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12716Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: COMMENTS ON LEAD OXIDE.....AND OTHER PRINT SHOP TOXINS

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  • Chad Pastotnik
    Jul 12, 2011
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      Very useful tidbit of info for me as well. I started out (and still do) intaglio printing - engraving and mezzotint on copper and always make my own ink for editions. I've made ink for letterpress also but a very fine grain pigment must be used or expect to spend a lot of time mulling the ink. Letting it age for a week to months in advance is of great benefit also as it allows the linseed to fully saturate the pigments.

      Best way to get good earthtones, better than any PMS selection or similar offering from ink suppliers, just use the natural raw pigment like the days of old. I am also fond of Graphic Chemical's intaglio ink formulas and have modified them to work with letterpress as well in the past.

      Chad
      ___________________________
      Chad Pastotnik
      Deep Wood Press 231.587.0506
      http://www.deepwoodpress.com

      On Jul 12, 2011, at 12:13 AM, Gerald Lange wrote:

      > Nick
      >
      > Just interested in the origins of printing and typography. Helps me understand the basics. How about you?
      >
      > Gerald
      >
      > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Nick Smith <nas1000@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> And what were the metal workers doing with ink?
      >>
      >> Nick
      >>
      >> On 11/07/2011 08:32, Erik Desmyter wrote:
      >>>
      >>> Hi Gerald,
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> do you have any historical references to your below quote linking
      >>> Gutenberg to metal workers in Flanders? Or what is the source of this
      >>> info?
      >>>
      >>> Best regards,
      >>> Erik
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> Op 11-jul-2011, om 05:54 heeft Gerald Lange het volgende geschreven:
      >>>>>
      >>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      >>>>> <mailto:PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@> wrote:
      >>>>>> ... The brilliant blacks of every Gutenberg Bible I have ever seen
      >>>>>> (two) is quite amazing, some five and a half centuries after. He,
      >>>>>> of course, did not invent the formula but rather appropriated it
      >>>>>> for better use from some metal workers in Flanders. He was a genius
      >>>>>> at appropriating.
      >>>
      >>>
      >>
      >>
      >> --
      >> Nicholas Smith
      >> Rare Books Dept - University Library
      >> West Rd, Cambridge CB3 9DR UK
      >> (0)1223 333123
      >>
      >
      >
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