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Re: [PPLetterpress] Dismantling a Windmill for moving

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  • Peter Fraterdeus
    ... Oh no! One of my favorites! Yeah... but we re thankful for folks willing to put up with our little obsession eh? ... P
    Message 1 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
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      On 4 Nov 2009, at 5:47 PM, Fritz Klinke wrote:
      > ...
      > And as to the quality of hired help--after everything was moved and
      > in place, I parked in a place I didn't usually park at our new
      > building, and when I got out of the car, the glint of type metal
      > caught my eye--there was a nice little pile of 96 pt Huxley Vertical

      Oh no! One of my favorites!
      Yeah... but we're thankful for folks willing to put up with our little
      obsession eh?
      :-)

      P

      > in the road, right where someone dumped it off the top of a case of
      > type. It was ok, but that lead to a closer search of the area and a
      > few more pieces showed up in the gravel, including part of my union
      > bug collection. Well, I could not have done all that work myself and
      > others don't share the same passionate feelings towards this stuff
      > that I do.
      >
      > Fritz
    • speedgray@aol.com
      In my shop at home I have a Miehle Vertical, a Windmill, two C-4 Intertypes, two Ludlow machines, a 10x15 C&P and a 14 x 22 C&P, plus two Challenge 23
      Message 2 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
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        In my shop at home I have a Miehle Vertical, a Windmill, two C-4
        Intertypes, two Ludlow machines, a 10x15 C&P and a 14 x 22 C&P, plus two Challenge
        23" cutters. All accumulated over the past seven years or so. I moved all of
        this equipment myself. All you need is a pallet jack and a heavy duty
        utility trailer. Plus, moving equipment (rigging) is a pleasurable activity if
        done safely.

        Speed Gray
        Grad rapids, MI


        In a message dated 11/4/2009 4:42:01 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
        peterf@... writes:





        On 4 Nov 2009, at 3:37 PM, Harold Kyle wrote:

        > The best you can do is remove the flywheel, which will then allow
        > you to
        > remove the "table" on the front which holds the paper feed and
        > delivery
        > sections. These parts are not exactly easy to remove but they are
        > possible.
        > You're still left with two very heavy castings which are not
        > suitable for
        > carrying. I can describe the process required for this if you'd
        > like, and it
        > should print fine afterwards because everything's pinned in place.
        > Incidentally, I support a constitutional amendment to prohibit
        > presses from
        > basements.

        That would have to be the subterranean rider on the First Amendment, eh?

        Or a prohibition on Underground Lit?

        ;-)

        P

        >
        > Hope this helps,
        > Harold
        >
        > --
        > ---
        > Boxcar Press
        > 501 W. Fayette St. #222
        > Syracuse, NY 13204
        > www.boxcarpress.
        >

        Peter Fraterdeus
        Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
        _http://slowprint.http_ (http://slowprint.com/)







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Arthur
        A pleasurable activity?..............right............... Is your home shop in a basement????????? I highly doubt it. If it was all level ground - then yes no
        Message 3 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
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          A pleasurable activity?..............right...............

          Is your home shop in a basement????????? I highly doubt it.

          If it was all level ground - then yes no problem, it could be sort of pleasurable. I have pallet jacks, hydraulic jacks, a come along and even a pallet lifter - but how do I get it up 7 concrete stairs!!!
          So far the highest quote is $8000.00 !!!
          Even after contacting Heidelberg to dismantle it, I am still not convinced that they are even comfortable with it.
          It's a real shame to be honest...... not sure what to do.





          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, speedgray@... wrote:
          >
          > In my shop at home I have a Miehle Vertical, a Windmill, two C-4
          > Intertypes, two Ludlow machines, a 10x15 C&P and a 14 x 22 C&P, plus two Challenge
          > 23" cutters. All accumulated over the past seven years or so. I moved all of
          > this equipment myself. All you need is a pallet jack and a heavy duty
          > utility trailer. Plus, moving equipment (rigging) is a pleasurable activity if
          > done safely.
          >
          > Speed Gray
          > Grad rapids, MI
          >
          >
          > In a message dated 11/4/2009 4:42:01 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
          > peterf@... writes:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On 4 Nov 2009, at 3:37 PM, Harold Kyle wrote:
          >
          > > The best you can do is remove the flywheel, which will then allow
          > > you to
          > > remove the "table" on the front which holds the paper feed and
          > > delivery
          > > sections. These parts are not exactly easy to remove but they are
          > > possible.
          > > You're still left with two very heavy castings which are not
          > > suitable for
          > > carrying. I can describe the process required for this if you'd
          > > like, and it
          > > should print fine afterwards because everything's pinned in place.
          > > Incidentally, I support a constitutional amendment to prohibit
          > > presses from
          > > basements.
          >
          > That would have to be the subterranean rider on the First Amendment, eh?
          >
          > Or a prohibition on Underground Lit?
          >
          > ;-)
          >
          > P
          >
          > >
          > > Hope this helps,
          > > Harold
          > >
          > > --
          > > ---
          > > Boxcar Press
          > > 501 W. Fayette St. #222
          > > Syracuse, NY 13204
          > > www.boxcarpress.
          > >
          >
          > Peter Fraterdeus
          > Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
          > _http://slowprint.http_ (http://slowprint.com/)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • jason@greenboathouse.com
          I was working on a 14.5x22 beast earlier this summer, and I m currently working on a 10x15 - believe me, the former makes the latter look and feel like a toy.
          Message 4 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
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            I was working on a 14.5x22 beast earlier this summer, and I'm currently working on a 10x15 - believe me, the former makes the latter look and feel like a toy. Seems to me that without too much trouble you can get the ink disk, etc., the platen, the flywheel & shaft, and other smaller bits off, leaving you with the main hulk of the press. At that point it doesn't seem too terrible to line your stairs with some 1" plywood, load and strap the press onto a palet-jack, and hoist it up your stairs. The trick, of course, being that you'll need something like a tank to hook your come-along into.

            While I've heard time and again of the horrors of dismantling C&Ps, and while I certainly wouldn't advise anyone to do so unles they're comfortable with the basic engineering, the re-assembly, in my experience, is just a matter of careful planning, patient and focused work, and a willingness to expect a good challenge or 10 along the way. Nothing's impossible, and a sense of adventure tends to carry the burden half the distance.

            In the past 6 months I've found, partially dismantled, moved, and restored a 14.5x22 C&P Oldstyle, a 10x15 Newstyle, an 8x12 Westman & Baker, a 30" C&P cutter, a Challenge proof press, 3 cabinets of type, and all the bits & pieces. Most of this was heaved into a U-Haul on a palet-jack (up that flimsy loading ramp that comes with the truck). The big C&P went on a tilt-flat-deck with a winch. Most of it had to come across a bumpy and soft yard, and up and over an 8-inch deck. All good fun.

            It really is, I think, the attitude that dictates the difficulty. Like my old man always said, no pain, no gain.

            Jason
            Greenboathouse Press



            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Arthur
            To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 6:29 PM
            Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Dismantling a Windmill for moving



            A pleasurable activity?..............right...............

            Is your home shop in a basement????????? I highly doubt it.

            If it was all level ground - then yes no problem, it could be sort of pleasurable. I have pallet jacks, hydraulic jacks, a come along and even a pallet lifter - but how do I get it up 7 concrete stairs!!!
            So far the highest quote is $8000.00 !!!
            Even after contacting Heidelberg to dismantle it, I am still not convinced that they are even comfortable with it.
            It's a real shame to be honest...... not sure what to do.

            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, speedgray@... wrote:
            >
            > In my shop at home I have a Miehle Vertical, a Windmill, two C-4
            > Intertypes, two Ludlow machines, a 10x15 C&P and a 14 x 22 C&P, plus two Challenge
            > 23" cutters. All accumulated over the past seven years or so. I moved all of
            > this equipment myself. All you need is a pallet jack and a heavy duty
            > utility trailer. Plus, moving equipment (rigging) is a pleasurable activity if
            > done safely.
            >
            > Speed Gray
            > Grad rapids, MI
            >
            >
            > In a message dated 11/4/2009 4:42:01 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
            > peterf@... writes:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > On 4 Nov 2009, at 3:37 PM, Harold Kyle wrote:
            >
            > > The best you can do is remove the flywheel, which will then allow
            > > you to
            > > remove the "table" on the front which holds the paper feed and
            > > delivery
            > > sections. These parts are not exactly easy to remove but they are
            > > possible.
            > > You're still left with two very heavy castings which are not
            > > suitable for
            > > carrying. I can describe the process required for this if you'd
            > > like, and it
            > > should print fine afterwards because everything's pinned in place.
            > > Incidentally, I support a constitutional amendment to prohibit
            > > presses from
            > > basements.
            >
            > That would have to be the subterranean rider on the First Amendment, eh?
            >
            > Or a prohibition on Underground Lit?
            >
            > ;-)
            >
            > P
            >
            > >
            > > Hope this helps,
            > > Harold
            > >
            > > --
            > > ---
            > > Boxcar Press
            > > 501 W. Fayette St. #222
            > > Syracuse, NY 13204
            > > www.boxcarpress.
            > >
            >
            > Peter Fraterdeus
            > Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
            > _http://slowprint.http_ (http://slowprint.com/)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • okintertype
            Moving a press that weighs 2500 lbs. is not something to be taken lightly. I assume you meant seven concrete steps rather than stairs. Every move is at
            Message 5 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
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              Moving a press that weighs 2500 lbs. is not something to be taken lightly. I assume you meant seven concrete "steps" rather than "stairs." Every move is at least somewhat different. I moved mine off a low, flat bed trailer onto a ground level shop floor using homemade lumber ramps, properly blocked up to take the weight, and using pipe rollers and come alongs. This was done after installing 4 x 6 six ft. long lumber skids under the press to stabilize it. It's tedious and somewhat dangerous, but it can be done safely.

              Stan


              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Arthur" <steinsteve@...> wrote:
              >
              > A pleasurable activity?..............right...............
              >
              > Is your home shop in a basement????????? I highly doubt it.
              >
              > If it was all level ground - then yes no problem, it could be sort of pleasurable. I have pallet jacks, hydraulic jacks, a come along and even a pallet lifter - but how do I get it up 7 concrete stairs!!!
              > So far the highest quote is $8000.00 !!!
              > Even after contacting Heidelberg to dismantle it, I am still not convinced that they are even comfortable with it.
              > It's a real shame to be honest...... not sure what to do.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, speedgray@ wrote:
              > >
              > > In my shop at home I have a Miehle Vertical, a Windmill, two C-4
              > > Intertypes, two Ludlow machines, a 10x15 C&P and a 14 x 22 C&P, plus two Challenge
              > > 23" cutters. All accumulated over the past seven years or so. I moved all of
              > > this equipment myself. All you need is a pallet jack and a heavy duty
              > > utility trailer. Plus, moving equipment (rigging) is a pleasurable activity if
              > > done safely.
              > >
              > > Speed Gray
              > > Grad rapids, MI
              > >
              > >
              > > In a message dated 11/4/2009 4:42:01 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
              > > peterf@ writes:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > On 4 Nov 2009, at 3:37 PM, Harold Kyle wrote:
              > >
              > > > The best you can do is remove the flywheel, which will then allow
              > > > you to
              > > > remove the "table" on the front which holds the paper feed and
              > > > delivery
              > > > sections. These parts are not exactly easy to remove but they are
              > > > possible.
              > > > You're still left with two very heavy castings which are not
              > > > suitable for
              > > > carrying. I can describe the process required for this if you'd
              > > > like, and it
              > > > should print fine afterwards because everything's pinned in place.
              > > > Incidentally, I support a constitutional amendment to prohibit
              > > > presses from
              > > > basements.
              > >
              > > That would have to be the subterranean rider on the First Amendment, eh?
              > >
              > > Or a prohibition on Underground Lit?
              > >
              > > ;-)
              > >
              > > P
              > >
              > > >
              > > > Hope this helps,
              > > > Harold
              > > >
              > > > --
              > > > ---
              > > > Boxcar Press
              > > > 501 W. Fayette St. #222
              > > > Syracuse, NY 13204
              > > > www.boxcarpress.
              > > >
              > >
              > > Peter Fraterdeus
              > > Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
              > > _http://slowprint.http_ (http://slowprint.com/)
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
            • Peter Fraterdeus
              Hmmm. OK, got some time to offer my two cents here. ... There s a big difference between a C&P - even 14.5x22 - and a Heidelberg ;-) I d sure hate to go
              Message 6 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
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                Hmmm. OK, got some time to offer my two cents here.

                On 4 Nov 2009, at 8:51 PM, jason@... wrote:

                > I was working on a 14.5x22 beast earlier this summer, and I'm
                > currently working on a 10x15 - believe me, the former makes the
                > latter look and feel like a toy. Seems to me that without too much
                > trouble you can get the ink disk, etc., the platen, the flywheel &
                > shaft, and other smaller bits off, leaving you with the main hulk of
                > the press. At that point it doesn't seem too terrible to line your
                > stairs with some 1" plywood, load and strap the press onto a palet-
                > jack, and hoist it up your stairs. The trick, of course, being that
                > you'll need something like a tank to hook your come-along into.


                There's a big difference between a C&P - even 14.5x22 - and a
                Heidelberg ;-)
                I'd sure hate to go through dismantling a Windmill if I didn't have
                to! And hope I never have to!

                > If it was all level ground - then yes no problem, it could be sort
                > of pleasurable. I have pallet jacks, hydraulic jacks, a come along
                > and even a pallet lifter - but how do I get it up 7 concrete stairs!!!
                > So far the highest quote is $8000.00 !!!
                > Even after contacting Heidelberg to dismantle it, I am still not
                > convinced that they are even comfortable with it.
                > It's a real shame to be honest...... not sure what to do.


                Still, as far as the steps go, a ramp and a skid is the way to go. If
                you can get the press on a skid, two 6x12 timbers, say, bolted down
                with lags, and a couple of cold-steel rods to slip under these.

                You can move anything with 5/8 inch steel rods. Just jimmy up the
                front of your skid and get the roller under it.
                Move tons with your pinky ;-) (once it's moving, anyway...)

                The ramp, of course, will need to be very solid. But wood is very
                strong, if used correctly.

                My friends in Anamosa have been known to hire an auto-tow-truck, and
                use the winch to move/skid a press out of wherever and then pick it up
                (with plenty and multiple and redundant cables and straps) to get it
                on a palette.

                Is the door frame solid?
                My first shop was moved out of a basement (back in 1980) in downtown
                Evanston, IL. The mover put two timbers across the threshold of the
                doorway at the top of the stairs (fortunately a straight shot), and
                mounted his winch behind that. Put the presses on skids (as above),
                hooked a heavy wire cable to the press (around the frame and hooked
                back onto itself) to the press and pulled it right up the stairs. I
                think he only had a ramp up the first few, since once it's on the
                angle, the skids will come right along the stairs (assuming they are
                all at the same grade). Skids are chamfered at the ends to assist with
                this, of course.

                Basic machines are your friend :^) Think of it like moving a huge
                block of granite up the pyramids!

                Inclined plane, rollers, winches, hydraulic jacks, Johnson Bar, or the
                biggest crowbar available.
                Non-stretching rope, heavy mesh straps, etc.

                If you have to slide the skid (as opposed to rolling) get a few yards
                of scrap carpet. Will help slide loads over all kinds of surfaces,
                either carpet side down to protect the floor, or carpet side up to
                provide a smoother ride over ridges, thresholds, and so forth.

                The Windmill has a set of holes in the frame through which you can run
                a 2 inch steel pipe (the heavier the better) (I think it's 2 inch...)
                The ones shown in the photo were a bit thin and bent in the process,
                but no problem holding the weight of the press.

                See photo here:
                http://bit.ly/uqq1Y

                I was fortunate to have this 'little' electric fork to work with,
                although I didn't know there was a longer set of forks available,
                which would have helped a lot...

                But we also used simple jack and wedge to get the other press off its
                palette.

                Or ON the palette/skids if you don't have a way to lift it otherwise.
                Get a pipe in there, build a stack of 2x4s under each end of it, and
                jack up the front of the press until you can slide another 2x4 on the
                pile, then, let the jack down, put a 2x4 under the jack and repeat.
                Then repeat at the other end of the press.

                The pipes need to be long enough and the stacks of wood need to be far
                enough apart to eventually be able to get your skids under the foot of
                the press... Reverse to get it off the skids...
                Also remember to put your drip pan down before putting the press in
                place!

                Anyway, the first rule of moving presses is don't try to save it if it
                starts goin' over ;-)
                Seriously. Really.

                The second rule is think three times before putting any strain on your
                self, or your equipment, and make sure it will NOT go over by lifting
                from above if at all possible.

                I can say rigging's a pleasurable sort of activity for problem solvers
                and back of the envelope engineer types ;-)

                Good luck and be safe!

                P

                PS Feel free to send me half of the eight-grand for the free advice ;-)

                >
                > ...
                > A pleasurable activity?..............right...............
                >
                > Is your home shop in a basement????????? I highly doubt it.

                Peter Fraterdeus
                Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
                http://slowprint.com/
              • bielerpr
                I really didn t want to get into this, having moved lots of presses in my time and with lots of amazing stories, but, quite frankly, who cares? why do guys get
                Message 7 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  I really didn't want to get into this, having moved lots of presses in my time and with lots of amazing stories, but, quite frankly, who cares? why do guys get off on this?

                  A member called me up on the phone tonight and said, "tell them to make a phone call."

                  Really, unless you are young and poor and stupid, make the call. To a reputable press mover. You may live, without physical damage, to tell about it.

                  Gerald
                  PPL

                  --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hmmm. OK, got some time to offer my two cents here.
                  >
                  > On 4 Nov 2009, at 8:51 PM, jason@... wrote:
                  >
                  > > I was working on a 14.5x22 beast earlier this summer, and I'm
                  > > currently working on a 10x15 - believe me, the former makes the
                  > > latter look and feel like a toy. Seems to me that without too much
                  > > trouble you can get the ink disk, etc., the platen, the flywheel &
                  > > shaft, and other smaller bits off, leaving you with the main hulk of
                  > > the press. At that point it doesn't seem too terrible to line your
                  > > stairs with some 1" plywood, load and strap the press onto a palet-
                  > > jack, and hoist it up your stairs. The trick, of course, being that
                  > > you'll need something like a tank to hook your come-along into.
                  >
                  >
                  > There's a big difference between a C&P - even 14.5x22 - and a
                  > Heidelberg ;-)
                  > I'd sure hate to go through dismantling a Windmill if I didn't have
                  > to! And hope I never have to!
                  >
                  > > If it was all level ground - then yes no problem, it could be sort
                  > > of pleasurable. I have pallet jacks, hydraulic jacks, a come along
                  > > and even a pallet lifter - but how do I get it up 7 concrete stairs!!!
                  > > So far the highest quote is $8000.00 !!!
                  > > Even after contacting Heidelberg to dismantle it, I am still not
                  > > convinced that they are even comfortable with it.
                  > > It's a real shame to be honest...... not sure what to do.
                  >
                  >
                  > Still, as far as the steps go, a ramp and a skid is the way to go. If
                  > you can get the press on a skid, two 6x12 timbers, say, bolted down
                  > with lags, and a couple of cold-steel rods to slip under these.
                  >
                  > You can move anything with 5/8 inch steel rods. Just jimmy up the
                  > front of your skid and get the roller under it.
                  > Move tons with your pinky ;-) (once it's moving, anyway...)
                  >
                  > The ramp, of course, will need to be very solid. But wood is very
                  > strong, if used correctly.
                  >
                  > My friends in Anamosa have been known to hire an auto-tow-truck, and
                  > use the winch to move/skid a press out of wherever and then pick it up
                  > (with plenty and multiple and redundant cables and straps) to get it
                  > on a palette.
                  >
                  > Is the door frame solid?
                  > My first shop was moved out of a basement (back in 1980) in downtown
                  > Evanston, IL. The mover put two timbers across the threshold of the
                  > doorway at the top of the stairs (fortunately a straight shot), and
                  > mounted his winch behind that. Put the presses on skids (as above),
                  > hooked a heavy wire cable to the press (around the frame and hooked
                  > back onto itself) to the press and pulled it right up the stairs. I
                  > think he only had a ramp up the first few, since once it's on the
                  > angle, the skids will come right along the stairs (assuming they are
                  > all at the same grade). Skids are chamfered at the ends to assist with
                  > this, of course.
                  >
                  > Basic machines are your friend :^) Think of it like moving a huge
                  > block of granite up the pyramids!
                  >
                  > Inclined plane, rollers, winches, hydraulic jacks, Johnson Bar, or the
                  > biggest crowbar available.
                  > Non-stretching rope, heavy mesh straps, etc.
                  >
                  > If you have to slide the skid (as opposed to rolling) get a few yards
                  > of scrap carpet. Will help slide loads over all kinds of surfaces,
                  > either carpet side down to protect the floor, or carpet side up to
                  > provide a smoother ride over ridges, thresholds, and so forth.
                  >
                  > The Windmill has a set of holes in the frame through which you can run
                  > a 2 inch steel pipe (the heavier the better) (I think it's 2 inch...)
                  > The ones shown in the photo were a bit thin and bent in the process,
                  > but no problem holding the weight of the press.
                  >
                  > See photo here:
                  > http://bit.ly/uqq1Y
                  >
                  > I was fortunate to have this 'little' electric fork to work with,
                  > although I didn't know there was a longer set of forks available,
                  > which would have helped a lot...
                  >
                  > But we also used simple jack and wedge to get the other press off its
                  > palette.
                  >
                  > Or ON the palette/skids if you don't have a way to lift it otherwise.
                  > Get a pipe in there, build a stack of 2x4s under each end of it, and
                  > jack up the front of the press until you can slide another 2x4 on the
                  > pile, then, let the jack down, put a 2x4 under the jack and repeat.
                  > Then repeat at the other end of the press.
                  >
                  > The pipes need to be long enough and the stacks of wood need to be far
                  > enough apart to eventually be able to get your skids under the foot of
                  > the press... Reverse to get it off the skids...
                  > Also remember to put your drip pan down before putting the press in
                  > place!
                  >
                  > Anyway, the first rule of moving presses is don't try to save it if it
                  > starts goin' over ;-)
                  > Seriously. Really.
                  >
                  > The second rule is think three times before putting any strain on your
                  > self, or your equipment, and make sure it will NOT go over by lifting
                  > from above if at all possible.
                  >
                  > I can say rigging's a pleasurable sort of activity for problem solvers
                  > and back of the envelope engineer types ;-)
                  >
                  > Good luck and be safe!
                  >
                  > P
                  >
                  > PS Feel free to send me half of the eight-grand for the free advice ;-)
                  >
                  > >
                  > > ...
                  > > A pleasurable activity?..............right...............
                  > >
                  > > Is your home shop in a basement????????? I highly doubt it.
                  >
                  > Peter Fraterdeus
                  > Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
                  > http://slowprint.com/
                  >
                • Peter Fraterdeus
                  ... Honestly, I hope I never have to move another press in my life, but the press gods may have other plans, who knows. However, I m happy to be able to
                  Message 8 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On 4 Nov 2009, at 11:18 PM, bielerpr wrote:

                    > I really didn't want to get into this, having moved lots of presses
                    > in my time and with lots of amazing stories, but, quite frankly, who
                    > cares? why do guys get off on this?
                    >
                    > A member called me up on the phone tonight and said, "tell them to
                    > make a phone call."
                    >
                    > Really, unless you are young and poor and stupid, make the call. To
                    > a reputable press mover. You may live, without physical damage, to
                    > tell about it.
                    >
                    > Gerald
                    > PPL


                    Honestly, I hope I never have to move another press in my life, but
                    the press gods may have other plans, who knows.

                    However, I'm happy to be able to contribute a useful synopsis.
                    And I don't care to try to understand why someone would begrudge that,
                    why do guys get off on that?

                    Easy to say "make a phone call" - perhaps some of us are not so well
                    endowed as to just snap our fingers and 'make it so'
                    Maybe some of us like to get dirty and greasy and figure out a tough
                    problem now and then.

                    Fer cryin' out loud. If I wasn't an optimist, I'd have just let you
                    ruin a perfectly good mood.

                    Cheers :-)

                    P

                    Peter Fraterdeus
                    http://slowprint.com/
                  • bielerpr
                    Whatever. G
                    Message 9 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Whatever.

                      G

                      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > On 4 Nov 2009, at 11:18 PM, bielerpr wrote:
                      >
                      > > I really didn't want to get into this, having moved lots of presses
                      > > in my time and with lots of amazing stories, but, quite frankly, who
                      > > cares? why do guys get off on this?
                      > >
                      > > A member called me up on the phone tonight and said, "tell them to
                      > > make a phone call."
                      > >
                      > > Really, unless you are young and poor and stupid, make the call. To
                      > > a reputable press mover. You may live, without physical damage, to
                      > > tell about it.
                      > >
                      > > Gerald
                      > > PPL
                      >
                      >
                      > Honestly, I hope I never have to move another press in my life, but
                      > the press gods may have other plans, who knows.
                      >
                      > However, I'm happy to be able to contribute a useful synopsis.
                      > And I don't care to try to understand why someone would begrudge that,
                      > why do guys get off on that?
                      >
                      > Easy to say "make a phone call" - perhaps some of us are not so well
                      > endowed as to just snap our fingers and 'make it so'
                      > Maybe some of us like to get dirty and greasy and figure out a tough
                      > problem now and then.
                      >
                      > Fer cryin' out loud. If I wasn't an optimist, I'd have just let you
                      > ruin a perfectly good mood.
                      >
                      > Cheers :-)
                      >
                      > P
                      >
                      > Peter Fraterdeus
                      > http://slowprint.com/
                      >
                    • one@onefootinfront.com
                      Gerald is right, coming from the experience of being young, broke and stupid I now use movers for more anything over 1500#...so worth it plus you must be a
                      Message 10 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Gerald is right, coming from the experience of being young, broke and stupid
                        I now use movers for more anything over 1500#...so worth it

                        plus you must be a superior mechanic to piece out a Heidelberg and than
                        get it to work again. kudos if you have that skill

                        > Whatever.
                        >
                        > G
                        >
                        > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
                        >>
                        >>
                        >> On 4 Nov 2009, at 11:18 PM, bielerpr wrote:
                        >>
                        >> > I really didn't want to get into this, having moved lots of presses
                        >> > in my time and with lots of amazing stories, but, quite frankly, who
                        >> > cares? why do guys get off on this?
                        >> >
                        >> > A member called me up on the phone tonight and said, "tell them to
                        >> > make a phone call."
                        >> >
                        >> > Really, unless you are young and poor and stupid, make the call. To
                        >> > a reputable press mover. You may live, without physical damage, to
                        >> > tell about it.
                        >> >
                        >> > Gerald
                        >> > PPL
                        >>
                        >>
                        >> Honestly, I hope I never have to move another press in my life, but
                        >> the press gods may have other plans, who knows.
                        >>
                        >> However, I'm happy to be able to contribute a useful synopsis.
                        >> And I don't care to try to understand why someone would begrudge that,
                        >> why do guys get off on that?
                        >>
                        >> Easy to say "make a phone call" - perhaps some of us are not so well
                        >> endowed as to just snap our fingers and 'make it so'
                        >> Maybe some of us like to get dirty and greasy and figure out a tough
                        >> problem now and then.
                        >>
                        >> Fer cryin' out loud. If I wasn't an optimist, I'd have just let you
                        >> ruin a perfectly good mood.
                        >>
                        >> Cheers :-)
                        >>
                        >> P
                        >>
                        >> Peter Fraterdeus
                        >> http://slowprint.com/
                        >>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • jason@greenboathouse.com
                        I should mention that I mistakenly thought we were talking about C&Ps, not Heidelbergs. I have no experience whatsoever with the latter... Jason ... From:
                        Message 11 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I should mention that I mistakenly thought we were talking about C&Ps, not Heidelbergs.
                          I have no experience whatsoever with the latter...

                          Jason



                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: one@...
                          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 9:48 PM
                          Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Dismantling a Windmill for moving



                          Gerald is right, coming from the experience of being young, broke and stupid
                          I now use movers for more anything over 1500#...so worth it

                          plus you must be a superior mechanic to piece out a Heidelberg and than
                          get it to work again. kudos if you have that skill

                          > Whatever.
                          >
                          > G
                          >
                          > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> On 4 Nov 2009, at 11:18 PM, bielerpr wrote:
                          >>
                          >> > I really didn't want to get into this, having moved lots of presses
                          >> > in my time and with lots of amazing stories, but, quite frankly, who
                          >> > cares? why do guys get off on this?
                          >> >
                          >> > A member called me up on the phone tonight and said, "tell them to
                          >> > make a phone call."
                          >> >
                          >> > Really, unless you are young and poor and stupid, make the call. To
                          >> > a reputable press mover. You may live, without physical damage, to
                          >> > tell about it.
                          >> >
                          >> > Gerald
                          >> > PPL
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> Honestly, I hope I never have to move another press in my life, but
                          >> the press gods may have other plans, who knows.
                          >>
                          >> However, I'm happy to be able to contribute a useful synopsis.
                          >> And I don't care to try to understand why someone would begrudge that,
                          >> why do guys get off on that?
                          >>
                          >> Easy to say "make a phone call" - perhaps some of us are not so well
                          >> endowed as to just snap our fingers and 'make it so'
                          >> Maybe some of us like to get dirty and greasy and figure out a tough
                          >> problem now and then.
                          >>
                          >> Fer cryin' out loud. If I wasn't an optimist, I'd have just let you
                          >> ruin a perfectly good mood.
                          >>
                          >> Cheers :-)
                          >>
                          >> P
                          >>
                          >> Peter Fraterdeus
                          >> http://slowprint.com/
                          >>
                          >
                          >
                          >





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Steve Robison
                          To would be press movers... I can t resist jumping in here with yet another absurd mover s thought... Some years back, we were on vacation and it rained
                          Message 12 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            To would be press movers...

                            I can't resist jumping in here with yet another absurd mover's thought...

                            Some years back, we were on vacation and it rained buckets while we were gone. Our basement flooded because the sump pump we had down there decided to quit. Murphy's law always works overtime when you're gone on vacation. Anyway, when we got back home we had a fairly good sized swimming pool under the house and stuff floating around everywhere down there.

                            So my thought is this:

                            As opposed to spending $8,000 to move the windmill, just hire some folks to move everything but the Heidi out of the basement. Then attach flotation devices to the windmill and fill the basement with water until you can float the press out!

                            Let's see....

                            $250 for labor to move everything out of the basement
                            $450 for some really effective flotation tanks to attach to the press
                            $500 water bill to fill up the basement
                            $150 for a pump to pump out all the water after you get the press out
                            $150 fan rental to air out the basement afterward
                            $250 for labor to move everything else back in to the basement
                            $250 for all the misc. stuff I forgot you'll need
                            = $2,000 TOTAL

                            See, with a little ingenuity you could save $6000 on the move, and if you invite the local TV news crews over, you could even see yourself on the 6 o'clock news that night, not to mention a YouTube video or two on the web, and maybe ask for donations to offset the costs sent to your offshore account.

                            It's kind of like a story my Dad used to tell about a farmer who was having a problem getting his truck full of chicken's up a steep grade. So the farmer stopped the truck and sent his son to the back of the truck with a stick, instructing his son to wave the stick around wildly. The farmer then gunned the engine, and while his son waved the stick, half of the chickens were kept flying around, and the truck made it up and over the grade without a problem.

                            Sometimes thinking out of the box (or in this case, "out of the basement") might make the impossible possible!

                            By the way, I too have moved my share of heavy printing equipment over the years, both for myself and many others. I tend to shy away from moving anything larger than a 10x15 C&P, and have been quite comfortable watching (and sometimes advising) professional movers move the rest.

                            Best wishes,

                            --Steve

                            Steve Robison
                            The Robison Press
                            Belmont, CA - about 25 miles south of San Francisco
                            robisonsteve@...



                            __________________________________________________
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                            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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                          • Steve Robison
                            By the way, when it s larger than a 10 x 15, I call the Hicks Brothers! --Steve Steve Robison robisonsteve@yahoo.com
                            Message 13 of 23 , Nov 4, 2009
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                              By the way, when it's larger than a 10 x 15, I call the Hicks Brothers!

                              --Steve

                              Steve Robison
                              robisonsteve@...


                              --- On Wed, 11/4/09, Steve Robison <robisonsteve@...> wrote:

                              > From: Steve Robison <robisonsteve@...>
                              > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Dismantling a Windmill for moving
                              > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                              > Date: Wednesday, November 4, 2009, 11:03 PM
                              > To would be press movers...
                              >
                              > I can't resist jumping in here with yet another absurd
                              > mover's thought...
                              >
                              > Some years back, we were on vacation and it rained buckets
                              > while we were gone. Our basement flooded because the sump
                              > pump we had down there decided to quit. Murphy's law always
                              > works overtime when you're gone on vacation. Anyway, when we
                              > got back home we had a fairly good sized swimming pool under
                              > the house and stuff floating around everywhere down there.
                              >
                              > So my thought is this:
                              >
                              > As opposed to spending $8,000 to move the windmill, just
                              > hire some folks to move everything but the Heidi out of the
                              > basement. Then attach flotation devices to the windmill and
                              > fill the basement with water until you can float the press
                              > out!
                              >
                              > Let's see....
                              >
                              >     $250 for labor to move everything out of the
                              > basement
                              >     $450 for some really effective flotation
                              > tanks to attach to the press
                              >     $500 water bill to fill up the basement
                              >     $150 for a pump to pump out all the water
                              > after you get the press out
                              >     $150 fan rental to air out the basement
                              > afterward
                              >     $250 for labor to move everything else back
                              > in to the basement
                              >     $250 for all the misc. stuff I forgot you'll
                              > need
                              > = $2,000 TOTAL
                              >
                              > See, with a little ingenuity you could save $6000 on the
                              > move, and if you invite the local TV news crews over, you
                              > could even see yourself on the 6 o'clock news that night,
                              > not to mention a YouTube video or two on the web, and maybe
                              > ask for donations to offset the costs sent to your offshore
                              > account.
                              >
                              > It's kind of like a story my Dad used to tell about a
                              > farmer who was having a problem getting his truck full of
                              > chicken's up a steep grade. So the farmer stopped the truck
                              > and sent his son to the back of the truck with a stick,
                              > instructing his son to wave the stick around wildly. The
                              > farmer then gunned the engine, and while his son waved the
                              > stick, half of the chickens were kept flying around, and the
                              > truck made it up and over the grade without a problem.
                              >
                              > Sometimes thinking out of the box (or in this case, "out of
                              > the basement") might make the impossible possible!
                              >
                              > By the way, I too have moved my share of heavy printing
                              > equipment over the years, both for myself and many others. I
                              > tend to shy away from moving anything larger than a 10x15
                              > C&P, and have been quite comfortable watching (and
                              > sometimes advising) professional movers move the rest.
                              >
                              > Best wishes,
                              >
                              > --Steve
                              >
                              > Steve Robison
                              > The Robison Press
                              > Belmont, CA - about 25 miles south of San Francisco
                              > robisonsteve@...
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > __________________________________________________
                              > Do You Yahoo!?
                              > Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                              > protection around
                              > http://mail.yahoo.com
                              >
                            • Visualpropaganda
                              Hello all, I just moved a windmill about two months ago. It was already dismantled. The table (with paper feed etc.) was on a different pallet than the base. I
                              Message 14 of 23 , Nov 5, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hello all,

                                I just moved a windmill about two months ago. It was already
                                dismantled. The table (with paper feed etc.) was on a different pallet
                                than the base. I just hired a truck and was able to put it on the
                                truck with help from the people from whom I bought it. I tried
                                unloading it with the help of my father and nearly killed myself. No
                                kidding! It's not fun when 1 ton of heavy german steal on a pallet-
                                jack is pushing you from the truck ramp. I was lucky enough that one
                                of the pallet-jack wheels got caught somewhere on the ramp and stopped
                                the whole pallet-jack + windmill base to go further. If this didn't
                                happen, I definitely couldn't write you these few lines.
                                I managed to get the base from the truck anyway, but soon after it
                                fell over onto the street. Unfortunately onto the impression throw-
                                off lever, which got bend below the weight of the base. I couldn't get
                                the base up again and from the street. So I had to call a heavy
                                machinery moving company who picked it up with a forklift and put it
                                in my garage. So I head to pay someone anyway. If I had hired them
                                from the start to unload the windmill, it probably wouldn't be damaged
                                (which I was able to fix by now) and I wouldn't have risked my life.
                                I know letterpress is a passion, but one to die for or even worse get
                                crippled for? I've learned from that, that I will never move the
                                windmill or a windmill on my own again.

                                Just another note about dismantling the windmill. I've found a retired
                                german heidelberg service technician, who helped me repair my windmill
                                and will help me to restore it. He said dismantling the table and
                                other pieces like the engine and the air pump doesn't really hurt the
                                windmill. It will all fit together again nicely. The advantage is,
                                that you will have the chance to give the windmill a good clean up
                                while dismantled.

                                Hope this helps
                                Mirko





                                Am 05.11.2009 um 06:18 schrieb bielerpr:

                                > I really didn't want to get into this, having moved lots of presses
                                > in my time and with lots of amazing stories, but, quite frankly, who
                                > cares? why do guys get off on this?
                                >
                                > A member called me up on the phone tonight and said, "tell them to
                                > make a phone call."
                                >
                                > Really, unless you are young and poor and stupid, make the call. To
                                > a reputable press mover. You may live, without physical damage, to
                                > tell about it.
                                >
                                > Gerald
                                > PPL
                                >
                                > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
                                > wrote:
                                >>
                                >> Hmmm. OK, got some time to offer my two cents here.
                                >>
                                >> On 4 Nov 2009, at 8:51 PM, jason@... wrote:
                                >>
                                >>> I was working on a 14.5x22 beast earlier this summer, and I'm
                                >>> currently working on a 10x15 - believe me, the former makes the
                                >>> latter look and feel like a toy. Seems to me that without too much
                                >>> trouble you can get the ink disk, etc., the platen, the flywheel &
                                >>> shaft, and other smaller bits off, leaving you with the main hulk of
                                >>> the press. At that point it doesn't seem too terrible to line your
                                >>> stairs with some 1" plywood, load and strap the press onto a palet-
                                >>> jack, and hoist it up your stairs. The trick, of course, being that
                                >>> you'll need something like a tank to hook your come-along into.
                                >>
                                >>
                                >> There's a big difference between a C&P - even 14.5x22 - and a
                                >> Heidelberg ;-)
                                >> I'd sure hate to go through dismantling a Windmill if I didn't have
                                >> to! And hope I never have to!
                                >>
                                >>> If it was all level ground - then yes no problem, it could be sort
                                >>> of pleasurable. I have pallet jacks, hydraulic jacks, a come along
                                >>> and even a pallet lifter - but how do I get it up 7 concrete
                                >>> stairs!!!
                                >>> So far the highest quote is $8000.00 !!!
                                >>> Even after contacting Heidelberg to dismantle it, I am still not
                                >>> convinced that they are even comfortable with it.
                                >>> It's a real shame to be honest...... not sure what to do.
                                >>
                                >>
                                >> Still, as far as the steps go, a ramp and a skid is the way to go. If
                                >> you can get the press on a skid, two 6x12 timbers, say, bolted down
                                >> with lags, and a couple of cold-steel rods to slip under these.
                                >>
                                >> You can move anything with 5/8 inch steel rods. Just jimmy up the
                                >> front of your skid and get the roller under it.
                                >> Move tons with your pinky ;-) (once it's moving, anyway...)
                                >>
                                >> The ramp, of course, will need to be very solid. But wood is very
                                >> strong, if used correctly.
                                >>
                                >> My friends in Anamosa have been known to hire an auto-tow-truck, and
                                >> use the winch to move/skid a press out of wherever and then pick it
                                >> up
                                >> (with plenty and multiple and redundant cables and straps) to get it
                                >> on a palette.
                                >>
                                >> Is the door frame solid?
                                >> My first shop was moved out of a basement (back in 1980) in downtown
                                >> Evanston, IL. The mover put two timbers across the threshold of the
                                >> doorway at the top of the stairs (fortunately a straight shot), and
                                >> mounted his winch behind that. Put the presses on skids (as above),
                                >> hooked a heavy wire cable to the press (around the frame and hooked
                                >> back onto itself) to the press and pulled it right up the stairs. I
                                >> think he only had a ramp up the first few, since once it's on the
                                >> angle, the skids will come right along the stairs (assuming they are
                                >> all at the same grade). Skids are chamfered at the ends to assist
                                >> with
                                >> this, of course.
                                >>
                                >> Basic machines are your friend :^) Think of it like moving a huge
                                >> block of granite up the pyramids!
                                >>
                                >> Inclined plane, rollers, winches, hydraulic jacks, Johnson Bar, or
                                >> the
                                >> biggest crowbar available.
                                >> Non-stretching rope, heavy mesh straps, etc.
                                >>
                                >> If you have to slide the skid (as opposed to rolling) get a few yards
                                >> of scrap carpet. Will help slide loads over all kinds of surfaces,
                                >> either carpet side down to protect the floor, or carpet side up to
                                >> provide a smoother ride over ridges, thresholds, and so forth.
                                >>
                                >> The Windmill has a set of holes in the frame through which you can
                                >> run
                                >> a 2 inch steel pipe (the heavier the better) (I think it's 2
                                >> inch...)
                                >> The ones shown in the photo were a bit thin and bent in the process,
                                >> but no problem holding the weight of the press.
                                >>
                                >> See photo here:
                                >> http://bit.ly/uqq1Y
                                >>
                                >> I was fortunate to have this 'little' electric fork to work with,
                                >> although I didn't know there was a longer set of forks available,
                                >> which would have helped a lot...
                                >>
                                >> But we also used simple jack and wedge to get the other press off its
                                >> palette.
                                >>
                                >> Or ON the palette/skids if you don't have a way to lift it otherwise.
                                >> Get a pipe in there, build a stack of 2x4s under each end of it, and
                                >> jack up the front of the press until you can slide another 2x4 on the
                                >> pile, then, let the jack down, put a 2x4 under the jack and repeat.
                                >> Then repeat at the other end of the press.
                                >>
                                >> The pipes need to be long enough and the stacks of wood need to be
                                >> far
                                >> enough apart to eventually be able to get your skids under the foot
                                >> of
                                >> the press... Reverse to get it off the skids...
                                >> Also remember to put your drip pan down before putting the press in
                                >> place!
                                >>
                                >> Anyway, the first rule of moving presses is don't try to save it if
                                >> it
                                >> starts goin' over ;-)
                                >> Seriously. Really.
                                >>
                                >> The second rule is think three times before putting any strain on
                                >> your
                                >> self, or your equipment, and make sure it will NOT go over by lifting
                                >> from above if at all possible.
                                >>
                                >> I can say rigging's a pleasurable sort of activity for problem
                                >> solvers
                                >> and back of the envelope engineer types ;-)
                                >>
                                >> Good luck and be safe!
                                >>
                                >> P
                                >>
                                >> PS Feel free to send me half of the eight-grand for the free
                                >> advice ;-)
                                >>
                                >>>
                                >>> ...
                                >>> A pleasurable activity?..............right...............
                                >>>
                                >>> Is your home shop in a basement????????? I highly doubt it.
                                >>
                                >> Peter Fraterdeus
                                >> Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
                                >> http://slowprint.com/
                                >>
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > ------------------------------------
                                >
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              • Peter Fraterdeus
                                A cautionary tale indeed. Don t use a pallet jack on a ramp. Bad idea. Glad to hear you and the press survived. Also glad to hear you ve got a German tech
                                Message 15 of 23 , Nov 5, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  A cautionary tale indeed.

                                  Don't use a pallet jack on a ramp.

                                  Bad idea.

                                  Glad to hear you and the press survived.
                                  Also glad to hear you've got a German tech nearby. Great resource!!

                                  Anybody know of a Windmill service tech in the Upper Midwest?

                                  PF

                                  On 5 Nov 2009, at 4:37 AM, Visualpropaganda wrote:

                                  > Hello all,
                                  >
                                  > I just moved a windmill about two months ago. It was already
                                  > dismantled. The table (with paper feed etc.) was on a different pallet
                                  > than the base. I just hired a truck and was able to put it on the
                                  > truck with help from the people from whom I bought it. I tried
                                  > unloading it with the help of my father and nearly killed myself. No
                                  > ...
                                  > I know letterpress is a passion, but one to die for or even worse get
                                  > crippled for? I've learned from that, that I will never move the
                                  > windmill or a windmill on my own again.
                                  >
                                  > Just another note about dismantling the windmill. I've found a retired
                                  > german heidelberg service technician, who helped me repair my windmill
                                  > and will help me to restore it. He said dismantling the table and
                                  > other pieces like the engine and the air pump doesn't really hurt the
                                  > windmill. It will all fit together again nicely. The advantage is,
                                  > that you will have the chance to give the windmill a good clean up
                                  > while dismantled.
                                  >
                                  > Hope this helps
                                  > Mirko
                                  >
                                  >

                                  Peter Fraterdeus
                                  Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
                                  http://slowprint.com/
                                • Joanna Brinckerhoff
                                  Peter, I don t know if he is still in the business, but I worked with a man named John Guteck who was a Heidelberg technician. He installed the Windmill that
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Nov 5, 2009
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Peter,



                                    I don't know if he is still in the business, but I worked with a man named
                                    John Guteck who was a Heidelberg technician. He installed the Windmill that
                                    you purchased from me, taught me how to use it, and serviced it for me every
                                    year.

                                    He was located outside of Chicago and the contact numbers I have for him are
                                    847-550-1617 (business) and 847-804-1617 (cell). It's been a while since I
                                    last called him, but maybe he is still around.



                                    Hope all is well with you.



                                    Thanks,

                                    Joanna



                                    Joanna Brinckerhoff

                                    Joie Designs, Ltd.

                                    123 West Hickory Street

                                    Hinsdale, Illinois 60521

                                    Tel: 312.543.9582

                                    Fax: 630.920.3102

                                    Email: joanna@...



                                    _____

                                    From: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com]
                                    On Behalf Of Peter Fraterdeus
                                    Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 9:04 AM
                                    To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Dismantling a Windmill for moving





                                    A cautionary tale indeed.

                                    Don't use a pallet jack on a ramp.

                                    Bad idea.

                                    Glad to hear you and the press survived.
                                    Also glad to hear you've got a German tech nearby. Great resource!!

                                    Anybody know of a Windmill service tech in the Upper Midwest?

                                    PF

                                    On 5 Nov 2009, at 4:37 AM, Visualpropaganda wrote:

                                    > Hello all,
                                    >
                                    > I just moved a windmill about two months ago. It was already
                                    > dismantled. The table (with paper feed etc.) was on a different pallet
                                    > than the base. I just hired a truck and was able to put it on the
                                    > truck with help from the people from whom I bought it. I tried
                                    > unloading it with the help of my father and nearly killed myself. No
                                    > ...
                                    > I know letterpress is a passion, but one to die for or even worse get
                                    > crippled for? I've learned from that, that I will never move the
                                    > windmill or a windmill on my own again.
                                    >
                                    > Just another note about dismantling the windmill. I've found a retired
                                    > german heidelberg service technician, who helped me repair my windmill
                                    > and will help me to restore it. He said dismantling the table and
                                    > other pieces like the engine and the air pump doesn't really hurt the
                                    > windmill. It will all fit together again nicely. The advantage is,
                                    > that you will have the chance to give the windmill a good clean up
                                    > while dismantled.
                                    >
                                    > Hope this helps
                                    > Mirko
                                    >
                                    >

                                    Peter Fraterdeus
                                    Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
                                    http://slowprint. <http://slowprint.com/> com/





                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Eric
                                    ... I d say instead, never use a ramp without control of the object (by winch, comealong, ropes, helpers with prybars and/or wedges for brakes; there are many
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Nov 5, 2009
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                                      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Don't use a pallet jack on a ramp.

                                      I'd say instead, never use a ramp without control of the object (by winch, comealong, ropes, helpers with prybars and/or wedges for brakes; there are many possibilites) and never stand downramp of a heavy moveable object. A jack could be used with those conditions.
                                      And yes, I did learn that the hard way.
                                      --Eric Holub, SF
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