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Re: [PPLetterpress] Industries still producing typographic inks?

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  • Matt Kelsey
    Fabio, In addition to the suggestions that have been made, you can also use inks formulated for offset printing that should be readily available in Italy,
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 16 1:46 PM
      Fabio,

      In addition to the suggestions that have been made, you can also use inks formulated for offset printing that should be readily available in Italy, either oil-based or rubber-based inks.

      I believe that "tipografia" is an Italian term referring to letterpress printing, correct? So by "typographic inks" you mean letterpress inks, I assume. Most ink manufacturers no longer make "letterpress ink", so it's a matter of trying other inks that are available and finding what works to your liking.

      Matt Kelsey

      On Wed, Jun 16, 2010 at 3:55 AM, i_goonies <neroinferno@...> wrote:
       

      Hello,
      I can't find in Italy industries producing still typographic inks...can you help me? I can buy also from Europe or USA.

      Thanks,
      Fabio

    • Incline Press
      Fabio, Oil based inks from the Dutch Van Son Company are easily available throughout Europe, and likewise German Hostmann-Steinberg inks. I can supply
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 16 2:00 PM
        Re: [PPLetterpress] Industries still producing typographic inks? Fabio,

        Oil based inks from the Dutch Van Son Company are easily available throughout Europe, and likewise German Hostmann-Steinberg inks.
        I can supply addresses if you require them, but you can get them on-line from the web sites. I use both.

        Regards,


        Graham Moss
        Incline Press
        36 Bow Street
        Oldham OL1 1SJ  England

        http://www.inclinepress.com






      • author50401
        Along with VanSon (whose oil-based inks I currently use), I would recommend finding an Italian distributor for Jänecke+Schneemann Printing Inks of Hanover,
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 17 8:06 AM
          Along with VanSon (whose oil-based inks I currently use), I would recommend finding an Italian distributor for Jänecke+Schneemann Printing Inks of Hanover, Germany. I used their inks for many years as recommended by one of my college instructors, but my source dried up and I wasn't able to locate a distributor who could order in small quantities for me. Perhaps there are more distributors in Italy.

          They produce some excellent inks and will have familiarity with what you will need for letterpress printing. The inks were highly pigmented and produced a very snappy image. I note on their web site they now have an ink line for offset litho which is termed "High Body" inks. The characteristics listed would be great for letterpress it seems to me.

          John Henry
          Cedar Creek Press


          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Incline Press <books.inclinepress@...> wrote:
          >
          > Fabio,
          >
          > Oil based inks from the Dutch Van Son Company are easily available
          > throughout Europe, and likewise German Hostmann-Steinberg inks.
          > I can supply addresses if you require them, but you can get them on-line
          > from the web sites. I use both.
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          >
          > Graham Moss
          > Incline Press
          > 36 Bow Street
          > Oldham OL1 1SJ England
          >
          > http://www.inclinepress.com
          >
        • i_goonies
          Hello! thank you all for the replies. Like Matt Kelsey said, I meant letterpress inks , because in Italy the word tipografia means letterpress . I was
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 17 11:41 PM
            Hello!
            thank you all for the replies.

            Like Matt Kelsey said, I meant "letterpress inks", because in Italy the word "tipografia" means "letterpress".

            I was asking for letterpress inks, and exactly if there are industries that still produces original letterpress inks.

            In Italy I can readily find offset inks, and I've read others printers with a Heidelberg "Windmill" uses offset inks, but I was looking inks similar to the old letterpress inks.

            I was wondering whether I can use relief inks used in "calcografia" (relief printing) for letterpress. I've read these inks has a pigment rate of 80%, the rest is oil, indee the letterpress inks have got a pigment rate of 20%. This means I must add 4 parts of oil to achieve the 20% pigment's rate.

            In this way I'll use original relief inks of the past, but converted to letterpress printing.

            What do you think?

            Thanks you all!
            Fabio



            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "author50401" <JohnH@...> wrote:
            >
            > Along with VanSon (whose oil-based inks I currently use), I would recommend finding an Italian distributor for Jänecke+Schneemann Printing Inks of Hanover, Germany. I used their inks for many years as recommended by one of my college instructors, but my source dried up and I wasn't able to locate a distributor who could order in small quantities for me. Perhaps there are more distributors in Italy.
            >
            > They produce some excellent inks and will have familiarity with what you will need for letterpress printing. The inks were highly pigmented and produced a very snappy image. I note on their web site they now have an ink line for offset litho which is termed "High Body" inks. The characteristics listed would be great for letterpress it seems to me.
            >
            > John Henry
            > Cedar Creek Press
            >
            >
            > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Incline Press <books.inclinepress@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Fabio,
            > >
            > > Oil based inks from the Dutch Van Son Company are easily available
            > > throughout Europe, and likewise German Hostmann-Steinberg inks.
            > > I can supply addresses if you require them, but you can get them on-line
            > > from the web sites. I use both.
            > >
            > > Regards,
            > >
            > >
            > > Graham Moss
            > > Incline Press
            > > 36 Bow Street
            > > Oldham OL1 1SJ England
            > >
            > > http://www.inclinepress.com
            > >
            >
          • Gerald Lange
            Fabio Probably not a good idea. Best not to screw around with the ink. Just test out the recommendations you have been given by various folks and find one that
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 17 11:49 PM
              Fabio

              Probably not a good idea. Best not to screw around with the ink. Just
              test out the recommendations you have been given by various folks and
              find one that works well for you.

              Gerald
              http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


              On 6/17/10 11:41 PM, i_goonies wrote:
              > Hello!
              > thank you all for the replies.
              >
              > Like Matt Kelsey said, I meant "letterpress inks", because in Italy the word "tipografia" means "letterpress".
              >
              > I was asking for letterpress inks, and exactly if there are industries that still produces original letterpress inks.
              >
              > In Italy I can readily find offset inks, and I've read others printers with a Heidelberg "Windmill" uses offset inks, but I was looking inks similar to the old letterpress inks.
              >
              > I was wondering whether I can use relief inks used in "calcografia" (relief printing) for letterpress. I've read these inks has a pigment rate of 80%, the rest is oil, indee the letterpress inks have got a pigment rate of 20%. This means I must add 4 parts of oil to achieve the 20% pigment's rate.
              >
              > In this way I'll use original relief inks of the past, but converted to letterpress printing.
              >
              > What do you think?
              >
              > Thanks you all!
              > Fabio
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "author50401"<JohnH@...> wrote:
              >
              >> Along with VanSon (whose oil-based inks I currently use), I would recommend finding an Italian distributor for Jänecke+Schneemann Printing Inks of Hanover, Germany. I used their inks for many years as recommended by one of my college instructors, but my source dried up and I wasn't able to locate a distributor who could order in small quantities for me. Perhaps there are more distributors in Italy.
              >>
              >> They produce some excellent inks and will have familiarity with what you will need for letterpress printing. The inks were highly pigmented and produced a very snappy image. I note on their web site they now have an ink line for offset litho which is termed "High Body" inks. The characteristics listed would be great for letterpress it seems to me.
              >>
              >> John Henry
              >> Cedar Creek Press
              >>
              >>
              >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Incline Press<books.inclinepress@> wrote:
              >>
              >>> Fabio,
              >>>
              >>> Oil based inks from the Dutch Van Son Company are easily available
              >>> throughout Europe, and likewise German Hostmann-Steinberg inks.
              >>> I can supply addresses if you require them, but you can get them on-line
              >>> from the web sites. I use both.
              >>>
              >>> Regards,
              >>>
              >>>
              >>> Graham Moss
              >>> Incline Press
              >>> 36 Bow Street
              >>> Oldham OL1 1SJ England
              >>>
              >>> http://www.inclinepress.com
              >>>
              >>>
              >>
              >
            • Katelynn Corrigan
              Hi Fabio, I work in a commercial letterpress shop, and because we need to do Pantone matches, we use modern lithographic inks. They work just fine, though you
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 18 5:41 AM
                Hi Fabio,

                I work in a commercial letterpress shop, and because we need to do Pantone matches, we use modern lithographic inks. They work just fine, though you should seek out the ones with a lot of 'tack.' (Thick and sticky!) I don't remember the ideal 'tack' rating for letterpress inks, but perhaps someone here who is more of a numbers person than me could tell you. I prefer rubber based inks because they are thicker, and when ordering a PMS mix of a color with lots of transparent white in it, I usually order a darker shade and mix it down myself with opaque white to ensure it will be thick enough.

                The ink company I use is local to me- Mixmasters in Lynn Mass, but I also use Spinks (Acrylic) and Van Son (Rubber) inks to do my own mixes.

                Black is, of course, a unique challenge, especially when people spec chintzy paper like Lettra. Its worth seeking out a special black, but for other colors, you will probably get fine results from litho inks. I use a basic "Dense Black" from Mixmasters, which isn't quite as dense as I would like, but because I very rarely print commercial jobs in black, its ok for in-house use.

                Good luck!

                -Katey
                 www.bdesignsinc.com


                Hotmail is redefining busy with tools for the New Busy. Get more from your inbox. See how.
              • Julie Larson
                A sideways question: anyone using acrylic ink for letterhead or anything run through a laser printer by customer? I finally got some acrylic ink to play with
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 18 6:06 AM
                  A sideways question: anyone using acrylic ink for letterhead or anything run through a laser printer by customer? I finally got some acrylic ink to play with and like how it printed and cleaned up off the press, but I note that the can doesn't indicate laser safe, so I was wondering. I would guess that Spinks would have listed it as such if it were laser safe, but thought I would ask the collective wisdom of the list. Thanks.


                  From: Katelynn Corrigan <crazyprettybird@...>
                  To: ppletterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Fri, June 18, 2010 8:41:56 AM
                  Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Industries still producing typographic inks?

                   

                  Hi Fabio,

                  I work in a commercial letterpress shop, and because we need to do Pantone matches, we use modern lithographic inks. They work just fine, though you should seek out the ones with a lot of 'tack.' (Thick and sticky!) I don't remember the ideal 'tack' rating for letterpress inks, but perhaps someone here who is more of a numbers person than me could tell you. I prefer rubber based inks because they are thicker, and when ordering a PMS mix of a color with lots of transparent white in it, I usually order a darker shade and mix it down myself with opaque white to ensure it will be thick enough.

                  The ink company I use is local to me- Mixmasters in Lynn Mass, but I also use Spinks (Acrylic) and Van Son (Rubber) inks to do my own mixes.

                  Black is, of course, a unique challenge, especially when people spec chintzy paper like Lettra. Its worth seeking out a special black, but for other colors, you will probably get fine results from litho inks. I use a basic "Dense Black" from Mixmasters, which isn't quite as dense as I would like, but because I very rarely print commercial jobs in black, its ok for in-house use.

                  Good luck!

                  -Katey
                   www.bdesignsinc. com


                  Hotmail is redefining busy with tools for the New Busy. Get more from your inbox. See how.

                • i_goonies
                  Hello Kate, thanks for the reply. I ll stick with off-set inks like you and the others guys suggested. The PMS thing is a very important thing! Now I ve simply
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 18 12:56 PM
                    Hello Kate,
                    thanks for the reply.

                    I'll stick with off-set inks like you and the others guys suggested.

                    The PMS thing is a very important thing!

                    Now I've simply to find distributors of these inks!

                    Thanks,
                    Fabio


                    --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Katelynn Corrigan <crazyprettybird@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Hi Fabio,
                    >
                    > I work in a commercial letterpress shop, and because we need to do Pantone matches, we use modern lithographic inks. They work just fine, though you should seek out the ones with a lot of 'tack.' (Thick and sticky!) I don't remember the ideal 'tack' rating for letterpress inks, but perhaps someone here who is more of a numbers person than me could tell you. I prefer rubber based inks because they are thicker, and when ordering a PMS mix of a color with lots of transparent white in it, I usually order a darker shade and mix it down myself with opaque white to ensure it will be thick enough.
                    >
                    > The ink company I use is local to me- Mixmasters in Lynn Mass, but I
                    > also use Spinks (Acrylic) and Van Son (Rubber) inks to do my own mixes.
                    >
                    > Black is, of course, a unique challenge, especially when people spec chintzy paper like Lettra. Its worth seeking out a special black, but for other colors, you will probably get fine results from litho inks. I use a basic "Dense Black" from Mixmasters, which isn't quite as dense as I would like, but because I very rarely print commercial jobs in black, its ok for in-house use.
                    >
                    > Good luck!
                    >
                    > -Katey
                    > www.bdesignsinc.com
                    >
                    > _________________________________________________________________
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