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Re: [PPLetterpress] Mixing ink colors

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  • Katie Harper
    Susan: I have found inks colors that have a lot of trans white to be problematic. I have now started custom ordering the ink from a local ink company, instead
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 4, 2002
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      Susan:

      I have found inks colors that have a lot of trans white to be problematic. I
      have now started custom ordering the ink from a local ink company, instead
      of mixing it myself. That has solved a lot of problems.


      Katie Harper
      Ars Brevis Press
      Cincinnati, OH
      513-233-9588
      http://www.arsbrevispress.com





      > From: Susan Angebranndt <susan@...>
      > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2002 16:43:19 -0800
      > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Mixing ink colors
      >
      >
      > Recently I mixed up a PMS color that was mostly transparent white
      > (using Vanson rubber-based ink). The color matched, but when I went
      > to print, the result was as if I had lowered my rollers -- there was
      > splatter all around the type. I had just printed the plate using
      > black ink with good results, and all I did was clean the press and
      > re-ink. Does anyone have any advice for me? (I have a C&P pilot, so
      > changing the roller height isn't really an option; I removed some
      > packing from the platen but that didn't really help the splatter
      > problem much)
      >
      > Thanks
      > Susan Angebranndt
      > susan@...
      >
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    • The Indian Hill Press
      Susan: Sounds like classic overinking. With pale colors, we starve the press as much as the solids will allow. Note that this may necessitate reducing the
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 5, 2002
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        Susan:

        Sounds like classic overinking. With pale colors, we starve the press
        as much as the solids will allow. Note that this may necessitate
        reducing the amount of transparent white in your PMS formula to
        maintain color fidelity. But with letterpress, the recipes are all
        eyeballed anyway.

        Dan Waters
        Indian Hill Press

        >Recently I mixed up a PMS color that was mostly transparent white
        >(using Vanson rubber-based ink). The color matched, but when I went
        >to print, the result was as if I had lowered my rollers -- there was
        >splatter all around the type. I had just printed the plate using
        >black ink with good results, and all I did was clean the press and
        >re-ink. Does anyone have any advice for me? (I have a C&P pilot, so
        >changing the roller height isn't really an option; I removed some
        >packing from the platen but that didn't really help the splatter
        >problem much)
        >
        >Thanks
        >Susan Angebranndt
        >susan@...
      • alncarter2003 <alncarter@hotmail.com>
        Hi, These pastel-toned inks require a finer touch than our more-forgiving black inks. The areas of concern are: roller pressure, amount of ink on roller, the
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 12, 2002
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          Hi,
          These pastel-toned inks require a finer touch than our
          more-forgiving black inks. The areas of concern are: roller pressure,
          amount of ink on roller, the ink mix, and the printing impression.

          Even that Pilot can be finessed and duct tape is the way to do it:
          apply to those rails that the rollers ride on and you'll back off the
          pressure--one of those Vandercook (round thing on a metal stick)
          gauges that NA Graphics sells is perfect for checking the
          roller-to-plate pressure. You can also just wrap the tape around the
          metal collars that go on the ends of the rollers.

          As for ink on the rollers, I usually ink up until the rollers are
          evenly coated and then take off excess ink with paper--this way there
          are no "starved" areas on the rollers which actually take ink off of
          the plate, but you're not over-inked either. If you haven't done it
          lately, before you ink up it wouldn't be a bad idea to test those
          rollers for imperfections by rolling them on a table and looking to
          see if they contact the surface evenly or if you can sometimes see
          light peek through while you move them--if so, new rollers are the
          only cure. We'll just assume that those rollers are clean, unglazed,
          at the proper diameter, and aren't as hard as a rock.

          Mixing ink. Depending on paper and press (and operator), this
          varies, but I usually add 30-50% more white ink than the formula
          says--letterpress lays a thicker layer of ink than offset and that
          extra ink increases the value to the point, with these pastels, that
          you often wind up printing several pms numbers up the scale from the
          color that you are trying to lay down. With more white ink in the mix,
          while you're laying down more ink than our offset brethren (who that
          pms book is calibrated for) you'll be actually putting down the
          correct amount of pigment required to produce that matching color.

          Printing pressure affects these colors' presentation, with heavy
          pressure producing darker tones. As the Pilot tends to print on the
          heavy pressure side, most of your color adjustments will have to be
          made as discussed above. Either that or do 50 pushups before
          printing--then perhaps your arms will be tired enough for a gentler
          impression. Hope this helps. --Hal
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