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Re: U.S. type foundries

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  • Mel
    Don t forget Skyline Type! Monotype may be softer than Foundry type, but how many printers today will ever print enough to wear out even Monotype cast type?
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Don't forget Skyline Type!

      Monotype may be softer than Foundry type, but how many printers today
      will ever print enough to wear out even Monotype cast type?


      Mel
    • Lance Williams
      Well, I would for one.... But that is why I have Intertypes and Ludlows... Never have to worry about running out of type or bashing it into uselessness
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 1, 2009
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        Well, I would for one.... But that is why I have Intertypes and Ludlows...
        Never have to worry about running out of type or bashing it into
        uselessness <grin>....

        - Lance Williams
        Williams Stationery Co.
        Camden, New York
        APA #785


        > [Original Message]
        > From: Mel <the_melzer@...>
        > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        > Date: 3/1/2009 2:04:23 PM
        > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: U.S. type foundries
        >
        > Don't forget Skyline Type!
        >
        > Monotype may be softer than Foundry type, but how many printers today
        > will ever print enough to wear out even Monotype cast type?
        >
        >
        > Mel
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Graham and Kathy
        Or better, which is the real point: Last type foundry using hard metal. Graham Moss Incline Press 36 Bow Street Oldham OL1 1SJ England
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 3, 2009
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          Or better, which is the real point: Last type foundry using hard metal.


          Graham Moss

          Incline Press
          36 Bow Street
          Oldham OL1 1SJ England

          http://www.inclinepress.com




          On 1/3/09 15:04, "parallel_imp" <Megalonyx@...> wrote:

          > If Alex had said instead, "last type foundry using foundry casters"
          > that would be more accurate.
        • parallel_imp
          ... Graham, it isn t just a matter of typemetal. The temperature and pressure at which type is cast is just as important to the hardness of type, and thats why
          Message 4 of 18 , Mar 3, 2009
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            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Graham and Kathy
            <kwhalen.incline@...> wrote:
            >
            > Or better, which is the real point: Last type foundry using hard metal.
            >

            Graham, it isn't just a matter of typemetal. The temperature and
            pressure at which type is cast is just as important to the hardness of
            type, and thats why Thompson and Monotype casters don't produce the
            same quality as foundry casters. And it takes foundry mats to stand up
            to that casting environment, not the brass and aluminum mats made for
            Monotype equipment. One could ruin mats and machines by trying to make
            type harder than is normal for the equipment. But wherever any of
            these machines are used is still a type foundry.
            --Eric Holub, SF
          • Graham and Kathy
            No, quite so, it isn t just a matter of the hardness of the metal that defines a foundry, but Dale Guild is still the last foundry in the US using hard metal.
            Message 5 of 18 , Mar 3, 2009
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              No, quite so, it isn't just a matter of the hardness of the metal that
              defines a foundry, but Dale Guild is still the last foundry in the US using
              hard metal. Count your blessings; there's none here.

              As a printer, I'd put hardness of the metal higher than any of the other
              physical attributes in any hierarchy of importance, assuming the face of the
              type wasn't full of bubbles that is!


              Graham Moss

              Incline Press
              36 Bow Street
              Oldham OL1 1SJ England

              http://www.inclinepress.com






              On 3/3/09 14:26, "parallel_imp" <Megalonyx@...> wrote:

              >> Or better, which is the real point: Last type foundry using hard metal.
              >>
              >
              > Graham, it isn't just a matter of typemetal. The temperature and
              > pressure at which type is cast is just as important to the hardness of
              > type, and thats why Thompson and Monotype casters don't produce the
              > same quality as foundry casters. And it takes foundry mats to stand up
              > to that casting environment, not the brass and aluminum mats made for
              > Monotype equipment. One could ruin mats and machines by trying to make
              > type harder than is normal for the equipment. But wherever any of
              > these machines are used is still a type foundry.
              > --Eric Holub, SF
            • typetom@aol.com
              ...Last type foundry using hard metal. ...last type foundry using foundry casters A type foundry is a place where metal is melted and cast in a mold. The
              Message 6 of 18 , Mar 3, 2009
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                ...Last type foundry using hard metal.

                ...last type foundry using foundry casters

                A type foundry is a place where metal is melted and cast in a mold. The
                Monotype system can accurately be described as a complete type foundry.

                Claims of type founders regarding the hardness and quality of their type are
                notoriously suspect. Keystone claimed to be the inventors and sole makers of
                Nickel-Alloy Type. Barnhart Bros & Spindler made Superior Copper Mixed Type.
                The amount of those metals in type was probably negligible. Only a few
                foundries ever actually revealed the proportions of the various metals used in
                their type.

                Type metal varies from soft to hard, to brittle, depending on the relative
                quantities of lead, tin, and antimony. Considering just the inherent hardness
                of the metal, Dale Guild metal is essentially the same as type made from
                recycled ATF metal. So even the occasional casting done here at Denver Back Alley
                Type uses "hard metal." The type offered by Skyline type, also, is cast with
                hard metal, essentially identical to the metal used at Dale Guild.

                The key differences, besides the metal formula, are the casting machines
                involved and the knowledge and attention of the worker, and the protocols being
                followed such as casting speed and temperature and adjustments to the
                machinery. A Barth caster, and a Thompson caster for that matter, will make harder
                type than my antique Monotype because they cast with greater pressure. But I
                expect any type I cast will out-live me.

                While Stephenson Blake described itself as The Last of the Old English Type
                Founders, Mouldtype's monotype was The Best in Any Case. While MacKellar,
                Smiths & Jordan accurately claimed status as the Oldest American Type Foundry,
                anyone who casts type today might honorably be described as Successor to
                Gutenberg and Garamond.

                At Now It's Up To You, we cast type out of thin air.


                Tom Parson/ Now It's Up To You/ Denver Back Alley Type Foundry
                157 S Logan, Denver CO 80209
                (303) 777-8951
                (720) 480-5358 cellphone
                _typetom@..._ (mailto:typetom@...)







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