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Over-exposure?

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  • Gerald Lange
    Someone asked me what this meant in regard to a printed piece and I was a bit puzzled. The only visibly detectable result of over-exposure on a printed piece
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 18, 2009
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      Someone asked me what this meant in regard to a printed piece and I was a bit puzzled. The only visibly detectable result of over-exposure on a printed piece would be plugging of counters and bridging between adjacent letterforms. (?) These could also be the result of poor presswork nad over indulgent impression but I don't think that was the point of the question.

      Theoretically, continued exposure does not affect surface aperture as much as it builds a shallower subsurface relief structure, not overall but particularly in regard to "relative reverse relief depth," which is fairly standard for letterpress formulated plates, no matter what their thickness.

      I can look at a printed letterpress piece and tell exactly what is technically wrong or right with it, and for the most part, even correctly guess what material was used to print it; but over-exposure is just a bad plate, there is no qualitative measure of too much or too little of this or that, it is either right or it is wrong. And if it is wrong it is quite obvious. (?)

      Gerald
      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
    • Studio On Fire
      Curiously enough, I can do the same trick as Gerald, but I must also taste the printed piece in addition to viewing it. It does seem like while over exposure
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 23, 2009
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        Curiously enough, I can do the same trick as Gerald, but I must also
        taste the printed piece in addition to viewing it.

        It does seem like while over exposure is generally bad, under exposure
        can be a good thing. Specifically in regards to reverse relief depth.
        When we have fine type reversing out of a solid area, a dialed back
        exposure time disallows those reverse areas from building subsurface
        and lets the paper recess into the plate further during printing.
        Makes it easier to ink the plate and hold onto really fine reversing
        details.


        Ben Levitz
        Principal, Design Director

        ---------------


        Studio On Fire

        1621 E Hennepin Ave #226
        Minneapolis MN 55414

        612 379 3000 office
        612 379 3475 fax

        studioonfire.com new blog: beastpieces.com



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Gerald Lange
        Hi Ben Good info on the reverse exposure. You taste the printed piece ? Now is that a high end or a low end comment? Gerald http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 24, 2009
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          Hi Ben

          Good info on the reverse exposure.

          You "taste the printed piece"? Now is that a high end or a low end comment?

          Gerald
          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com




          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Studio On Fire <levitz@...> wrote:
          >
          > Curiously enough, I can do the same trick as Gerald, but I must also
          > taste the printed piece in addition to viewing it.
          >
          > It does seem like while over exposure is generally bad, under exposure
          > can be a good thing. Specifically in regards to reverse relief depth.
          > When we have fine type reversing out of a solid area, a dialed back
          > exposure time disallows those reverse areas from building subsurface
          > and lets the paper recess into the plate further during printing.
          > Makes it easier to ink the plate and hold onto really fine reversing
          > details.
          >
          >
          > Ben Levitz
          > Principal, Design Director
          >
          > ---------------
          >
          >
          > Studio On Fire
          >
          > 1621 E Hennepin Ave #226
          > Minneapolis MN 55414
          >
          > 612 379 3000 office
          > 612 379 3475 fax
          >
          > studioonfire.com new blog: beastpieces.com
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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