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Re: Halftone Letterpress Poster

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  • Gerald Lange
    Ben Nice work. I like it too. And I liked the fact that you provided info on how it was done. Just a little note here. You can sharpen halftones by reducing
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 10 9:31 PM
      Ben

      Nice work. I like it too. And I liked the fact that you provided info on how it was done.

      Just a little note here. You can "sharpen" halftones by reducing the rate of exposure a tad. Especially useful when working with multiple passes.

      Gerald
      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "binarylevitz" <levitz@...> wrote:
      >
      > This was a challenging halftone image we just printed from some pretty big photopolymer plates. A little macabre, but we like it.
      >
      > http://www.beastpieces.com/2009/04/atmosphere-letterpress-poster/
      >
      > Ben
      > Studio On Fire
      >
    • binarylevitz
      Thanks Gerald, Yes, we did some testing strips before doing all the plates full size. Our typical exposure for KF95 plates is 5 minutes, with a 2 minute
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 11 10:35 AM
        Thanks Gerald, Yes, we did some testing strips before doing all the plates full size. Our typical exposure for KF95 plates is 5 minutes, with a 2 minute washout. For these plates we dialed the exposure back to 4.5 minutes with a tad less washout time. That seemed to help the finer values toward 20 percent hold better. A light value at 90 line screen is some delicate plate to wash!

        That said, I'm curious what methods others use for converting and exposing halftones. Any other tips?


        Studio On Fire
      • Gerald Lange
        Ben I ve run 150lpi for reproduction of watercolor images. Mainly to get as far away as possible from a perceptible dot pattern. I am wondering though what
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 13 9:30 PM
          Ben

          I've run 150lpi for reproduction of watercolor images. Mainly to get as far away as possible from a perceptible dot pattern.

          I am wondering though what kind of processing machine you are using? These are unusual exposure/washout rates for Toyobo brand plates. I know exposure is completely dependent upon machine/bulbs/electrics but these seem abnormal to me (Toyobo recommends 14/15 as solid on the Stouffer scale for this plate) but the washout seems rather low. Does 2 minutes leave a clean floor to the plate? I push the exposure and washout to the extreme but I normally run 3 minute exposure, 3.5 minute washout for the KF/KM 95 plates. Any longer than that on exposure and letterform counters start filling. Washout at 3.5 leaves a clean floor with no undercutting, which is what one would want, I'd think. Something I don't know about this? Curious.

          Gerald
          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "binarylevitz" <levitz@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks Gerald, Yes, we did some testing strips before doing all the plates full size. Our typical exposure for KF95 plates is 5 minutes, with a 2 minute washout. For these plates we dialed the exposure back to 4.5 minutes with a tad less washout time. That seemed to help the finer values toward 20 percent hold better. A light value at 90 line screen is some delicate plate to wash!
          >
          > That said, I'm curious what methods others use for converting and exposing halftones. Any other tips?
          >
          > B»
          > Studio On Fire
          >
        • binarylevitz
          Gerald, 150lpi is really high. That is quite the challenge to try sometime. Our shop uses a Jet A2 machine. The KF95 material washes extremely quick, more so
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 24 5:57 AM
            Gerald,

            150lpi is really high. That is quite the challenge to try sometime.

            Our shop uses a Jet A2 machine. The KF95 material washes extremely quick, more so than any other materials we've used. And yes, 2-2.5 minutes does leave a clean floor on the washout. The material really dissolves fast. Even 10-15 seconds of extra wash time can make a big difference it terms of holding firmly fine isolated details.(hairline dotted rules, etc)


            studioonfire.com
            beastpieces.com

            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...> wrote:
            >
            > Ben
            >
            > I've run 150lpi for reproduction of watercolor images. Mainly to get as far away as possible from a perceptible dot pattern.
            >
            > I am wondering though what kind of processing machine you are using? These are unusual exposure/washout rates for Toyobo brand plates. I know exposure is completely dependent upon machine/bulbs/electrics but these seem abnormal to me (Toyobo recommends 14/15 as solid on the Stouffer scale for this plate) but the washout seems rather low. Does 2 minutes leave a clean floor to the plate? I push the exposure and washout to the extreme but I normally run 3 minute exposure, 3.5 minute washout for the KF/KM 95 plates. Any longer than that on exposure and letterform counters start filling. Washout at 3.5 leaves a clean floor with no undercutting, which is what one would want, I'd think. Something I don't know about this? Curious.
            >
            > Gerald
            > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
          • Gerald Lange
            Hi Ben What is your bath temperature reading at these washout rates? Received a recent lot of KM152s that require an extraordinary long washout range. Don t
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 24 7:52 PM
              Hi Ben

              What is your bath temperature reading at these washout rates? Received a recent lot of KM152s that require an extraordinary long washout range. Don't know if this is an unannounced formula change or manufacturer's screwup, neither does the distributor. My A&V rep told me to pop up the temperature (Toyobo specs indicate otherwise). ?

              Gerald


              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "binarylevitz" <levitz@...> wrote:
              >
              > Gerald,
              >
              > 150lpi is really high. That is quite the challenge to try sometime.
              >
              > Our shop uses a Jet A2 machine. The KF95 material washes extremely quick, more so than any other materials we've used. And yes, 2-2.5 minutes does leave a clean floor on the washout. The material really dissolves fast. Even 10-15 seconds of extra wash time can make a big difference it terms of holding firmly fine isolated details.(hairline dotted rules, etc)
              >
              > B»
              > studioonfire.com
              > beastpieces.com
              >
              > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Ben
              > >
              > > I've run 150lpi for reproduction of watercolor images. Mainly to get as far away as possible from a perceptible dot pattern.
              > >
              > > I am wondering though what kind of processing machine you are using? These are unusual exposure/washout rates for Toyobo brand plates. I know exposure is completely dependent upon machine/bulbs/electrics but these seem abnormal to me (Toyobo recommends 14/15 as solid on the Stouffer scale for this plate) but the washout seems rather low. Does 2 minutes leave a clean floor to the plate? I push the exposure and washout to the extreme but I normally run 3 minute exposure, 3.5 minute washout for the KF/KM 95 plates. Any longer than that on exposure and letterform counters start filling. Washout at 3.5 leaves a clean floor with no undercutting, which is what one would want, I'd think. Something I don't know about this? Curious.
              > >
              > > Gerald
              > > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
              >
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