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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: collotype

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  • Gerald Lange
    Erik Great pics. Those are some mighty handsome presses. Looking around that massive shop are all the answers. Tools, materials, chemicals, equipment, all
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 4 10:03 AM
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      Erik

      Great pics. Those are some mighty handsome presses. Looking around that
      massive shop are all the answers. Tools, materials, chemicals,
      equipment, all specific to the work at hand. Amazing. That pile of press
      blankets, the gathering of containers for the chemicals, the auxiliary
      equipment. . . Thanks for sending that. I'd think it would not take any
      great stretch of the imagination to understand that any work undertaken
      there is going to make collotype on any other kind of press look like a
      noble DIY project at best.

      Gerald

      Erik Desmyter wrote:
      >> Essentially, its single line pressure is inadequate and
      >> its singular direction force will tend to rip the collotype
      >> matrix off of its base. Not so good. You simply can't
      >> get the kind of uniform pressure required as from an
      >> iron hand platen press.
      >>
      >
      >
      > What is the difference with the large cylinderpresses which were used at the
      > time (see examples in the tour on the website below)? These presses were
      > very close to stone-litho cylinderpresses but the pressure is also on a line
      > as it is a cylinderpress.
      >
      > http://www.lichtdruckwerkstatt.de/my_html/e_home.htm
      >
      > Regards,
      > Erik
      >
      >
      >
    • Erik Desmyter
      To make a bridge to PP see page 5 of Paul Thirkell s (Centre for Fine Print Research in Bristol, UK) 2006 paper on The hybridization of 19th century continuous
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 10 2:28 AM
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        To make a bridge to PP see page 5 of Paul Thirkell's (Centre for Fine Print
        Research in Bristol, UK) 2006 paper on The hybridization of 19th century
        continuous tone printing processes with digital imaging techniques to assist
        contemporary fine art and facsimile printing.

        http://amd.uwe.ac.uk/cfpr/files/Printing%20Technology%20SPb'06.pdf

        Continuous tone photopolymer gravure:
        A new form of continuous tone printing developed by Eli Ponsaing in Finland
        has broadened the scope for creating photographic images in ink. This method
        employs a commercial steel backed, photopolymer coated plate. The plate is
        exposed first to a continuous tone positive film image and then to a fine
        random dot screen. Aligning both exposures to penetrate the same depth into
        the polymer substrate allows a pitted, vary depth intaglio surface to be
        created on the plate during development.

        the paper also gives some info on what still existed on collotype 2 years
        ago

        Regards,
        Erik

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...>
        To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, August 04, 2008 7:03 PM
        Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: collotype


        Erik

        Great pics. Those are some mighty handsome presses. Looking around that
        massive shop are all the answers. Tools, materials, chemicals,
        equipment, all specific to the work at hand. Amazing. That pile of press
        blankets, the gathering of containers for the chemicals, the auxiliary
        equipment. . . Thanks for sending that. I'd think it would not take any
        great stretch of the imagination to understand that any work undertaken
        there is going to make collotype on any other kind of press look like a
        noble DIY project at best.

        Gerald

        Erik Desmyter wrote:
        >> Essentially, its single line pressure is inadequate and
        >> its singular direction force will tend to rip the collotype
        >> matrix off of its base. Not so good. You simply can't
        >> get the kind of uniform pressure required as from an
        >> iron hand platen press.
        >>
        >
        >
        > What is the difference with the large cylinderpresses which were used at
        > the
        > time (see examples in the tour on the website below)? These presses were
        > very close to stone-litho cylinderpresses but the pressure is also on a
        > line
        > as it is a cylinderpress.
        >
        > http://www.lichtdruckwerkstatt.de/my_html/e_home.htm
        >
        > Regards,
        > Erik
        >
        >
        >


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