Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Pin registering...

Expand Messages
  • Gerald Lange
    Ray Going back a bit to this. Bunting Magnetics supplies, as an option, pin registration with its bases. It s not cheap, nor are the bases, nor is the device
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 4, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Ray

      Going back a bit to this. Bunting Magnetics supplies, as an option,
      pin registration with its bases. It's not cheap, nor are the bases,
      nor is the device used for cutting the holes in the plate. I think
      this was commonplace in industrial practice and may be still. I don't
      have a lot of contact with the commercial industry part of all of
      this. But it is still out there.

      I think Bradley Hutchinson had/has some kind of pin registration
      system set up with Patmags. Everything has to be extra-ordinarily
      precise and standardized for this to prove itself. If, with such a
      system, however, you are a point off, well, and remaining in deference
      to our DIY friends, it's pointless. :—)

      Gerald
      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Ray Nichols <ray@...> wrote:
      >
      > Has anyone ever tried to make photopolymer plates using some kind of
      > pin registration system like offset (did or does) to register colors?
      >
      > . . .
      >
      > Ray Nichols
      > Lead Graffiti
      >
      > . . .
      >
      > http://leadgraffiti.com
      >
    • parallel_imp
      ... [. . .] ... BASF also had a pin registration system for their Nylospeed plates, with plates punched and also bent over at the lead edge, and Bunting-like
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 4, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...> wrote:
        >
        > Going back a bit to this. Bunting Magnetics supplies, as an option,
        > pin registration with its bases. It's not cheap, nor are the bases,
        > nor is the device used for cutting the holes in the plate. I think
        > this was commonplace in industrial practice and may be still.
        [. . .]
        > Everything has to be extra-ordinarily
        > precise and standardized for this to prove itself. If, with such a
        > system, however, you are a point off, well, and remaining in
        > deference to our DIY friends, it's pointless. :—)

        BASF also had a pin registration system for their Nylospeed plates,
        with plates punched and also bent over at the lead edge, and
        Bunting-like base units. Of course, precision (and planning) is
        required in every step from light-table to press-bed.
        My own method is not quite so precise in hole location, but since
        the pins themselves are individual units rather than pinbars, I can
        adjust position by moving a single pin within the lockup. The pins can
        also be positioned anywhere that suits the job (head, tail, sides),
        for plates of various sizes. The 18 pt. x .854" high-base that holds
        the pins also has the benefit of supporting plates that overhang the
        PatMag slightly.
        --Eric Holub, SF
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.