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RE: [PPLetterpress] Run length of Polymer plates

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  • susanne martin
    What do you do about the sticky stuff that holds it to the base? I have only used my plates a few times for much shorter runs, I am worried about when the
    Message 1 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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      What do you do about the sticky stuff that holds it to the base? I have only used my plates a few times for much shorter runs, I am worried about when the sticky won't stick any more.



      Susanne



      To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      From: scott@...
      Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 20:28:19 -0700
      Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Run length of Polymer plates





      I can't give you a run number, but there's one plate I've used over
      three years at probably 10,000 impressions, more or less.

      I could be off by a couple thousand.

      They should not wear out from age unless you are in high humidity.
      When I first got started with polymers I had a batch that kept
      disintegrating. For one thing, I didn't know back then that they were
      water etched, being accustomed to metal plates. For another thing, I
      didn't notice that they were on a table inches from an old brick wall
      which the rain came down. The plates were getting bombarded with tiny
      splatters at night when I wasn't there.

      --Scott

      On Sep 17, 2009, at 8:15 PM, matthew lamoureux wrote:

      > What's the run length metal backed photo polymer plates are rated for?
      > What's the longest run you've gotten out of a photo polymer plate?
      > With proper storage and care what's the longest anyone has kept and
      > used a plate?
      >
      > These are the question the gentleman I'm working on a project for
      > is asking. He's skeptical about using plastic plates, but
      > understands the cost saving compared to magnesium. I'm also trying
      > to show him he won't need to make an investment in lots of type he
      > he uses plates.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >









      _________________________________________________________________
      Hotmail� has ever-growing storage! Don�t worry about storage limits.
      http://windowslive.com/Tutorial/Hotmail/Storage?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Tutorial_Storage_062009

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Peter Fraterdeus
      ... Welcome Claire! ... Congratulations! Welcome again to the wonderfully fulfilling and regularly frustrating world of letterpress printing (with polymer!)
      Message 2 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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        On 17 Sep 2009, at 8:32 PM, Claire Gendron wrote:

        > This is my first post to this group.

        Welcome Claire!

        > I've used illustrator and photoshop quite a bit and just bought a
        > pilot and
        > am really excited about creating my own designs.

        Congratulations!

        Welcome again to the wonderfully fulfilling and regularly frustrating
        world of letterpress printing (with polymer!)


        > I know how to use the adobe programs but I don't know what resolution
        > settings/types of images are best to use to create plates. Are line
        > images
        > best?

        Unless you are attempting to produce halftone images (ie, like photos
        in a newspaper), which would likely increase your frustration level
        quite a lot as a beginner, stick to line art, 100% solid spot-colors,
        and relatively small solid areas. Small presses are great for type,
        not for solid color across the whole piece.

        > Can varying gray scales be reproduced? Also, would a deep relief base
        > be better than a regular base?

        Only if the extra depth allows you to use gauge pins

        > Why do they recommend a smaller base than
        > the printer's chase size?
        >

        Because on most hand-fed platen presses, you have to put gauge pins in
        the tympan sheet and the base will smash into them.

        > Any information would be appreciated as I don't have any other
        > source of
        > information, have never used a press, and have yet to have
        > successfully
        > goaded my significant other into setting up my pilot : (
        >

        Hmmm. I highly recommend searching out the (inevitable?) other hidden
        letterpress folks in your area.
        While this list is full of helpful people (and an invaluable archive,
        highly recommended) there's nothing like seeing the real thing in
        action!


        Here are my top five points for letterpress printers

        1. Keep your hands out of the press when it's moving
        1a. check three times before turning the press that no collisions
        are imminent - between form and gauge pins, frisket arms and form, etc
        etc. Go slow.

        2. use waaaaay less ink than you think you'll need... a teaspoon of
        ink will print thousands of business cards ;-)
        But if you're mixing a color, mix more than you think you'll need! Mix
        magnesium carbonate (a type of chalk from printmaking suppiers like
        Daniel Smith) into your ink to 'shorten it'. Most commercial printing
        inks are for lithography and are far too viscous to work well for
        relief printing. Use more 'mag' than you think you'll need ;-).... but
        not too much!

        2a. Don't hesitate to dump your ink, wash the press and start over
        if it's not working right.
        2b. use waaay less ink on the press than you think you'll need...
        did I say that already?

        3. raise the rollers, using layers of thin, smooth (Scotch?) tape on
        the roller tracks. If they no longer ink the form, they're too high.
        Otherwise, keep raising them ;-)

        3a. buy new rollers and never let them sit on the form or the ink-
        plate for longer than a few seconds. Flat spots are easily prevented,
        but will ruin any chance of good printing.
        3b. use good steel roller trucks, and keep them as clean as possible

        4. use an appropriate stock, appropriate packing behind the tympan
        sheet and appropriate makeready. In the final days of commercial
        letterpress, printers used as smooth and hard a stock as possible to
        get a very sharp 'kiss' impression, with practically no depth. Today,
        we have the luxury of using fine soft papers, like fine-art etching
        (Rives, Arches, Hahnemuhle) or a few commercial papers such as Crane's
        Lettra, designed to take the depth of impression. However, the back
        side of the sheet should still show very little evidence. Use as
        little makeready as possible (the sheets under the tympan added to the
        packing), but use enough!

        4a. Control the humidity in the press room. Winter dryness will make
        for very hard paper. 50% humidity is excellent, but nearly impossible
        to maintain in heating season (or in the desert, etc). Dampened paper
        is a joy to print, but adds substantially to the time, and is
        impractical for many jobs, and for many papers. Check the archives
        here for more on that.

        5. Demand perfection from your press. But be happy with progress ;-)

        Good luck, and keep us up to date!

        Peter

        Peter Fraterdeus
        Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
        http://slowprint.com/
      • Amanda Dimitrov
        I second that!! Thanks very much for your time and help! I am brand new to this forum but love it already! thank you again!! ________________________________
        Message 3 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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          I second that!! Thanks very much for your time and help! I am brand new to this forum but love it already!
          thank you again!!




          ________________________________
          From: "engrossersscript@..." <engrossersscript@...>
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, September 17, 2009 9:04:33 PM
          Subject: Re: & CALLIGRAPHY Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: photopolymer plate newbie

           
          Thank you all soooooooooooo very much for taking the time to answer my question! I really really appreciate it. I can not wait to show you guys how it comes out when I do it.

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Scott Rubel <scott@invitesite. com>
          To: PPLetterpress@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Thu, Sep 17, 2009 7:01 pm
          Subject: Re: & CALLIGRAPHY Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: photopolymer plate newbie

          1200 dpi if the lines are thin. Then you may have to play with
          contrast and then turn into a bitmap to be sure the black is really
          black. It may look black on your monitor, but the negative will
          develop as a screen if it's not 100%.

          --Scott

          On Sep 17, 2009, at 4:31 PM, foofnik79 wrote:

          > i scan my calligraphy in at 600 dpi. make sure the dots on all of
          > the i's, j's, etc. are large enough that they don't get lost. make
          > sure the artwork is 100% black and change it to a bitmap for
          > ordering. check your hairlines and dots again in bitmap format.
          > that's it!
          >
          > --- In PPLetterpress@ yahoogroups. com, engrossersscript@ ... wrote:
          >>
          >>
          >> I am?a calligrapher - so what if I want to write my own script and
          >> scan it... can anyone give me some advise as to what resolution to
          >> scan it or if its even possible! =( I dnt have a machine YET but I
          >> am getting ready!
          >>
          >> Leenah
          >>
          >> Houston, Tx

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Amanda Dimitrov
          Hi! I cannot tell you how helpful your post was! I am saving this one! Thanks again for this great advice and links!! ________________________________ From:
          Message 4 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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            Hi!
            I cannot tell you how helpful your post was! I am saving this one!
            Thanks again for this great advice and links!!




            ________________________________
            From: Visualpropaganda <visualpropaganda.01@...>
            To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, September 17, 2009 5:30:40 PM
            Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] photopolymer plate newbie

             
            Hello Amanda,

            Illustrator, InDesign and Photoshop are the big names in the Graphic
            Design Market. They have a lot of features. And they are quite
            expensive.
            But they are by no means necessary to make your design. You can do it
            in Word if you have to (I wouldn't), you could even draw your designs
            and have them scanned. But as Scott mentioned there are also a few
            free vector and bitmap editing apps, that can give you most of the
            main-features of Illustrator or InDesign:

            The Gimp (Bitmap/Picture- Editing): http://www.gimp. org/

            Inkscape (Vector): http://www.inkscape.org/

            If you need fonts for your designs, there are a lot of free fonts that
            are really high quality and beautyfull. A good start to look for fonts
            is:
            http://www.dafont. com/

            If you want script fonts, check:
            http://www.dafont. com/theme. php?cat=601

            Also a lot of font-designer give away some of their fonts for free.
            For example
            Jos Buivenga (exljibris): http://www.josbuive nga.demon. nl/index. html

            I used Calluna regular, which he gives away for free for a card design
            for my sister.

            Hope that get's you started. All the best
            Mirko

            Am 17.09.2009 um 22:50 schrieb Scott Rubel:

            > I create almost everything with InDesign and sometimes Illustrator,
            > when
            > making plates. These programs allow me to manipulate type and render
            > it
            > about as close to the way it should be as you can get. You need at
            > least
            > Illustrator and a decent collection of fonts.
            >
            > Adobe's current licensing restrictions are pretty harsh, though. They
            > won't both you if you only use one or two computers, but these
            > programs
            > are still expensive if you are just starting out and didn't plan on
            > acquiring them. Even though I own all this stuff, I haven't been
            > upgrading for the last couple of years, and if I had to start over I
            > would consider some alternatives.
            >
            > For instance, I am pretty certain that Adobe Elements or Photoshop
            > Lite
            > may let me do all the tricks I currently do with Photoshop, and I
            > would
            > not miss whatever it is that is missing in the lite version.
            >
            > Also, I have been told about a shareware photo manipulator called The
            > Gimp. Once again, I am passing along news I have not first hand
            > knowledge of, but if I were starting out today, I'd play around with
            > that before laying out the dough for Photoshop. <http://gimp. org>
            >
            > Similarly, I would try a shareware alternative to Illustrator, like
            > Lineform or Inkscape.
            > http://applezoom. com/2007/ 07/12/cheap- alternative- to-adobe- illustrator- for-mac-os- x
            > I do not know how they handle type, though, so I look forward to
            > hearing
            > about all these from personal experience.
            >
            > --Scott
            >
            > amanda.dimitrov wrote:
            >> Hi all,
            >> I am new to the photopolymer plate making technology. I just
            >> purchased a new base from Boxcar Press for my Kelsey 5x8 press. My
            >> experience with letterpress thus far has strictly been in hand set
            >> type and printing blocks that I have found on Ebay. I am so
            >> excited to be able to create my own designs; however, I am having
            >> trouble understanding which program(s) to use to make my designs
            >> and how to get my designs to the platemakers. Do most of you create
            >> designs using Illustrator or Photoshop? Then after the design is
            >> created, do you PDF the document (I read on Boxcar Press that they
            >> prefer PDF docs)? What if I wanted to create a simple design using
            >> Word and then PDF that doc? Would that work as well?
            >>
            >> Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I have read many of these
            >> posts, in addition to researching on Boxcar Press.
            >>
            >> Thanks so much in advance!!
            >> ~A
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> ------------ --------- --------- ------
            >>
            >> Yahoo! Groups Links
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            > ------------ --------- --------- ------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Eric
            ... I have gotten 25,000 impressions off MS plates with no wear, on a cylinder press. Still have the plates, 21 years old now, sitting on a galley; they look
            Message 5 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, matthew lamoureux <lamsland@...> wrote:
              >
              > What's the run length metal backed photo polymer plates are rated for?
              > What's the longest run you've gotten out of a photo polymer plate?
              > With proper storage and care what's the longest anyone has kept and used a plate?
              >
              I have gotten 25,000 impressions off MS plates with no wear, on a cylinder press. Still have the plates, 21 years old now, sitting on a galley; they look printable, but are line art with little detail.
              On the other hand, the HX plates I use now are sometimes unfit for re-use after a couple years, wrapped for storage, if they are typographically detailed. Sometimes re-drying helps, sometimes not.
              The most common practice is to store in a plastic bag to protect from moisture, and away from light. I tend to wrap in used tympan paper (an imperfect barrier), but I also have lead-mounted plates just sitting on galleys, most of which are fine. Go figure.
              Lots of variables, not just light and moisture but also the kind (and batch) of plate material itself are at work here. With photopolymer, I'd say the most important thing to save for re-use is the negative.
              --Eric Holub, SF
            • Visualpropaganda
              Amanda, you are most welcome. If you need more help, just post it here. I ve started doing letterpress a few weeks ago myself. I bought a heidelberg windmill
              Message 6 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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                Amanda, you are most welcome.

                If you need more help, just post it here. I've started doing
                letterpress a few weeks ago myself. I bought a heidelberg windmill on
                ebay. But I'm a designer for a long time and have done prepress for
                offset for some years now. The prepress process for offset printing
                and for preparing photopolymer plates is not very different.

                Have a nice weekend
                Mirko

                Am 18.09.2009 um 15:24 schrieb Amanda Dimitrov:

                > Hi!
                > I cannot tell you how helpful your post was! I am saving this one!
                > Thanks again for this great advice and links!!
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: Visualpropaganda <visualpropaganda.01@...>
                > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Thursday, September 17, 2009 5:30:40 PM
                > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] photopolymer plate newbie
                >
                >
                > Hello Amanda,
                >
                > Illustrator, InDesign and Photoshop are the big names in the Graphic
                > Design Market. They have a lot of features. And they are quite
                > expensive.
                > But they are by no means necessary to make your design. You can do it
                > in Word if you have to (I wouldn't), you could even draw your designs
                > and have them scanned. But as Scott mentioned there are also a few
                > free vector and bitmap editing apps, that can give you most of the
                > main-features of Illustrator or InDesign:
                >
                > The Gimp (Bitmap/Picture- Editing): http://www.gimp. org/
                >
                > Inkscape (Vector): http://www.inkscape.org/
                >
                > If you need fonts for your designs, there are a lot of free fonts that
                > are really high quality and beautyfull. A good start to look for fonts
                > is:
                > http://www.dafont. com/
                >
                > If you want script fonts, check:
                > http://www.dafont. com/theme. php?cat=601
                >
                > Also a lot of font-designer give away some of their fonts for free.
                > For example
                > Jos Buivenga (exljibris): http://www.josbuive nga.demon. nl/index.
                > html
                >
                > I used Calluna regular, which he gives away for free for a card design
                > for my sister.
                >
                > Hope that get's you started. All the best
                > Mirko
                >
                > Am 17.09.2009 um 22:50 schrieb Scott Rubel:
                >
                >> I create almost everything with InDesign and sometimes Illustrator,
                >> when
                >> making plates. These programs allow me to manipulate type and render
                >> it
                >> about as close to the way it should be as you can get. You need at
                >> least
                >> Illustrator and a decent collection of fonts.
                >>
                >> Adobe's current licensing restrictions are pretty harsh, though. They
                >> won't both you if you only use one or two computers, but these
                >> programs
                >> are still expensive if you are just starting out and didn't plan on
                >> acquiring them. Even though I own all this stuff, I haven't been
                >> upgrading for the last couple of years, and if I had to start over I
                >> would consider some alternatives.
                >>
                >> For instance, I am pretty certain that Adobe Elements or Photoshop
                >> Lite
                >> may let me do all the tricks I currently do with Photoshop, and I
                >> would
                >> not miss whatever it is that is missing in the lite version.
                >>
                >> Also, I have been told about a shareware photo manipulator called The
                >> Gimp. Once again, I am passing along news I have not first hand
                >> knowledge of, but if I were starting out today, I'd play around with
                >> that before laying out the dough for Photoshop. <http://gimp. org>
                >>
                >> Similarly, I would try a shareware alternative to Illustrator, like
                >> Lineform or Inkscape.
                >> http://applezoom. com/2007/ 07/12/cheap- alternative- to-adobe-
                >> illustrator- for-mac-os- x
                >> I do not know how they handle type, though, so I look forward to
                >> hearing
                >> about all these from personal experience.
                >>
                >> --Scott
                >>
                >> amanda.dimitrov wrote:
                >>> Hi all,
                >>> I am new to the photopolymer plate making technology. I just
                >>> purchased a new base from Boxcar Press for my Kelsey 5x8 press. My
                >>> experience with letterpress thus far has strictly been in hand set
                >>> type and printing blocks that I have found on Ebay. I am so
                >>> excited to be able to create my own designs; however, I am having
                >>> trouble understanding which program(s) to use to make my designs
                >>> and how to get my designs to the platemakers. Do most of you create
                >>> designs using Illustrator or Photoshop? Then after the design is
                >>> created, do you PDF the document (I read on Boxcar Press that they
                >>> prefer PDF docs)? What if I wanted to create a simple design using
                >>> Word and then PDF that doc? Would that work as well?
                >>>
                >>> Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I have read many of these
                >>> posts, in addition to researching on Boxcar Press.
                >>>
                >>> Thanks so much in advance!!
                >>> ~A
                >>>
                >>>
                >>>
                >>> ------------ --------- --------- ------
                >>>
                >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                >>>
                >>>
                >>>
                >>>
                >>
                >>
                >> ------------ --------- --------- ------
                >>
                >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • Scott Rubel
                Oh, sorry, I only use the steel backed plates, so the sticky answer is for someone else to do. --Scott ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
                Message 7 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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                  Oh, sorry, I only use the steel backed plates, so the sticky answer is
                  for someone else to do. --Scott

                  susanne martin wrote:
                  > What do you do about the sticky stuff that holds it to the base? I have only used my plates a few times for much shorter runs, I am worried about when the sticky won't stick any more.
                  >
                  > Susanne
                  >
                  >
                  > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  > From: scott@...
                  >
                  >
                  > I can't give you a run number, but there's one plate I've used over
                  > three years at probably 10,000 impressions, more or less.
                  >
                  > I could be off by a couple thousand.
                  >
                  > They should not wear out from age unless you are in high humidity.
                  > When I first got started with polymers I had a batch that kept
                  > disintegrating. For one thing, I didn't know back then that they were
                  > water etched, being accustomed to metal plates. For another thing, I
                  > didn't notice that they were on a table inches from an old brick wall
                  > which the rain came down. The plates were getting bombarded with tiny
                  > splatters at night when I wasn't there.
                  >
                  > --Scott
                  >
                  > On Sep 17, 2009, at 8:15 PM, matthew lamoureux wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >> What's the run length metal backed photo polymer plates are rated for?
                  >> What's the longest run you've gotten out of a photo polymer plate?
                  >> With proper storage and care what's the longest anyone has kept and
                  >> used a plate?
                  >>
                  >> These are the question the gentleman I'm working on a project for
                  >> is asking. He's skeptical about using plastic plates, but
                  >> understands the cost saving compared to magnesium. I'm also trying
                  >> to show him he won't need to make an investment in lots of type he
                  >> he uses plates.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> ------------------------------------
                  >>
                  >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > _________________________________________________________________
                  > Hotmail® has ever-growing storage! Don't worry about storage limits.
                  > http://windowslive.com/Tutorial/Hotmail/Storage?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Tutorial_Storage_062009
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Peter Fraterdeus
                  Sticky stuff comes off clean, the sooner the better. If you re going to store plates, get the sticky off the plate. Then use some fresh the next time ;-)
                  Message 8 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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                    Sticky stuff comes off clean, the sooner the better.
                    If you're going to store plates, get the sticky off the plate.
                    Then use some fresh the next time ;-)

                    (Boxcar sells rolls of it)

                    P

                    On 18 Sep 2009, at 12:16 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:

                    > Oh, sorry, I only use the steel backed plates, so the sticky answer is
                    > for someone else to do. --Scott
                    >
                    > susanne martin wrote:
                    >> What do you do about the sticky stuff that holds it to the base? I
                    >> have only used my plates a few times for much shorter runs, I am
                    >> worried about when the sticky won't stick any more.
                    >>
                    >> Susanne
                    >>

                    Peter Fraterdeus
                    Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
                    http://slowprint.com/
                  • matthew lamoureux
                    There s a double sided tape I think you use for adhesive mounted plates. We re planing on using metal backed plates on a bunting base so that won t be an
                    Message 9 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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                      There's a double sided tape I think you use for adhesive mounted plates. We're planing on using metal backed plates on a bunting base so that won't be an issue. This is on a cylinder press and the guy was very happy to hear we could get upwards of 10,000 impressions per plate. We have some old X-ray storage cabinets to store them in and plan to wrap them in saran wrap. I guess we'll put them in some kraft paper too to be sure they're out of the light.

                      If metal backed plates are stored vertically for a long time will they warp?

                      Matthew "LAMMY" Lamoureux
                      Full Metal Press - Operis servo a specialis nundinae


                      Where the press is free and every man able to read, all is safe.
                      Thomas Jefferson


                      When Benjamin Franklin exited the Constitutional Convention, he was asked by a woman, "Sir, what have you given us?" He replied, "A Republic, Ma'am, if you can keep it".




                      ________________________________
                      From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
                      To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Friday, September 18, 2009 1:22:55 PM
                      Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Run length of Polymer plates



                      Sticky stuff comes off clean, the sooner the better.
                      If you're going to store plates, get the sticky off the plate.
                      Then use some fresh the next time ;-)

                      (Boxcar sells rolls of it)

                      P

                      On 18 Sep 2009, at 12:16 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:

                      > Oh, sorry, I only use the steel backed plates, so the sticky answer is
                      > for someone else to do. --Scott
                      >
                      > susanne martin wrote:
                      >> What do you do about the sticky stuff that holds it to the base? I
                      >> have only used my plates a few times for much shorter runs, I am
                      >> worried about when the sticky won't stick any more.
                      >>
                      >> Susanne
                      >>

                      Peter Fraterdeus
                      Exquisite Letterpress from Slow Print Studios
                      http://slowprint. com/







                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Gerald Lange
                      Matthew The claim for photopolymer under ideal conditions is something like 1,000,000. The only time I ve detected wear is when I printed a couple of thousand
                      Message 10 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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                        Matthew

                        The claim for photopolymer under ideal conditions is something like
                        1,000,000. The only time I've detected wear is when I printed a couple
                        of thousand sheets on a paper impregnated with tiny bits of bamboo.

                        I remember Pat Reagh telling me of a job he did on 10,000 sheets of
                        Mexican bark paper that went through three sets of the plates.

                        Normally, though, the stuff is quite resistant to wear.

                        Best way to store them is in zip lock bags. A trick is to breathe into
                        the bag before closing. That provides moisture and carbon dioxide (which
                        revitalizes photopolymer).

                        Store in a cool dark area away from electric devices, lights, motors,
                        etc. Ozone, combined with high temperture, is their enemy.

                        I've been printing with steel-backed plates for about two decades now
                        and they do not curl in my experience. You can store them vertically
                        without concern.

                        Gerald
                        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

                        matthew lamoureux wrote:
                        > There's a double sided tape I think you use for adhesive mounted plates. We're planing on using metal backed plates on a bunting base so that won't be an issue. This is on a cylinder press and the guy was very happy to hear we could get upwards of 10,000 impressions per plate. We have some old X-ray storage cabinets to store them in and plan to wrap them in saran wrap. I guess we'll put them in some kraft paper too to be sure they're out of the light.
                        >
                        > If metal backed plates are stored vertically for a long time will they warp?
                        >
                        > Matthew "LAMMY" Lamoureux
                        > Full Metal Press - Operis servo a specialis nundinae
                        >
                      • bielerpr
                        Something further on this, as it was addressed earlier. In terms of longevity, photopolymer does not last long, though proper care during printing and storage
                        Message 11 of 23 , Sep 18, 2009
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                          Something further on this, as it was addressed earlier. In terms of longevity, photopolymer does not last long, though proper care during printing and storage can extend the life. Essentially, if you touch the photopolymer surface and it does not respond with tackiness, the printing advantage is gone. You might as well be printing on acetate.

                          As Peter suggested, hang on to your film negs if you have any intention of regenerating. With proper storage, film negs tend to last for years. I have some that are at least a decade old and still retain their color and emulsion tack.

                          Gerald
                          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

                          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Lange <Bieler@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Matthew
                          >
                          > The claim for photopolymer under ideal conditions is something like
                          > 1,000,000. The only time I've detected wear is when I printed a couple
                          > of thousand sheets on a paper impregnated with tiny bits of bamboo.
                          >
                          > I remember Pat Reagh telling me of a job he did on 10,000 sheets of
                          > Mexican bark paper that went through three sets of the plates.
                          >
                          > Normally, though, the stuff is quite resistant to wear.
                          >
                          > Best way to store them is in zip lock bags. A trick is to breathe into
                          > the bag before closing. That provides moisture and carbon dioxide (which
                          > revitalizes photopolymer).
                          >
                          > Store in a cool dark area away from electric devices, lights, motors,
                          > etc. Ozone, combined with high temperture, is their enemy.
                          >
                          > I've been printing with steel-backed plates for about two decades now
                          > and they do not curl in my experience. You can store them vertically
                          > without concern.
                          >
                          > Gerald
                          > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
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