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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re:Caslon Disscussion/Description

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  • Graham and Kathy
    It is in Franklin s own letter to Baskerville, that part of which Baskerville subsequently used as part of the advert to sell the bible he printed (the
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 22, 2008
      It is in Franklin's own letter to Baskerville, that part of which
      Baskerville subsequently used as part of the advert to sell the bible he
      printed (the original full letter is long lost). You'll find it easily
      enough, but check out F. E. Pardoe's biography of John Baskerville,
      available from Oak Knoll Books among others.


      Graham Moss
      Incline Press
      36 Bow Street
      Oldham OL1 1SJ England
      http://www.inclinepress.com




      On 23/10/08 00:00, "Kim Vanderheiden" <paintedtongue@...> wrote:

      > Rick,
      > Back when I was in college and doing a paper on Baskerville, I came
      > across a story about Baskerville and Caslon and Ben Franklin. I'm not
      > sure whence it came.
    • Richard J. Sykes Jr.
      Thank You that will be very useful. Cheers, Rick ... foundry ... need to ... subsequent four ... Dodson,
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 22, 2008
        Thank You that will be very useful.

        Cheers,
        Rick
        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Incline Press
        <books.inclinepress@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > > There are several well-researched articles comparing the different
        foundry
        > > interpretations of Caslon in the typographical annual Matrix ­ you
        need to
        > > find a library with the index for the first 21 copies and the
        subsequent four
        > > or five issues. Also somewhere in there is an article about Alan
        Dodson,
        > > typographer, who used Caslon exclusively I think.
        > >
        > Graham Moss
        >
        >
        > Incline Press
        > 36 Bow Street
        > Oldham OL1 1SJ England
        > http://www.inclinepress.com
        >
        >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > First time poster here, and figured this might be a good opener post.
        > > I am doing a research paper on Caslon typeface for my Typography
        > > class, I have amassed a fair amount of resources but figured I might
        > > also throw in the hat here. Looking for anything on the history of the
        > > typeface (Not the Creator) that may be interesting and useful in a
        > > research paper. I also and more importantly wanted to obtain some
        > > usable quotes from current typographers/designers as to what they feel
        > > are the elements of Caslons anatomy which most often identify it, and
        > > what they feel its uses and or limitations as a typeface are.
        > > Thank you in advance for any responses to this topic.
        > > Rick
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Richard J. Sykes Jr.
        Thats kinda a neat story, I will have to see if I can find any further documentation on it. Thank you. Cheers, Rick
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 22, 2008
          Thats kinda a neat story, I will have to see if I can find any further
          documentation on it. Thank you.

          Cheers,
          Rick

          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Kim Vanderheiden
          <paintedtongue@...> wrote:
          >
          > Rick,
          > Back when I was in college and doing a paper on Baskerville, I came
          > across a story about Baskerville and Caslon and Ben Franklin. I'm not
          > sure whence it came. It's only a light story and probably is not
          > suitable for your paper. But it's sort of fun, so here it is, as I
          > recall it, anyway.
          >
          > When John Baskerville developed his Baskerville font, he spent many
          > years and much care trying to make it perfect and the most easy to
          > read of any of the fonts of his time. However, when he released it to
          > the public, he was soundly thrashed. People strongly preferred Caslon
          > and insisted Caslon was far easier to read, and that John Baskerville
          > was pretty much an idiot. Some even went so far as to declare that
          > reading in Baskerville would cause one to go blind! Well, Ben Franklin
          > knew hogwash when he heard it. When some such Caslon affectionado was
          > in his office ranting about foul Baskerville making one blind, good
          > ol' Ben gave him a page to read that was set in Caslon and another
          > page that was set in Baskerville. He didn't identify which was which
          > and asked the other gentleman to tell him which was the clearer and
          > more legible typeface. As I'm sure you can guess, the gentleman's
          > choice was Baskerville. Ouch! Too bad I don't think that recognition
          > made it to John Baskerville in his lifetime. Caslon continued to be
          > the dominant typeface, and John Baskerville continued to live in poor
          > repute.
          >
          > - or so the story went, anyway. . .
          >
          > Kim Vanderheiden
          > Painted Tongue Press
          >
          > Caslon Disscussion/Description
          > Posted by: "Richard J. Sykes Jr." yorick220@... yorick220
          > Tue Oct 21, 2008 12:04 pm (PDT)
          >
          > First time poster here, and figured this might be a good opener post.
          > I am doing a research paper on Caslon typeface for my Typography
          > class, I have amassed a fair amount of resources but figured I might
          > also throw in the hat here. Looking for anything on the history of the
          > typeface (Not the Creator) that may be interesting and useful in a
          > research paper. I also and more importantly wanted to obtain some
          > usable quotes from current typographers/designers as to what they feel
          > are the elements of Caslons anatomy which most often identify it, and
          > what they feel its uses and or limitations as a typeface are.
          > Thank you in advance for any responses to this topic.
          > Rick
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • billousek
          Rick I have an article on Caslon by Allan Halley, author of The ABC s of Type and resident type guru at Monotype Imaging. I can photocopy and send to you if
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 24, 2008
            Rick
            I have an article on Caslon by Allan Halley, author of 'The ABC's of
            Type' and resident type guru at Monotype Imaging. I can photocopy and
            send to you if you PM me your address.
            Bill
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