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Re: Font Size

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  • author50401
    I have used these plates for miniature books and have goine as far as 4pt. type with good results. I do have an powered washout unit, but I would think careful
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 9, 2010
      I have used these plates for miniature books and have goine as far as 4pt. type with good results. I do have an powered washout unit, but I would think careful hand washing would give similar results. Proper exposure is the key to good plates, say I.

      The idea of testing out a variety of faces and sizes is a good one. It may help you hone your techniques as well.

      John Henry
      Cedar Creek Press

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Belle & Whistle Press" <bwletterpress@...> wrote:
      >
      > We haven't made our own plates, but have just started using Elum for plate
      > processing. Their metric is that all lines and spacing between lines should
      > be greater than .2 points for standard thickness and .35 points for deep
      > relief plates. Although I don't know if that is an absolute minimum of
      > their set up or if it is inflated at all to keep them out of trouble with
      > customers who like to walk the line. So it would seem that the issue is not
      > an issue of the "smallest size type", but rather the size of the strokes
      > used to compose your artwork or text alike-- a large but script-y font may
      > give you more problem than something small and thick (which is going to be a
      > pain have to check, but I am sure you'll get the hang of it).
      >
      > What you could do is to create your plate with a system of lines
      > incrementally varying in thickness, from 1 point down to .05 points for
      > example. Take notes of the whole process and *report back*-- was your
      > printer able to even accurately produce the smallest of lines, was there any
      > visual degradation of quality when creating your negative film and again
      > when exposing the plate, and how they appear when actually used on the press
      > with ink. It would be a neat process to understand what your limits are as
      > well as finding out which part of the process causes the greatest loss of
      > quality-- which you can then use to improve your process with more testing
      > (moving the exposure lights closer of further away, applying more pressure,
      > using more lights for less time, etc.).
      >
      > I'd love to read the results from such an endeavor-- perhaps that means I
      > should build one myself and give it a go. Did you use specific plans to
      > build yours?
      >
      > Nathan
      >
      > Belle & Whistle Press
      > Philadelphia, PA
      > bwletterpress@...
      >
      > On Tue, Mar 9, 2010 at 12:56 AM, rwarnoldjr <rwarnoldjr@...> wrote:
      >
      > >
      > >
      > > I am trying to find out peoples experience with printing type on plates
      > > exposed and processed at home. I built an exposure unit and am using the
      > > Printight plates in both metal and plastic backed. What is the smallest size
      > > type anyone has been able to get on a plate and have it print cleanly with
      > > good sharp edges. I am printing on a C&P 10x15 press.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
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