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  • rwarnoldjr
    I am trying to find out peoples experience with printing type on plates exposed and processed at home. I built an exposure unit and am using the Printight
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 8 9:56 PM
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      I am trying to find out peoples experience with printing type on plates exposed and processed at home. I built an exposure unit and am using the Printight plates in both metal and plastic backed. What is the smallest size type anyone has been able to get on a plate and have it print cleanly with good sharp edges. I am printing on a C&P 10x15 press.
    • Belle & Whistle Press
      We haven t made our own plates, but have just started using Elum for plate processing. Their metric is that all lines and spacing between lines should be
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 9 5:56 AM
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        We haven't made our own plates, but have just started using Elum for plate processing.  Their metric is that all lines and spacing between lines should be greater than .2 points for standard thickness and .35 points for deep relief plates.  Although I don't know if that is an absolute minimum of their set up or if it is inflated at all to keep them out of trouble with customers who like to walk the line.  So it would seem that the issue is not an issue of the "smallest size type", but rather the size of the strokes used to compose your artwork or text alike-- a large but script-y font may give you more problem than something small and thick (which is going to be a pain have to check, but I am sure you'll get the hang of it).

        What you could do is to create your plate with a system of lines incrementally varying in thickness, from 1 point down to .05 points for example.  Take notes of the whole process and report back-- was your printer able to even accurately produce the smallest of lines, was there any visual degradation of quality when creating your negative film and again when exposing the plate, and how they appear when actually used on the press with ink.  It would be a neat process to understand what your limits are as well as finding out which part of the process causes the greatest loss of quality-- which you can then use to improve your process with more testing (moving the exposure lights closer of further away, applying more pressure, using more lights for less time, etc.).

        I'd love to read the results from such an endeavor-- perhaps that means I should build one myself and give it a go.  Did you use specific plans to build yours?

        Nathan

        Belle & Whistle Press
        Philadelphia, PA
        bwletterpress@...

        On Tue, Mar 9, 2010 at 12:56 AM, rwarnoldjr <rwarnoldjr@...> wrote:
         

        I am trying to find out peoples experience with printing type on plates exposed and processed at home. I built an exposure unit and am using the Printight plates in both metal and plastic backed. What is the smallest size type anyone has been able to get on a plate and have it print cleanly with good sharp edges. I am printing on a C&P 10x15 press.


      • author50401
        I have used these plates for miniature books and have goine as far as 4pt. type with good results. I do have an powered washout unit, but I would think careful
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 9 6:15 AM
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          I have used these plates for miniature books and have goine as far as 4pt. type with good results. I do have an powered washout unit, but I would think careful hand washing would give similar results. Proper exposure is the key to good plates, say I.

          The idea of testing out a variety of faces and sizes is a good one. It may help you hone your techniques as well.

          John Henry
          Cedar Creek Press

          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Belle & Whistle Press" <bwletterpress@...> wrote:
          >
          > We haven't made our own plates, but have just started using Elum for plate
          > processing. Their metric is that all lines and spacing between lines should
          > be greater than .2 points for standard thickness and .35 points for deep
          > relief plates. Although I don't know if that is an absolute minimum of
          > their set up or if it is inflated at all to keep them out of trouble with
          > customers who like to walk the line. So it would seem that the issue is not
          > an issue of the "smallest size type", but rather the size of the strokes
          > used to compose your artwork or text alike-- a large but script-y font may
          > give you more problem than something small and thick (which is going to be a
          > pain have to check, but I am sure you'll get the hang of it).
          >
          > What you could do is to create your plate with a system of lines
          > incrementally varying in thickness, from 1 point down to .05 points for
          > example. Take notes of the whole process and *report back*-- was your
          > printer able to even accurately produce the smallest of lines, was there any
          > visual degradation of quality when creating your negative film and again
          > when exposing the plate, and how they appear when actually used on the press
          > with ink. It would be a neat process to understand what your limits are as
          > well as finding out which part of the process causes the greatest loss of
          > quality-- which you can then use to improve your process with more testing
          > (moving the exposure lights closer of further away, applying more pressure,
          > using more lights for less time, etc.).
          >
          > I'd love to read the results from such an endeavor-- perhaps that means I
          > should build one myself and give it a go. Did you use specific plans to
          > build yours?
          >
          > Nathan
          >
          > Belle & Whistle Press
          > Philadelphia, PA
          > bwletterpress@...
          >
          > On Tue, Mar 9, 2010 at 12:56 AM, rwarnoldjr <rwarnoldjr@...> wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > I am trying to find out peoples experience with printing type on plates
          > > exposed and processed at home. I built an exposure unit and am using the
          > > Printight plates in both metal and plastic backed. What is the smallest size
          > > type anyone has been able to get on a plate and have it print cleanly with
          > > good sharp edges. I am printing on a C&P 10x15 press.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
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