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  • Gerald Lange <bieler@worldnet.att.net>
    For those of you who have expressed interest in this: A discussion re the New Series interview has developed over at Speak Up
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 22, 2003
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      For those of you who have expressed interest in this:

      A discussion re the New Series interview has developed over at Speak Up

      http://www.underconsideration.com/speakup_v2/

      Gerald
    • Katie Harper
      Hello all I m giving a short workshop this afternoon on the principles of using photopolymer plates. Normally, when I do these demos, we do a quick n dirty
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 25, 2003
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        Hello all

        I'm giving a short workshop this afternoon on the principles of using
        photopolymer plates. Normally, when I do these demos, we do a quick 'n'
        dirty exposure outside in the sun, just to demonstrate the theories, etc.
        However, I'm guessing that even photopolymer might not work in less than 10
        degrees, and I don't think I want to be doing that outside today.

        Since I usually order plates made professionally, I have not read with a
        close eye all the various methods for home exposure units that have appeared
        from time to time on this list. And I don't have time to build something
        today, even though I now see that I probably should have paid better
        attention and built myself a home unit for emergencies... Anyway, I'm
        thinking that there must be ways of exposing a plate using a Photoflood over
        glass, and am wondering if anyone out there has done this and has some
        advice on it?

        Thanks.


        Katie Harper
        Ars Brevis Press
        Cincinnati, OH
        513-233-9588
        http://www.arsbrevispress.com
      • Rodney Grantham <granthams@wiktel.com>
        ... using ... quick n ... theories, etc. ... than 10 ... with a ... appeared ... something ... I m ... Photoflood over ... some ... Katie For small plates
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 26, 2003
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          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Katie Harper <knharper@f...>
          wrote:
          > Hello all
          >
          > I'm giving a short workshop this afternoon on the principles of
          using
          > photopolymer plates. Normally, when I do these demos, we do a
          quick 'n'
          > dirty exposure outside in the sun, just to demonstrate the
          theories, etc.
          > However, I'm guessing that even photopolymer might not work in less
          than 10
          > degrees, and I don't think I want to be doing that outside today.
          >
          > Since I usually order plates made professionally, I have not read
          with a
          > close eye all the various methods for home exposure units that have
          appeared
          > from time to time on this list. And I don't have time to build
          something
          > today, even though I now see that I probably should have paid better
          > attention and built myself a home unit for emergencies... Anyway,
          I'm
          > thinking that there must be ways of exposing a plate using a
          Photoflood over
          > glass, and am wondering if anyone out there has done this and has
          some
          > advice on it?
          >
          > Thanks.
          >
          >
          > Katie Harper
          > Ars Brevis Press
          > Cincinnati, OH
          > 513-233-9588
          > http://www.arsbrevispress.com

          Katie

          For small plates with line art and type
          the weight of 1/4" plate glass will work
          so you don't have to use a vacuum frame.
          Ordinary blacklight fluorescent bulbs held
          in a striplight works fine. WalMart even
          sells them. Look for F20T12BLB which is
          a 24" 20 watt bulb. With the bulb about 3
          inches above the glass an exposure of 40
          to 60 seconds should be a good starting
          point. Each bulb will expose about 2" of
          plate width. So a 2 bulb fixtures will
          expose a 4" wide plate. Shouldn't cost
          more than $50.

          We prefer liquid photopolymer in our
          print shop since it washes out in less
          than a minute, whereas sheet photopolymers
          take at least 5 minutes, which gets old
          pretty fast for hand processing. Another
          advantage for liquid photopolymers is
          the plate thickness can be changed by the
          thickness of the bearers between the glass.
          We make dies from 1/16" to 3/16" thick.

          Our main use for these dies is for
          imprinting wooden tokens and have found
          that the 40 durometer dies make a better
          impression and conform to the texture of
          the wood.

          Hope this helps.

          Rod Grantham
          www.granthams.com
        • Kent Manske
          Rod, your info to Katie was informative. I have not had the short exposure times that you have with the F20T12BLB, 24 , 20 watt bulb. I just build a box with 6
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 27, 2003
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            Rod, your info to Katie was informative.

            I have not had the short exposure times that you have with the
            F20T12BLB, 24", 20 watt bulb. I just build a box with 6 tubes. Using
            both A&V and Boxcar plates, my exposure was more like 10 minutes (to
            hold 6 pt Bodoni serifs with hand wash) and 25 minutes to get step 16
            on a Stofer (?) scale.

            A phone call to Phillips informed me that the BLB (purple blacklite)
            has a uv filter on it. Their BL (white tube blacklite) does not. I've
            just ordered the BL bulbs and will run more exposure tests next
            weekend with hopes to reduce the required exposure time.

            Recap:
            Phillips F20T12BLB, 24", 20 watt bulb (purple blacklite), available
            at Home Depot and Wallmart.
            Phillips F20T12BL, 24", 20 watt bulb (white tube blacklite),
            available at Bulbs.com

            Rod, let me know if you think I've errored somewhere in my process.

            Thanks, Kent


            Katie

            For small plates with line art and type
            the weight of 1/4" plate glass will work
            so you don't have to use a vacuum frame.
            Ordinary blacklight fluorescent bulbs held
            in a striplight works fine. WalMart even
            sells them. Look for F20T12BLB which is
            a 24" 20 watt bulb. With the bulb about 3
            inches above the glass an exposure of 40
            to 60 seconds should be a good starting
            point. Each bulb will expose about 2" of
            plate width. So a 2 bulb fixtures will
            expose a 4" wide plate. Shouldn't cost
            more than $50.

            We prefer liquid photopolymer in our
            print shop since it washes out in less
            than a minute, whereas sheet photopolymers
            take at least 5 minutes, which gets old
            pretty fast for hand processing. Another
            advantage for liquid photopolymers is
            the plate thickness can be changed by the
            thickness of the bearers between the glass.
            We make dies from 1/16" to 3/16" thick.

            Our main use for these dies is for
            imprinting wooden tokens and have found
            that the 40 durometer dies make a better
            impression and conform to the texture of
            the wood.

            Hope this helps.

            Rod Grantham
            www.granthams.com



            --
            ______________________________
            Kent Manske
            PreNeo Press
            www.preneo.com
          • Rodney Grantham <granthams@wiktel.com>
            ... Using ... (to ... 16 ... blacklite) ... I ve ... Hi Kent The difference in exposure times could be due to several variables. The distance from the bulbs to
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 27, 2003
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              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Kent Manske <kent@p...> wrote:
              > Rod, your info to Katie was informative.
              >
              > I have not had the short exposure times that you have with the
              > F20T12BLB, 24", 20 watt bulb. I just build a box with 6 tubes.
              Using
              > both A&V and Boxcar plates, my exposure was more like 10 minutes
              (to
              > hold 6 pt Bodoni serifs with hand wash) and 25 minutes to get step
              16
              > on a Stofer (?) scale.
              >
              > A phone call to Phillips informed me that the BLB (purple
              blacklite)
              > has a uv filter on it. Their BL (white tube blacklite) does not.
              I've
              > just ordered the BL bulbs and will run more exposure tests next
              > weekend with hopes to reduce the required exposure time.
              >
              > Recap:
              > Phillips F20T12BLB, 24", 20 watt bulb (purple blacklite), available
              > at Home Depot and Wallmart.
              > Phillips F20T12BL, 24", 20 watt bulb (white tube blacklite),
              > available at Bulbs.com
              >
              > Rod, let me know if you think I've errored somewhere in my process.
              >
              > Thanks, Kent

              Hi Kent

              The difference in exposure times could be due to several
              variables. The distance from the bulbs to the plate, the
              voltage supplied to your bulbs and the type of plate
              material. We have our bulbs about 3" from the plate. Line
              voltage effects exposure times. On a dedicated circuit,
              so there is no voltage variation, our line voltage is 119.
              We are using a metal backed sheet polymer from the Louis
              Melind Company.

              If the specifications supplied with your plate material
              recommend a step 16 on a 21 step Stouffer platemakers
              guide, your setup may need a longer exposure. Sounds like
              you're on the right track.

              From our experience with photopolymer there is no difference
              in exposure times between the BL or BLB bulbs, in fact
              there is also a 350BL bulb. The numbers are the same
              on Phillips, Sylvania and GE bulbs.

              On another note, we also have a NuArc fliptop with carbon
              arcs and have found the exposure times need to be about
              4 minutes with this material.

              Regards,

              Rod Grantham
            • Katie Harper
              Thanks to everyone who wrote about home units for exposing polymer plates. The workshop was on Saturday, so I didn t have time to build a home exposure unit. I
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 27, 2003
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                Thanks to everyone who wrote about home units for exposing polymer plates.
                The workshop was on Saturday, so I didn't have time to build a home exposure
                unit. I had bought a 250w photoflood bulb just in case the weather forced
                us indoors. I had no idea of the exposure time, but it probably would have
                been quite lengthy. Anyway, the weather cooperated nicely for us to make our
                exposure outdoors in bright sunlight for two minutes (I think it actually
                got up to 30 that day, a veritable heat wave around here...) I could not
                have asked for a more successful trial, and this was using a very quick 'n'
                dirty "negative" made by running transparency film through my laser printer.
                The workshop participants were suitably impressed as we proofed the plate
                and found it identical to the original (small squiggly lines). It worked so
                well it was a little hard for me to make the usual case about how one can
                do home processing for experimental stuff, but one really needs to have
                plates made professionally for consistently fine detail...

                Now that the workshop is over, I'm going to build my own home unit. I have a
                vacuum frame that was given to me ages ago, but it no longer has the vacuum
                motor. Any idea where I can get hold of that?




                Katie Harper
                Ars Brevis Press
                Cincinnati, OH
                513-233-9588
                http://www.arsbrevispress.com





                > From: "Rodney Grantham <granthams@...>" <granthams@...>
                > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 17:12:42 -0000
                > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Polymer Home Exposure
                >
                > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Kent Manske <kent@p...> wrote:
                >> Rod, your info to Katie was informative.
                >>
                >> I have not had the short exposure times that you have with the
                >> F20T12BLB, 24", 20 watt bulb. I just build a box with 6 tubes.
                > Using
                >> both A&V and Boxcar plates, my exposure was more like 10 minutes
                > (to
                >> hold 6 pt Bodoni serifs with hand wash) and 25 minutes to get step
                > 16
                >> on a Stofer (?) scale.
                >>
                >> A phone call to Phillips informed me that the BLB (purple
                > blacklite)
                >> has a uv filter on it. Their BL (white tube blacklite) does not.
                > I've
                >> just ordered the BL bulbs and will run more exposure tests next
                >> weekend with hopes to reduce the required exposure time.
                >>
                >> Recap:
                >> Phillips F20T12BLB, 24", 20 watt bulb (purple blacklite), available
                >> at Home Depot and Wallmart.
                >> Phillips F20T12BL, 24", 20 watt bulb (white tube blacklite),
                >> available at Bulbs.com
                >>
                >> Rod, let me know if you think I've errored somewhere in my process.
                >>
                >> Thanks, Kent
                >
                > Hi Kent
                >
                > The difference in exposure times could be due to several
                > variables. The distance from the bulbs to the plate, the
                > voltage supplied to your bulbs and the type of plate
                > material. We have our bulbs about 3" from the plate. Line
                > voltage effects exposure times. On a dedicated circuit,
                > so there is no voltage variation, our line voltage is 119.
                > We are using a metal backed sheet polymer from the Louis
                > Melind Company.
                >
                > If the specifications supplied with your plate material
                > recommend a step 16 on a 21 step Stouffer platemakers
                > guide, your setup may need a longer exposure. Sounds like
                > you're on the right track.
                >
                > From our experience with photopolymer there is no difference
                > in exposure times between the BL or BLB bulbs, in fact
                > there is also a 350BL bulb. The numbers are the same
                > on Phillips, Sylvania and GE bulbs.
                >
                > On another note, we also have a NuArc fliptop with carbon
                > arcs and have found the exposure times need to be about
                > 4 minutes with this material.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                > Rod Grantham
                >
                >
                >
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