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Re: [PPLetterpress] Metal type updated

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  • Graham and Kathy
    Well, suck it and see. Thanks Gerald; we ll be getting some. Looks like they only ship within Europe. Graham Moss Incline Press 36 Bow Street Oldham OL1 1SJ
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 7, 2009
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      Well, suck it and see.

      Thanks Gerald; we'll be getting some. Looks like they only ship within
      Europe.


      Graham Moss

      Incline Press
      36 Bow Street
      Oldham OL1 1SJ England

      http://www.inclinepress.com




      On 5/8/09 19:31, "Peter Fraterdeus" <peterf@...> wrote:

      > I assume it's European height, not .918 inches ;-)
      >
      > P
      >
      > On 5 Aug 2009, at 12:11 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
      >
      >> http://typolade.de/index.html
      >>
      >> Gerald
      >>
      >>
      >
      > Peter Fraterdeus
      > Exquisite Letterpress
      > http://slowprint.com/
      >
      >
    • Gerald Lange
      Graham Just heard that from my TA. The class was going to buy me this a year ago but found as well it couldn t be shipped (got a nice type related sweatshirt
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 8, 2009
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        Graham

        Just heard that from my TA. The class was going to buy me this a year ago but found as well it couldn't be shipped (got a nice type related sweatshirt instead—but my wife confiscated it—she looks much better in it anyway).

        Certainly can understand the rationale for that, customs clearance and all, though my understanding is that metal type specifically cannot be taxed as import in the USA, constitutional freedom of speech and all, whatever that actually means. Sort of like what exactly does the right to bear arms against an unpopular government mean? Historically; not at all, under any circumstance.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


        > Thanks Gerald; we'll be getting some. Looks like they only ship within
        > Europe.
        >
        >
        > Graham Moss
        >
        > Incline Press
        > 36 Bow Street
        > Oldham OL1 1SJ England
        >
        > http://www.inclinepress.com
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > On 5/8/09 19:31, "Peter Fraterdeus" <peterf@...> wrote:
        >
        > > I assume it's European height, not .918 inches ;-)
        > >
        > > P
        > >
        > > On 5 Aug 2009, at 12:11 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
        > >
        > >> http://typolade.de/index.html
        > >>
        > >> Gerald
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > > Peter Fraterdeus
        > > Exquisite Letterpress
        > > http://slowprint.com/
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Ph.D.
        In the very early days of the United States republic, Congress enacted a 25% duty on imports of metal type, but no duty at all on matrices. This was to
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 9, 2009
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          In the very early days of the United States republic,
          Congress enacted a 25% duty on imports of metal
          type, but no duty at all on matrices. This was to
          encourage a domestic type founding industry. (See
          "Irregularities in the Customs Shed" by Paul Duensing,
          1984, on Miller & Richard of Scotland's complaints
          in 1876 that they were being overcharged on the
          25% duty.)

          As far as I know this law still stands. My personal
          experience has been that if the type comes in a
          heavy enough box that it must be delivered by common
          carrier, you will have to go through a customs broker
          and pay the duty. If it's small enough to come via the
          post office or UPS, then it just shows up at your
          shop with no furthur ado. I don't know why the difference.

          --Ph. D.


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Gerald Lange
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2009 3:32 AM
          Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Metal type updated
          Certainly can understand the rationale for that, customs clearance and all, though my understanding is that metal type specifically cannot be taxed as import in the USA, constitutional freedom of speech and all, whatever that actually means. Sort of like what exactly does the right to bear arms against an unpopular government mean? Historically; not at all, under any circumstance.



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        • Gerald Lange
          Makes sense. I recall one of the early, significant American type foundries did make an official complaint to the government about a duty on bismuth (I have a
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 9, 2009
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            Makes sense. I recall one of the early, significant American type foundries did make an official complaint to the government about a duty on bismuth (I have a copy somewhere), wherein they cited restrictions as detrimental to purpose and commerce. Somewhat interesting to me as I assumed that antimony had replaced bismuth as an essential in type casting by the early 16th century.

            Gerald
            http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Ph.D." <phil@...> wrote:
            >
            > In the very early days of the United States republic,
            > Congress enacted a 25% duty on imports of metal
            > type, but no duty at all on matrices. This was to
            > encourage a domestic type founding industry. (See
            > "Irregularities in the Customs Shed" by Paul Duensing,
            > 1984, on Miller & Richard of Scotland's complaints
            > in 1876 that they were being overcharged on the
            > 25% duty.)
            >
            > As far as I know this law still stands. My personal
            > experience has been that if the type comes in a
            > heavy enough box that it must be delivered by common
            > carrier, you will have to go through a customs broker
            > and pay the duty. If it's small enough to come via the
            > post office or UPS, then it just shows up at your
            > shop with no furthur ado. I don't know why the difference.
            >
            > --Ph. D.
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Gerald Lange
            > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2009 3:32 AM
            > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Metal type updated
            > Certainly can understand the rationale for that, customs clearance and all, though my understanding is that metal type specifically cannot be taxed as import in the USA, constitutional freedom of speech and all, whatever that actually means. Sort of like what exactly does the right to bear arms against an unpopular government mean? Historically; not at all, under any circumstance.
            >
            >
            >
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          • interrobangletterpress
            As a point of reference: I ve not paid duty on type imported from Europe. The four sizes of Gladiola I recently purchased from Stempel showed up via DHL in two
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 1, 2009
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              As a point of reference: I've not paid duty on type imported from Europe.

              The four sizes of Gladiola I recently purchased from Stempel showed up via DHL in two heavy chipboard boxes. Two sizes of Juliet Script arrived 12 years ago via post in a small, heavy wooden crate packed with excelsior.

              The five fonts sent stateside of a custom casting of 10 fonts of 36pt Columna from Bauer needed to be picked up in two large boxes from customs at Logan Airport and after signing my name to the various forms, I walked out with duty free type then as well. The balance of the five fonts were drop-shipped from Barcelona to the five subscribers who help facilitate the casting by placing a deposit. I don't know if any of them were charged a duty, though I suspect not.


              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Ph.D." <phil@...> wrote:
              >
              > In the very early days of the United States republic,
              > Congress enacted a 25% duty on imports of metal
              > type, but no duty at all on matrices. This was to
              > encourage a domestic type founding industry. (See
              > "Irregularities in the Customs Shed" by Paul Duensing,
              > 1984, on Miller & Richard of Scotland's complaints
              > in 1876 that they were being overcharged on the
              > 25% duty.)
              >
              > As far as I know this law still stands. My personal
              > experience has been that if the type comes in a
              > heavy enough box that it must be delivered by common
              > carrier, you will have to go through a customs broker
              > and pay the duty. If it's small enough to come via the
              > post office or UPS, then it just shows up at your
              > shop with no furthur ado. I don't know why the difference.
              >
              > --Ph. D.
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Gerald Lange
              > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2009 3:32 AM
              > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Metal type updated
              > Certainly can understand the rationale for that, customs clearance and all, though my understanding is that metal type specifically cannot be taxed as import in the USA, constitutional freedom of speech and all, whatever that actually means. Sort of like what exactly does the right to bear arms against an unpopular government mean? Historically; not at all, under any circumstance.
              >
              >
              >
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