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Packing videos or photos?

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  • Karen Dufour
    Although the section on Cylinder packing and makeready in your book, Gerald, is perfectly explained, as a new learner to my Vandercook SP-15 I am in need of
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 21, 2009
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      Although the section on "Cylinder packing and makeready" in your book, Gerald, is perfectly explained, as a new learner to my Vandercook SP-15 I am in need of a visual reference to do this correctly. I intend to print on photopolymer plates and on Crane's Lettra #110 for my first run. I have new Vandercook die-cut tympan paper, Kimlon sheets, and Mylar sheets; and an old red pressboard that was on the press when I bought it. Can anyone suggest a series of photos or better yet, videos, to help me set up the packing for a first run? I realize I will be adjusting the packing as needed, but I want to start off on the right foot.Karen
      _________________________________________________________________
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    • Gerald Lange
      Hi Karen Sorry, I don t know of any videos. Probably not the most visually engaging of topics. It s not a very complicated procedure. But get rid of the old
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 21, 2009
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        Hi Karen

        Sorry, I don't know of any videos. Probably not the most visually
        engaging of topics. It's not a very complicated procedure. But get rid
        of the "old" pressboard. You don't want anything with previous
        impression in there.

        Maybe you could visit a local printer or take a workshop?

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Karen Dufour <karendufour@...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        > Although the section on "Cylinder packing and makeready" in your
        book, Gerald, is perfectly explained, as a new learner to my
        Vandercook SP-15 I am in need of a visual reference to do this
        correctly. I intend to print on photopolymer plates and on Crane's
        Lettra #110 for my first run. I have new Vandercook die-cut tympan
        paper, Kimlon sheets, and Mylar sheets; and an old red pressboard that
        was on the press when I bought it. Can anyone suggest a series of
        photos or better yet, videos, to help me set up the packing for a
        first run? I realize I will be adjusting the packing as needed, but I
        want to start off on the right foot.Karen
        > _________________________________________________________________
        > Hotmail® goes where you go. On a PC, on the Web, on your phone.
        >
        http://www.windowslive-hotmail.com/learnmore/versatility.aspx#mobile?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_WL_HM_versatility_121208

        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • michael babcock | interrobang letterpress
        here you go: http://www.flickr.com/photos/interrobang918/2232110886/in/set-72157594423012969/ you should have a pocket thickness gauge in order to do packing
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 25, 2009
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          here you go:

          http://www.flickr.com/photos/interrobang918/2232110886/in/set-72157594423012969/

          you should have a "pocket thickness gauge" in order to do packing correctly.

          --
          best, mjb | interrobangletterpress.com \ linotypesetting.com \
          flickr.com/photos/interrobang918/
        • parallel_imp
          ... wrote: [. . .] ... If that is already at hand, great. But if one goes out to buy something, I d think a 1 outside micrometer would be more
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 27, 2009
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            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "michael babcock | interrobang letterpress"
            <mjb@...> wrote:

            [. . .]

            >you should have a "pocket thickness gauge" in order to do packing correctly.

            If that is already at hand, great. But if one goes out to buy something, I'd think a 1" outside
            micrometer would be more useful (and the imports are cheap on eBay). You can use it to
            measure paper, packing and unmounted plate thickness just as with a pocket thickness
            gauge, but you can also measure base height, type height, mounted plate height etc because
            of the larger throat. Reading the scale may be a challenge, compared to the dial on the
            pocket gauge, but it is easily explained. Many printing manuals give a paragraph or two to
            the subject.
          • Gerald Lange
            Eric and Michael I have one of those Japanese dial gauges. Expensive. And I don t trust it, too many variant readings. I d agree with Eric but buy a high end
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 27, 2009
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              Eric and Michael

              I have one of those Japanese dial gauges. Expensive. And I don't trust
              it, too many variant readings.

              I'd agree with Eric but buy a high end micrometer with ratchet (though I
              picked up a cheap Chinese import recently and it is consistently right
              on the mark). This is one of the first "printing" tools you should buy.
              It will save you a lot of grief.

              Gerald
              http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
              >
              >
              >> you should have a "pocket thickness gauge" in order to do packing correctly.
              >>
              >
              > If that is already at hand, great. But if one goes out to buy something, I'd think a 1" outside
              > micrometer would be more useful (and the imports are cheap on eBay). You can use it to
              > measure paper, packing and unmounted plate thickness just as with a pocket thickness
              > gauge, but you can also measure base height, type height, mounted plate height etc because
              > of the larger throat. Reading the scale may be a challenge, compared to the dial on the
              > pocket gauge, but it is easily explained. Many printing manuals give a paragraph or two to
              > the subject.
              >
              >
            • Jim Camp
              Hey Gerald! I m new here from Phoenix. I was using a wonderful product called Wonderwash there for general clean up...do you know of it? Is there a product
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 27, 2009
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                Hey Gerald!

                I'm new here from Phoenix. I was using a wonderful product called "Wonderwash" there for general clean up...do you know of it? Is there a product available in SoCa you use that's comparable?

                Also, what do you use for your roller wash and your type wash, and is it available locally too?

                Thanks for all your help -- Jim Camp





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jim Camp
                I pulled a total newb move by posting a personal e-mail to the list. Sorry gang! [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 27, 2009
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                  I pulled a total newb move by posting a personal e-mail to the list. Sorry gang!





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Gerald Lange
                  Hi Jim We used to use Wonder Wash at an institution I teach at. I was told it was no longer available, that or there was too much complaint about skin problems
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jan 27, 2009
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                    Hi Jim

                    We used to use Wonder Wash at an institution I teach at. I was told it
                    was no longer available, that or there was too much complaint about skin
                    problems from students and so the admin switched to California Wash.
                    Which is now no longer available in these parts. They are now using
                    something from KellyPaper that comes in a big blue container. Don't
                    recall the name of it but its primary ingrediant is ethanol (this is the
                    answer to environmental concerns!!!). I really don't know what to
                    recommend anymore. For my own work I still use deodorized mineral spirts
                    (paint thinner) as a press wash. You can get this at Home Depot.

                    As far as type and plate washes. I am fairly stocked up on Anchor
                    products but again, they have been discontinued and I no longer know
                    what to recommend. We have found something at KellyPaper that works well
                    but the name of escapes me at the moment. I will find out though and let
                    you know.

                    Lots of continual changes going on in the solvent business these days.

                    Wonder Wash is a little weird. You can put a pool of it over ink on the
                    slab and the ink will just disappear. I wonder where it goes?

                    Good luck

                    Gerald
                    http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


                    Jim Camp wrote:
                    > Hey Gerald!
                    >
                    > I'm new here from Phoenix. I was using a wonderful product called "Wonderwash" there for general clean up...do you know of it? Is there a product available in SoCa you use that's comparable?
                    >
                    > Also, what do you use for your roller wash and your type wash, and is it available locally too?
                    >
                    > Thanks for all your help -- Jim Camp
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Peter Fraterdeus
                    ... Hmmm. One of those mysteries which keeps life interesting ;-) Peter Fraterdeus Almost Free™ Business Cards from Exquisite Letterpress
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jan 27, 2009
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                      On 27 Jan 2009, at 2:19 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

                      >
                      > Wonder Wash is a little weird. You can put a pool of it over ink on
                      > the
                      > slab and the ink will just disappear. I wonder where it goes?
                      >

                      Hmmm. One of those mysteries which keeps life interesting ;-)



                      Peter Fraterdeus
                      Almost Free™ Business Cards from Exquisite Letterpress
                      http://slowprint.com/almostfreelp

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                    • Michael Babcock
                      ... outside ... because ... I wouldn t disagree, and in fact i have both (block leveling well demonstrated on my Flickr stream). I d even advocate finding a
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jan 28, 2009
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                        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "parallel_imp" <Megalonyx@...> wrote:


                        > If that is already at hand, great. But if one goes out to buy something, I'd think a 1"
                        outside
                        > micrometer would be more useful (and the imports are cheap on eBay). You can use it to
                        > measure paper, packing and unmounted plate thickness just as with a pocket thickness
                        > gauge, but you can also measure base height, type height, mounted plate height etc
                        because
                        > of the larger throat. Reading the scale may be a challenge, compared to the dial on the
                        > pocket gauge, but it is easily explained. Many printing manuals give a paragraph or two to
                        > the subject.
                        >

                        I wouldn't disagree, and in fact i have both (block leveling well demonstrated on my Flickr
                        stream). I'd even advocate finding a dial gauge for checking plate thickness. Far easier to read
                        than a micrometer which can be a challenge.

                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/interrobang918/2229331923/

                        That said, the thickness gauge is a bit more ergonomically user friendly for the purpose at
                        hand; taking a reading on paper caliper.

                        mjb
                      • Gerald Lange
                        For anyone looking for a new caliper, Mitutoyo makes some very high end dial calipers. These are so precise they do not recommend storing them with the blades
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jan 28, 2009
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                          For anyone looking for a new caliper, Mitutoyo makes some very high
                          end dial calipers. These are so precise they do not recommend storing
                          them with the blades closed because of the possibility of molecular
                          exchange. You can measure not only plate thickness but flatbase thickness.

                          Gerald
                          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


                          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Babcock" <mjb@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > >
                          >
                          > I wouldn't disagree, and in fact i have both (block leveling well
                          demonstrated on my Flickr
                          > stream). I'd even advocate finding a dial gauge for checking plate
                          thickness. Far easier to read
                          > than a micrometer which can be a challenge.
                          >
                          > http://www.flickr.com/photos/interrobang918/2229331923/
                          >
                          > That said, the thickness gauge is a bit more ergonomically user
                          friendly for the purpose at
                          > hand; taking a reading on paper caliper.
                          >
                          > mjb
                          >
                        • Richard Mathews
                          As some of you already know know, 2009 marks the centennial of the Vandercook Press‹and this 100th birthday has special significance for all of us involved
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jan 29, 2009
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                            As some of you already know know, 2009 marks the centennial of the
                            Vandercook Press‹and this 100th birthday has special significance for all of
                            us involved with letterpress. No single printing press has been more
                            centrally associated with today¹s letterpress book arts revival. As one way
                            of celebrating, the University of Tampa Book Arts Studio is planning an
                            introductory workshop with nationally known Vandercook guru Paul Moxon.

                            http://vandercookpress.info/

                            (Click on ³Webmaster² to see Paul)

                            The full-day workshop will be held Saturday, February 28, at the University
                            of Tampa. Registration is $125, including materials. Enrollment will be
                            limited to ten.

                            Anyone interested in attending should contact the University of Tampa Press
                            by email at utpress@... for further information.

                            -Richard Mathews
                            Director, University of Tampa Press



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