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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: How Heavy is a Linotype?

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  • Lamsland
    Great photo, thanks all for the info so far keep it coming. dumb question, and it s faster for my to type the question than to google the answer, how tall is
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 11, 2008
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      Great photo, thanks all for the info so far keep it coming.

      dumb question, and it's faster for my to type the question than to
      google the answer, how tall is a linotype?

      FYI, I'm trying to save one plus mats and a kluge from the scrap yard.



      On Sep 11, 2008, at 1:13 PM, nagraph1 wrote:

      > I don't know the weight, but we just moved our model 31 using a pallet
      > jack--legs were lag screwed to 4x4s--and then a fork lift out to a
      > trailer, then fork lift again off a trailer, but I would never ever
      > consider using the lift gate of any body's truck for a machine like
      > the
      > linotype. The machine, depending on model, weighs in more than the
      > capacity of most or all of the tail gates, plus they usually have a
      > downward slant. Here's a link to a picture of the machine being moved
      > into its new location:
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Andy Keck
      I moved an Intertype into my garage just a few months ago, so the pain (just kidding, mostly) is still fresh. As noted by others , I have not seen a lift gate
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 11, 2008
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        I moved an Intertype into my garage just a few months ago, so the pain
        (just kidding, mostly) is still fresh. As noted by others , I have not
        seen a lift gate yet that I would trust in this application, both
        because of the top heavy nature of these machines and the fact that
        most lift gates seem to have a noticeable slope under heavy operation.

        My move was made much easier than I had expected though because a
        previous owner had made two caster frames that bolted to the legs.
        Getting the machine on and off the trailer was still a little sticky
        due to the slight step and the change in angle, but once the Intertype
        was on flat ground, two guys could push it easily. Amazingly enough,
        one guy could move it, although it required additional grunting and
        cursing.

        Take a look at these photos to see what I mean:

        http://web.mac.com/andykeck/_DSC2298.jpg
        http://web.mac.com/andykeck/DSC_2301.jpg

        --
        Andy Keck
        1206 25th Ave E
        Seattle, WA 98112

        Mobile: 206 390 3870
        andykeck@...



        On Sep 11, 2008, at 7:35 AM, Lamsland wrote:

        > How heavy is a linotype? Can one be skidded and moved with a pallet
        > jack then taken off a truck on a lift gate?
        >
        > Matthew "LAMMY" Lamoureux
        > Full Metal Press - Operis servo a specialis nundinae
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • parallel_imp
        ... My Model 14 is roughly 78 with the pig feeder off.
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 11, 2008
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          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Lamsland <lamsland1@...> wrote:

          >, how tall is a linotype?
          >

          My Model 14 is roughly 78" with the pig feeder off.
        • Halton
          To prepare a linecaster for a move rotate the machine so that the mold disk is forward on the locking studs and place a 2x4 block wedged behind the crucible so
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 12, 2008
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            To prepare a linecaster for a move rotate the machine so that the mold disk is forward on the locking studs and place a 2x4 block wedged behind the crucible so it can't move.
            It will then be safe to move.
            Joe Halton

            --- On Thu, 9/11/08, parallel_imp <Megalonyx@...> wrote:
            From: parallel_imp <Megalonyx@...>
            Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: How Heavy is a Linotype?
            To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, September 11, 2008, 10:03 AM











            --- In PPLetterpress@ yahoogroups. com, Lamsland <lamsland1@. ..> wrote:

            >

            > How heavy is a linotype? Can one be skidded and moved with a pallet

            > jack then taken off a truck on a lift gate?

            >

            Lammy, a lift gate is inadequate. Tipping is a real possibility even

            if the rated weight seems OK. Maybe a more stable rail lift might

            handle it, but the safest way is to rent a hydraulic drop trailer. A

            well-built custom skid is preferable to a used one. You don't want

            anything collapsing in transit.

            What model? I think the simplest Model 5 might weigh about 1750

            without magazine and an empty pot. But added options and more

            complicated models can weigh much more. Be sure you understand how to

            remove the magazine (and lock it) before attempting or mats will spill

            everywhere.

            --Eric Holub, SF


























            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Lamsland
            Thank you very much for that info. I just came back from looking at what s there so excuse my giddyness some. . . . First I will say it saddens and sickens me
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 13, 2008
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              Thank you very much for that info.

              I just came back from looking at what's there so excuse my giddyness
              some. . . .

              First I will say it saddens and sickens me to see a printer like this
              going out of business. I don't know if anyone on this list from NY/
              New England will remember but this used to be PM Typesetting many
              moons ago. All they did was set hot metal for other printers. At one
              time they had more than 4 linotypes.

              I wasn't able to see what model of linotype it was as the lighting
              was bad and it was mostly covered with a tarp and "stuff". All I know
              is it's intact, was working, has a full magazine loaded and is all
              electric, no gas.

              There is also a Kluge there, about 10 x 12, A smaller windmill, A
              smaller KS with no ink train but with the ink cases still there, a 4'
              x 5' free standing stone, a challange cutter with the metal tape,
              and about 2 dozen mats for the Lino.

              We were hoping the owner would show but he didn't so the guy I was
              with is going to pass on what I said about things. So it's wait and
              see some more. First and for most I'd like to see the equipment
              preserved and not scrapped. I would like to start a printing museum
              with demonstrations and classes as there really is non in
              Connecticut, but have no idea or money to know where to start. If my
              tugging on this guys hearts strings plus the reality of there not
              being a very large market for this equipment convinces him to let me
              take if for nothing, I still have the issue of moving and storing it.
              As much as I'd like to have it all to "play" with, I may be back on
              here offing up to whom ever can save it.


              Matthew "LAMMY" Lamoureux
              Full Metal Press - Operis servo a specialis nundinae

              On Sep 12, 2008, at 10:05 PM, Halton wrote:

              > To prepare a linecaster for a move rotate the machine so that the
              > mold disk is forward on the locking studs and place a 2x4 block
              > wedged behind the crucible so it can't move.
              > It will then be safe to move.
              > Joe Halton
              >
              > --- On Thu, 9/11/08, parallel_imp <Megalonyx@...> wrote:
              > From: parallel_imp <Megalonyx@...>
              > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: How Heavy is a Linotype?
              > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Thursday, September 11, 2008, 10:03 AM
              >
              > --- In PPLetterpress@ yahoogroups. com, Lamsland <lamsland1@. ..>
              > wrote:
              >
              > >
              >
              > > How heavy is a linotype? Can one be skidded and moved with a pallet
              >
              > > jack then taken off a truck on a lift gate?
              >
              > >
              >
              > Lammy, a lift gate is inadequate. Tipping is a real possibility even
              >
              > if the rated weight seems OK. Maybe a more stable rail lift might
              >
              > handle it, but the safest way is to rent a hydraulic drop trailer. A
              >
              > well-built custom skid is preferable to a used one. You don't want
              >
              > anything collapsing in transit.
              >
              > What model? I think the simplest Model 5 might weigh about 1750
              >
              > without magazine and an empty pot. But added options and more
              >
              > complicated models can weigh much more. Be sure you understand how to
              >
              > remove the magazine (and lock it) before attempting or mats will spill
              >
              > everywhere.
              >
              > --Eric Holub, SF
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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