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9809Re: Material for Platemaker

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  • sfprinter
    May 24, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Jessica Spring <springtide@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I've also had good results cutting up self-healing mats (back in the
      days of
      > keylining, we covered our worktables with this stuff that comes in
      rolls).
      > They cut well with exacto knife or scissors, mount easily to MDF
      with carpet
      > tape, and hold solids really well. Offset blankets work similarly.
      > --Jessica
      >
      > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
      > Jessica Spring
      > SPRINGTIDE PRESS
      > http://www.springtidepress.com
      > 253.627.8629
      > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
      >
      >
      > > From: "Casey McGarr" <casey@...>
      > > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Sat, 24 May 2008 18:15:54 -0000
      > > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Material for Platemaker
      > >
      > > Gerald,
      > >
      > > Yes, a bit more organic. A roll of rubylith is pretty cheap so it
      wouldn't be
      > > costly to
      > > experiment. My wife also does illustrations and I thought this may
      be a good
      > > medium for
      > > both of use.
      > >
      > > It certainly cannot replace fine printing of typography but rather
      another
      > > medium could be interesting.
      > >
      > > A friend of mine Dirk Fowler uses gasket material to make images
      (not using
      > > photopolymer) and then mounts it to a particle board and prints.
      He does great
      > > poster
      > > work. He also said he'll cut up cheap place mats and mount to a base.
      > > http://www.f2-
      > > design.com/.
      > >
      > > Thanks for the information Gerald, I keep you posted.
      > >
      > > Casey
      > >
      > >
      > >>
      > >> Casey
      > >>
      > >> I use Rubylith and Amberlith for masking out elements (for different
      > >> exposure times of different elements from the same film negative)
      so I
      > >> assume you could. Don't know how the exposed area of the photopolymer
      > >> would react naked to the Kreene but it wouldn't take long to find
      out.
      > >> Are thinking of a paper cut look to the images?
      > >>
      > >> Gerald
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      Here is a link to Ruby we cut for screen printing.
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/solsken/sets/72157602809668427/
      Screen printing uses a film positive so you leave the Ruby where you
      want to print vs Letterpress where you would open the ruby where you
      wanted to create a printing mark. We use a plotter designed for
      cutting vinyl signs to cut the ruby, so any vector based file can be
      cut, since screen printing is less expensive per square inch/foot the
      ruby is a bargain vs. film. for simple relief plates we can cut an
      adhesive backed material used in sandblasting signs, this can be cut
      on the plotter or used like linoleum and cut with gouges. A recent
      show at SF Center for the Book had prints from plates that where the
      artist scratched onto exposed film, a look very much like drypoint, we
      routinely have film scraps that could be experimented with this
      technique. One other painterly technique that I use for photo intaglio
      is photocopier toner mixed with Future floor wax (a liquid acrylic)
      this is painted onto drafting film then exposed to the plates, however
      the intaglio is again a film positive vs negative process we usually
      use for letterpress plates.
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