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12648Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Shelf Life for Photopolymer plates

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  • Ed Inman
    Jun 18, 2011
      Gerald is an accomplished printer who often gives great advice, but he has also been heralding the end of film (and generally antagonistic about its future) since day one on this list. So anything he proclaims about film "going bad" in 6 months to a year needs to be considered in that light.

      There have, in fact, been no "very recent governmental regulations" to "greatly reduce" the life of any silver based black & white film negatives. At least none that have appeared on the Analog Photography Users Group or other professional photography sites where people actually know something about photo chemistry.

      Has film gotten more expensive? Yes. Is film indestructible? No. But most properly-processed silver based lith film negatives stored in a cool, dry environment will easily last 100 years, and a whole new generation is learning to appreciate the value of (and guarantee the future of) traditional camera films of all types:

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/retailandconsumer/8525839/Traditional-camera-film-makes-a-come-back.html

      Ed



      -----Original Message-----
      >From: Eric <Megalonyx@...>

      >Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Shelf Life for Photopolymer plates

      >--- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> 3) The old mantra was "save your negs." This is no longer valid. Very recent governmental regulations and changes in film chemistry have greatly reduced the longevity of film negatives. I see film negs going bad between six months to a year. And I have perfectly fine film negatives that are well over a decade old.
      >
      >Do you think this is true for all graphic arts film, or just the RA film used in imagesetting? Are they getting rid of the silver? It should be that silver emulsion properly fixed and properly rinsed would be permanent. Machine-processed film would not have the same duration of fix and especially rinse that tray-developed film could.
      >--Eric Holub, SF
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