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12709Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: COMMENTS ON LEAD OXID..AND OTHER PRINT SHOP TOXINS

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  • Fritz Klinke
    Jul 11 12:21 PM
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      While Gerald’s contributions to the Wikipedia listing on letterpress can be readily detected as far as his interests and knowledge lie, some of the other stuff is of dubious value. As an example, the text under Industrial-scale use in the 20th Century uses the term oscillating for what I assume was a flat bed cylinder press and then attempts to describe a stereotype plate used on rotary newspaper presses and completely ignores any other rotary press used in both sheet fed and web fed letterpress presses that dominated 60 or more years of letterpress work that used plates other than stereotypes, mainly electrotypes, and also included photopolymer. A sketchy and poorly done listing. The video cited as one of three examples of letterpress is a really poor choice http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YX7QBE3nYVY, and while maybe something is better than nothing, the entire letterpress listing despite Gerald’s contributions is lacking in overall information in my opinion. And no, I have no interest in adding to the listing—I think Wikipedia is my next to last choice for reliable information.
       
      Fritz
       
      Sent: Monday, July 11, 2011 12:03 AM
      Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: COMMENTS ON LEAD OXIDE…..AND OTHER PRINT SHOP TOXINS
       
       

      Oh indeed. Totally suspect. Here is the Wikepedia reference on letterpress.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letterpress_printing

      How self serving is this? If you have been round and about you can even identify the me me culprits.

      Gerald
      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

      --- In mailto:PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...> wrote:

      >
      > Stan
      >
      >
      Lazily, this is a wikepedia reference to the paint comments:
      >
      >
      href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_paint">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_paint
      >
      > Gerald
      >
      href="http://BielerPress.blogspot.com">http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In
      href="mailto:PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com">mailto:PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com, "okintertype" <spthompson@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Well,
      technically speaking, white lead is basic lead carbonate. White lead was already obsolete as a paint pigment by the time I got into the business (1957). Titanium Dioxide had been developed as a much superior replacement.
      > >
      Stan
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In
      href="mailto:PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com">mailto:PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi
      Steve
      > > >
      > > > Nice tome. Couple of things. I was
      once corrected for using the term lead carbonate as being incorrect. Not sure if it is or isn't. White lead is good enough for me.
      > > >
      > > > At any rate, last information I have is that this is actually legal to
      use in paint in the US, up to 5% for paint you will find in the hardware store, and unlimited for use on highways, parking lots, by the military. It actually provides preservative qualities to the paint. And yes, Mr. Gutenberg used quite a bit of it in his ink, the formula for which he took to his grave. Modern technology though has figured out a way to identify everything he ever printed simply because of the molecular composition of the ink used. The brilliant blacks of every Gutenberg Bible I have ever seen (two) is quite amazing, some five and a half centuries after. He, of course, did not invent the formula but rather appropriated it for better use from some metal workers in Flanders. He was a genius at appropriating.
      > > >
      > > > By the way,
      there is a great early 20th century book titled Lead and Zinc Pigments that details quite exhaustively the way the industry produced this stuff. The photos of the very young workers is quite tragic. Horrible working conditions, especially considering what we know now.
      > > >
      > > >
      Gerald
      > > >
      href="http://BielerPress.blogspot.com">http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
      > > >
      > >
      >

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