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11349Re: OT: Print estimate software?

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  • bielerpr
    Jan 23, 2010
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      I'd agree, somewhat, I have certain hourly rates for different aspects of the work, and make my estimates/assumptions based on past experience. For supplies and materials, minimal Excel or just a calculator, usually the latter. I don't like to waste a lot of time on estimating. Sometimes you make a little, sometimes you lose a little. But it seems to me a great waste of time to devote an awful lot of money and time to this (re: investing in specialized software). Better approach, talk to your clients, invest some time in them, become their friends (really; not just because they represent money to you).

      Note though, that this is a small scale, fairly intimate approach to the issue, not a rote approach. Tom mentions the "pleasures." Well, hell yeah, anything less and you might as well be selling shoes. Letterpress is more than just doing it, it's sharing it.


      Gerald
      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com




      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@...> wrote:
      >
      > Often, even with software, by the time you've estimated a job this
      > way and that way and three more what-if's, you've spent more time on
      > the estimate than on the job itself.
      >
      > Software should help, but I've found that a flat rate that's easy for
      > anyone to calculate encourages quicker decisions by the customer.
      > which I believe is saving me time.
      >
      > --Scott
      >
      > On Jan 23, 2010, at 10:07 AM, typetom@... wrote:
      >
      > > For a completely different approach to print estimates:
      > >
      > > I use a flat rate based solely on how many set-ups or print-runs are
      > > involved. My time is in the set up, not the number of copies; I
      > > have to mix and
      > > match ink, and clean the press, in any case. Use of hand-set type
      > > or the
      > > cost for making photopolymer plates are included as well -
      > > essentially a
      > > trade-off of pleasures and expenses either way, which I'd rather
      > > not calculate.
      > > Over time and numerous jobs, it all balances out ok, some things
      > > involving
      > > more effort, some less.
      > >
      > > Of course the cost of paper stock is separate and depends on
      > > quantity and
      > > the actual cost of the paper involved. Any shipping is extra at cost.
      > >
      > > If I'm unhappy with the way this works for me, then I would need
      > > to adjust
      > > the rate to make it feel right. I have saved hours, if not months,
      > > of time
      > > and bookkeeping frustration by this approach. No software necessary.
      > >
      > > Enjoy,
      > > Tom
      > >
      > >
      > > Tom Parson/ Now It's Up To You
      > > 157 S Logan, Denver CO 80209
      > > (303) 777-8951 - home & letterpress printshop
      > > (720) 480-5358 - cranky cellphone
      > > _typetom@..._ (mailto:typetom@...)
      > > _www.froglok.com/typetom_ (http://www.froglok.com/typetom/) (way
      > > out of
      > > date website!)
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
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