelberger would
        >
        > > > elaborate, it is specific to the design of the
        > Windmill that packing
        >
        > > > and paper must be at a certain total thickness.
        > The press has an
        >
        > > > overall impression adjustment, and if packing is
        > insufficient, I
        >
        > > > think impression will hit harder at top, and
        > excess packing will
        >
        > > > cause heavier impression at bottom. Or maybe the
        > opposite, please
        >
        > > > somebody who has knowledge, explain.
        >
        > > > That's top to bottom. If the problem is side
        > to side, something else
        >
        > > > is happening. Such details help in diagnosis.
        >
        > > > --Eric Holub, SF
        >
        > > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Peter Fraterdeus
        >
        > > Exquisite letterpress takes time™
        >
        > > http://slowprint.com/
        >
        > >
        >
        > > IdeasWords : Idea Swords
        >
        > > Communication Strategy
        >
        > > Semiotx.com @ideaswords
        >
        > >
        >
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