Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

"Re: [PPLetterpress] rusty trucks"

Expand Messages
  • Paul Pierce
    Here is an old machinist trick thats slow but thorough. Soak your rusty parts in 50% molasses and water for two weeks. If the parts are oily you can wash them
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 19, 2009
      Here is an old machinist trick thats slow but thorough.

      Soak your rusty parts in 50% molasses and water for two weeks. If the parts are oily you can wash them first in detergent or just put a drop of detergent in the mixture.

      This works by reducing the rust back to iron, probably by the sugar in the molasses. It works on any amount of rust (if you soak it long enough) and won't affect the remaining iron at all. (It doesn't put back the iron that turned into rust, though.) When you remove the part, there will be a coating of black iron where the rust was, it washes right off.

      The vinegar and salt method works by creating a low concentration of hydrochloric acid that eats away everything. It works on any corrosion and any metal but eats the metal fastest. Normally you don't lose enough metal to make any difference.

      With any method such as these that involves cleaning all the oil off, you must immediately protect the iron surface or it will start to rust again. Keep the part cold, rinse in cold water, wipe it off or blow with compressed air, and wipe or spray with 3-in-1 (a really good light lubricating oil), WD-40 (a very mediocre all round product) or one of many rust inhibitors.

      Paul Pierce
      (long time lurker)
    • Gerald Lange
      Hi Paul, and welcome. Why would you want to Keep the part cold, rinse in cold water rather than hot water? I day dreamed through too many of my high school
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 19, 2009
        Hi Paul, and welcome.

        Why would you want to "Keep the part cold, rinse in cold water" rather than hot water? I day dreamed through too many of my high school chemistry classes I'm afraid.

        Thanks.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Pierce" <prp@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here is an old machinist trick thats slow but thorough.
        >
        > Soak your rusty parts in 50% molasses and water for two weeks. If the parts are oily you can wash them first in detergent or just put a drop of detergent in the mixture.
        >
        > This works by reducing the rust back to iron, probably by the sugar in the molasses. It works on any amount of rust (if you soak it long enough) and won't affect the remaining iron at all. (It doesn't put back the iron that turned into rust, though.) When you remove the part, there will be a coating of black iron where the rust was, it washes right off.
        >
        > The vinegar and salt method works by creating a low concentration of hydrochloric acid that eats away everything. It works on any corrosion and any metal but eats the metal fastest. Normally you don't lose enough metal to make any difference.
        >
        > With any method such as these that involves cleaning all the oil off, you must immediately protect the iron surface or it will start to rust again. Keep the part cold, rinse in cold water, wipe it off or blow with compressed air, and wipe or spray with 3-in-1 (a really good light lubricating oil), WD-40 (a very mediocre all round product) or one of many rust inhibitors.
        >
        > Paul Pierce
        > (long time lurker)
        >
      • Paul Pierce
        ... I don t remember much of mine either, even though I taught the redox part that should explain how it all works. I ve just been playing with this
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 19, 2009
          > Hi Paul, and welcome.
          >
          > Why would you want to "Keep the part cold, rinse in cold water" rather than hot water? I day dreamed through too many of my high school chemistry classes I'm afraid.

          I don't remember much of mine either, even though I "taught" the redox part that should explain how it all works.

          I've just been playing with this technique. My most recent experiment is using Karo instead of molasses, it doesn't work as well but it did work even though I might have put too much rusty stuff in it. I too thought hot water would be a great way to get the parts clean and get them to dry quickly, but they rust faster than they dry. Not much, and you can just wipe it off of smooth places, but it sort of defeats the purpose. My current technique with the stuff (still) coming out of the bucket of Karo solution (which has been sitting several months now) is to rinse in cold water, pat dry, and spray with WD-40 (because it sprays and I have a can handy.)

          I have also tried soaking rinsed parts in antifreeze, which has a different kind of rust inhibitor in it. I don't recommend this, although nothing bad happened. A next experiment will be to mix some orange oil degreaser into the molasses solution to see if things come out cleaner too.

          My next door neighbor is also playing with de-rusting, he just cleaned up a very rusty belt-buckle like thing using electrolysis in washing soda. It works overnight, or even faster, and is otherwise about the same as the molasses method except you have to set up the variable low voltage DC electricity. Both of us planned to try this, but I was too lazy for the electrolysis and he's not lazy enough for the molasses.

          Paul
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.