Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Rubber Based Inks on Polymer Plates

Expand Messages
  • Half Press
    Some more,  reducing or shallowing is a new way for me to call it. Thanks. You are right on the nail once more. Anyone should be reluctant on trying this
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 8, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Some more,

      " reducing or shallowing " is a new way for me to call it. Thanks.

      You are right on the nail once more. Anyone should be reluctant on trying this techniques unless they know what they are doing.

      And, to confim, I do belive that you are indeed the right guy to ask questions to.

      If you are new to letterpress printing, please, think twice before attempting so innovative way to get the job done right. It would be easier just re-plate a plate that deosn't want to cooperate.

      --- On Mon, 4/5/10, bielerpr <Bieler@...> wrote:

      From: bielerpr <Bieler@...>
      Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Rubber Based Inks on Polymer Plates
      To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, April 5, 2010, 6:43 AM

       

      Some further thoughts.

      The concept of reducing or shallowing out a plate is not new. A very detailed and industry sanctioned technical manual "Letterpress Platemaking, " (the last of such) by Frederick Gordon Wallis (1969), indicates that this was a common and considered practice by industry engravers of a previous period. The Wallis tome is somewhat the last gasp summary and does close with discussion of the impending photopolymer plate process.

      Photopolymer plates themselves do "shallow out" as a natural consequence of the technology. Proximity of surface area relative to size of surface area can result in this effect, which is beneficial and is most apparent with the dot pattern of halftones.

      But photopolymer is a relatively soft surface compared to metal photomechanical engravings and I would be reluctant to attempt abrading the surface in any manner nor suggest it as a possibility, especially if the cause is poor film or a damaged plate, which are readily replaceable.

      Gerald
      http://BielerPress. blogspot. com


    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.