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12707Re: COMMENTS ON LEAD OXIDE…..AND OTHER PRINT SHOP TOXINS

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  • okintertype
    Jul 11, 2011
      My comments were specifically about white lead. We also used what was called a "red lead primer." It was an excellent material and gave us 20-30 year's performance in many cases. I specified it as long as I was on the job (til 1986). Our painters who applied this primer in all cases tested out no higher than the general population. It has been claimed that in order for red lead to be a good exterior primer it has to be mostly insoluble. Thus is not absorbed by the body as much as some other lead compounds.

      Don't ask me any more chemistry questions. I've been retired 18 years. :}
      Stan


      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...> wrote:
      >
      > Stan
      >
      > Lazily, this is a wikepedia reference to the paint comments:
      >
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_paint
      >
      > Gerald
      > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "okintertype" <spthompson@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Well, technically speaking, white lead is basic lead carbonate. White lead was already obsolete as a paint pigment by the time I got into the business (1957). Titanium Dioxide had been developed as a much superior replacement.
      > > Stan
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi Steve
      > > >
      > > > Nice tome. Couple of things. I was once corrected for using the term lead carbonate as being incorrect. Not sure if it is or isn't. White lead is good enough for me.
      > > >
      > > > At any rate, last information I have is that this is actually legal to use in paint in the US, up to 5% for paint you will find in the hardware store, and unlimited for use on highways, parking lots, by the military. It actually provides preservative qualities to the paint. And yes, Mr. Gutenberg used quite a bit of it in his ink, the formula for which he took to his grave. Modern technology though has figured out a way to identify everything he ever printed simply because of the molecular composition of the ink used. The brilliant blacks of every Gutenberg Bible I have ever seen (two) is quite amazing, some five and a half centuries after. He, of course, did not invent the formula but rather appropriated it for better use from some metal workers in Flanders. He was a genius at appropriating.
      > > >
      > > > By the way, there is a great early 20th century book titled Lead and Zinc Pigments that details quite exhaustively the way the industry produced this stuff. The photos of the very young workers is quite tragic. Horrible working conditions, especially considering what we know now.
      > > >
      > > > Gerald
      > > > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
      > > >
      > >
      >
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