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Re: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

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  • Sidney Stoffels
    John O,   Thank you! It reminds of an old CSN song, Find the cost of Freedom buried in the ground . I  reread the Declaration of Independence yesterday
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 5, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      John O,
        Thank you! It reminds of an old CSN song, "Find the cost of Freedom buried in the ground". I  reread the Declaration of Independence yesterday morning. and the phrase "life, liberty, and the PURSUIT of happiness". Pursuit is an action word

      --- On Thu, 7/5/12, deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...> wrote:

      From: deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...>
      Subject: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson
      To: "PNLHmembers" <PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Thursday, July 5, 2012, 9:03 PM

       

      Dear PNLH friends,

       

      The forwarded email message below is not about Lewis and Clark, but about our Founding Fathers.  I hope that you will find it worthwhile.

       

      Best wishes,

      John O.


      Subject: Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

       
       

       


      Subject: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

       

       Happy 4th

       

       
       Humbling Independence Day History Lesson:

       

       

       
       Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men
       who signed the Declaration of Independence?

       
       Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,
       and tortured before they died.

       
       Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
       Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army;
       another had two sons captured.

       
       Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or
       hardships of the Revolutionary War.

       
       They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
       and their sacred honor.

       
       What kind of men were they?

       
       Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
       Eleven were merchants,
       nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
       men of means, well educated,
       but they signed the Declaration of Independence
       knowing full well that the penalty would be death if
       they were captured.
       Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and
       trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the
       British Navy. He sold his home and properties to
       pay his debts, and died in rags.

       
       Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
       that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
       He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
       was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him,
       and poverty was his reward.

       
       Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
       Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

       
       At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that
       the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson
       home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
       George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed,
       and Nelson died bankrupt.

       
       Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
       The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

       
       John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
       Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill
       were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests
       and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his
       children vanished.
       So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
       silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.

       
       Remember: freedom is never free!

       
       I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many
       people as you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism
       is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games. 


       

       

       

       



    • Sidney Stoffels
      Sorry,   My computer send unfinished draft. Thanks again John for reminding us to remember why we celebrate July 4th. Sid ... From: Sidney Stoffels
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 5, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Sorry,
          My computer send unfinished draft. Thanks again John for reminding us to remember why we celebrate July 4th.
        Sid

        --- On Thu, 7/5/12, Sidney Stoffels <sidstoffels@...> wrote:

        From: Sidney Stoffels <sidstoffels@...>
        Subject: Re: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson
        To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, July 5, 2012, 9:27 PM

         

        John O,
          Thank you! It reminds of an old CSN song, "Find the cost of Freedom buried in the ground". I  reread the Declaration of Independence yesterday morning. and the phrase "life, liberty, and the PURSUIT of happiness". Pursuit is an action word

        --- On Thu, 7/5/12, deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...> wrote:

        From: deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...>
        Subject: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson
        To: "PNLHmembers" <PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Thursday, July 5, 2012, 9:03 PM

         

        Dear PNLH friends,

         

        The forwarded email message below is not about Lewis and Clark, but about our Founding Fathers.  I hope that you will find it worthwhile.

         

        Best wishes,

        John O.


        Subject: Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

         
         

         


        Subject: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

         

         Happy 4th

         

         
         Humbling Independence Day History Lesson:

         

         

         
         Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men
         who signed the Declaration of Independence?

         
         Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,
         and tortured before they died.

         
         Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
         Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army;
         another had two sons captured.

         
         Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or
         hardships of the Revolutionary War.

         
         They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
         and their sacred honor.

         
         What kind of men were they?

         
         Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
         Eleven were merchants,
         nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
         men of means, well educated,
         but they signed the Declaration of Independence
         knowing full well that the penalty would be death if
         they were captured.
         Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and
         trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the
         British Navy. He sold his home and properties to
         pay his debts, and died in rags.

         
         Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
         that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
         He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
         was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him,
         and poverty was his reward.

         
         Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
         Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

         
         At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that
         the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson
         home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
         George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed,
         and Nelson died bankrupt.

         
         Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
         The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

         
         John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
         Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill
         were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests
         and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his
         children vanished.
         So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
         silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.

         
         Remember: freedom is never free!

         
         I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many
         people as you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism
         is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games. 


         

         

         

         



      • deeandjohn87@comcast.net
        Layne is quite right, and I am a bit sheepish.   My national pride overwhelmed my fact-checking.  I recommend taking a look at the Snopes article on this
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 5, 2012
        • 0 Attachment

          Layne is quite right, and I am a bit sheepish.  My national pride overwhelmed my fact-checking.  I recommend taking a look at the Snopes article on this subject.  The explanations of the inaccuracies of the forwarded email, as well as the details about what actually occured, are as interesting as the email itself.  And it also gives credit to those whose names are not remembered, yet paid the ultimate price for liberty.

           

          http://www.snopes.com/history/american/pricepaid.asp

           

          I hope that you all enjoyed your Independence Day beneath the spacious skies, whether you spent in among the amber waves of grain, the purple mountains majesties, or the fruited plains.

           

          Best wishes,

          John O.


          From: clayne1@...
          To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, July 5, 2012 9:22:04 PM
          Subject: Re: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

           

          John,

          You should have ran that post through Snopes first.

          Layne

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: deeandjohn87@...
          To: PNLHmembers <PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Fri, 06 Jul 2012 04:03:40 -0000 (UTC)
          Subject: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson









           

          Dear PNLH friends,


          The forwarded email message below is not about Lewis and Clark, but about our Founding Fathers.  I hope that you will find it worthwhile.


          Best wishes,

          John O.


          Subject: Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

           
           

           


          Subject: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

           

           Happy 4th

           

           
           Humbling Independence Day History Lesson:

           

           

           
           Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men
           who signed the Declaration of Independence?

           
           Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,
           and tortured before they died.

           
           Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
           Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army;
           another had two sons captured.

           
           Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or
           hardships of the Revolutionary War.

           
           They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
           and their sacred honor.

           
           What kind of men were they?

           
           Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
           Eleven were merchants,
           nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
           men of means, well educated,
           but they signed the Declaration of Independence
           knowing full well that the penalty would be death if
           they were captured.
           Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and
           trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the
           British Navy. He sold his home and properties to
           pay his debts, and died in rags.

           
           Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
           that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
           He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
           was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him,
           and poverty was his reward.

           
           Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
           Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

           
           At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that
           the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson
           home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
           George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed,
           and Nelson died bankrupt.

           
           Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
           The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

           
           John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
           Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill
           were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests
           and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his
           children vanished.
           So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
           silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.

           
           Remember: freedom is never free!

           
           I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many
           people as you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism
           is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games. 


           

           

           

           







        • deeandjohn87@comcast.net
          Thanks, Sid.  Some of the facts within  proved to be inaccurate, but he sentiment was genuine. John O. ... From: Sidney Stoffels
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 5, 2012
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            Thanks, Sid.  Some of the facts within proved to be inaccurate, but he sentiment was genuine.

             

            John O.


            From: "Sidney Stoffels" <sidstoffels@...>
            To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, July 5, 2012 9:31:48 PM
            Subject: Re: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

             

            Sorry,
              My computer send unfinished draft. Thanks again John for reminding us to remember why we celebrate July 4th.
            Sid

            --- On Thu, 7/5/12, Sidney Stoffels <sidstoffels@...> wrote:

            From: Sidney Stoffels <sidstoffels@...>
            Subject: Re: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson
            To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, July 5, 2012, 9:27 PM

             

            John O,
              Thank you! It reminds of an old CSN song, "Find the cost of Freedom buried in the ground". I  reread the Declaration of Independence yesterday morning. and the phrase "life, liberty, and the PURSUIT of happiness". Pursuit is an action word

            --- On Thu, 7/5/12, deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...> wrote:

            From: deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...>
            Subject: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson
            To: "PNLHmembers" <PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Thursday, July 5, 2012, 9:03 PM

             

            Dear PNLH friends,

             

            The forwarded email message below is not about Lewis and Clark, but about our Founding Fathers.  I hope that you will find it worthwhile.

             

            Best wishes,

            John O.


            Subject: Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

             
             

             


            Subject: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

             

             Happy 4th

             

             
             Humbling Independence Day History Lesson:

             

             

             
             Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men
             who signed the Declaration of Independence?

             
             Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,
             and tortured before they died.

             
             Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
             Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army;
             another had two sons captured.

             
             Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or
             hardships of the Revolutionary War.

             
             They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
             and their sacred honor.

             
             What kind of men were they?

             
             Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
             Eleven were merchants,
             nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
             men of means, well educated,
             but they signed the Declaration of Independence
             knowing full well that the penalty would be death if
             they were captured.
             Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and
             trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the
             British Navy. He sold his home and properties to
             pay his debts, and died in rags.

             
             Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
             that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
             He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
             was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him,
             and poverty was his reward.

             
             Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
             Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

             
             At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that
             the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson
             home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
             George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed,
             and Nelson died bankrupt.

             
             Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
             The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

             
             John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
             Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill
             were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests
             and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his
             children vanished.
             So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
             silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.

             
             Remember: freedom is never free!

             
             I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many
             people as you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism
             is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games. 


             

             

             

             



          • Jim Phillips
            The existence of SNOPES is supposed to make all information totally factual and precise; but the fact that it gets thrown out constantly to let people know
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 6, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              The existence of SNOPES is supposed to make all information totally factual and precise; but the fact that it gets thrown out constantly to let people know that 'YOUR WRONG' just sort of grates on my rear-end. Who's to say that SNOPES is 'always accurate and 100% truthful' in the first place? Having it waved around as the final arbiter of fact just rubs me raw. I appreciate having errors pointed out, but get a bit upset by having SNOPES hanging over my head like 'the Sword of Damocles' every time I turn around.
               
              Just me, I guess: But I don't appreciate every one 'snoping around' all the time.
               
              Have a great day! Thanks for the 'info', John!!!
               

              "We Proceed On...."

               

              To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
              From: deeandjohn87@...
              Date: Fri, 6 Jul 2012 04:03:40 +0000
              Subject: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

               

              Dear PNLH friends,
               
              The forwarded email message below is not about Lewis and Clark, but about our Founding Fathers.  I hope that you will find it worthwhile.
               
              Best wishes,
              John O.




              Subject: Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson


               
               

               


              Subject: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

               

               Happy 4th

               

               
               Humbling Independence Day History Lesson:

               

               

               
               Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men
               who signed the Declaration of Independence?

               
               Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,
               and tortured before they died.

               
               Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
               Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army;
               another had two sons captured.

               
               Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or
               hardships of the Revolutionary War.

               
               They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
               and their sacred honor.

               
               What kind of men were they?

               
               Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
               Eleven were merchants,
               nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
               men of means, well educated,
               but they signed the Declaration of Independence
               knowing full well that the penalty would be death if
               they were captured.
               Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and
               trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the
               British Navy. He sold his home and properties to
               pay his debts, and died in rags.

               
               Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
               that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
               He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
               was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him,
               and poverty was his reward.

               
               Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
               Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

               
               At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that
               the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson
               home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
               George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed,
               and Nelson died bankrupt.

               
               Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
               The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

               
               John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
               Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill
               were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests
               and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his
               children vanished.
               So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
               silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.

               
               Remember: freedom is never free!

               
               I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many
               people as you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism
               is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games. 


               

               

               

               




            • deeandjohn87@comcast.net
              Jim, You make a very good point.  I don t know how Snopes checks facts, and I have given them the benefit of the doubt in that regard.  If anyone else knows
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 6, 2012
              • 0 Attachment

                Jim,

                 

                You make a very good point.  I don't know how Snopes checks facts, and I have given them the benefit of the doubt in that regard.  If anyone else knows of another reliable source for fact checking (since the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, circa 1968, remains at my parents' house), please share.  I would like to have a good online source for cross-checking Snopes.

                 

                I do like to find some kind of confirmation before I send things on, since I receive so many messages for which the well-meaning senders did not do it.

                 

                Huzzah for you all, and tally-ho!  [Or, Talleyrand?]

                 

                John O.


                From: "Jim Phillips" <drouillard1805@...>
                To: "PNLH Group" <pnlhmembers@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, July 6, 2012 12:29:16 PM
                Subject: RE: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

                 

                The existence of SNOPES is supposed to make all information totally factual and precise; but the fact that it gets thrown out constantly to let people know that 'YOUR WRONG' just sort of grates on my rear-end. Who's to say that SNOPES is 'always accurate and 100% truthful' in the first place? Having it waved around as the final arbiter of fact just rubs me raw. I appreciate having errors pointed out, but get a bit upset by having SNOPES hanging over my head like 'the Sword of Damocles' every time I turn around.
                 
                Just me, I guess: But I don't appreciate every one 'snoping around' all the time.
                 
                Have a great day! Thanks for the 'info', John!!!
                 

                "We Proceed On...."

                 

                To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
                From: deeandjohn87@...
                Date: Fri, 6 Jul 2012 04:03:40 +0000
                Subject: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

                 

                Dear PNLH friends,
                 
                The forwarded email message below is not about Lewis and Clark, but about our Founding Fathers.  I hope that you will find it worthwhile.
                 
                Best wishes,
                John O.




                Subject: Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson


                 
                 

                 


                Subject: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

                 

                 Happy 4th

                 

                 
                 Humbling Independence Day History Lesson:

                 

                 

                 
                 Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men
                 who signed the Declaration of Independence?

                 
                 Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,
                 and tortured before they died.

                 
                 Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
                 Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army;
                 another had two sons captured.

                 
                 Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or
                 hardships of the Revolutionary War.

                 
                 They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
                 and their sacred honor.

                 
                 What kind of men were they?

                 
                 Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
                 Eleven were merchants,
                 nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
                 men of means, well educated,
                 but they signed the Declaration of Independence
                 knowing full well that the penalty would be death if
                 they were captured.
                 Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and
                 trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the
                 British Navy. He sold his home and properties to
                 pay his debts, and died in rags.

                 
                 Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
                 that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
                 He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
                 was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him,
                 and poverty was his reward.

                 
                 Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
                 Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

                 
                 At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that
                 the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson
                 home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
                 George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed,
                 and Nelson died bankrupt.

                 
                 Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
                 The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

                 
                 John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
                 Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill
                 were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests
                 and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his
                 children vanished.
                 So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
                 silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.

                 
                 Remember: freedom is never free!

                 
                 I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many
                 people as you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism
                 is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games. 


                 

                 

                 

                 




              • Michael Harbour
                Snopes is run by a husband and wife who enjoy research and fact-checking. They ve been researching rumors, claims, chain emails and for their site since 1995.
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 7, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  Snopes is run by a husband and wife who enjoy research and fact-checking. They've been researching rumors, claims, chain emails and for their site since 1995.

                  The other generally respected fact checking site is factcheck.org which focuses more on political fact checking.

                  Snopes.com is usually my first stop since they cover a broader area and whenever I have the time and inclination to fact check their fact checking, they've been dead on. Plus they're up front when they can't find sufficient information. They've certainly discredited some things I wish were true but I'm not so wedded to being right that I'll sacrifice being accurate.

                  Reader's Digest  had a story about them a few years ago:
                  http://www.rd.com/home/rumor-detectives-true-story-or-online-hoax/

                  And if FactCheck is more your cup of tea, in 2009 they received a request to fact check a widely circulated email rumor about Snopes:
                  http://www.factcheck.org/2009/04/snopescom/

                  Near the end of FactCheck's article they say:

                  "The e-mail’s last paragraph advises that everyone who goes to Snopes.com for "the bottom line facts" should "proceed with caution." We think that’s terrific advice, not just in connection with material on Snopes but for practically anything a reader finds online — including articles on FactCheck.org. The very reason we list our sources (as does Snopes.com) and provide links is so that readers can check things out for themselves."

                  which is great advice.

                  After fact checking a source enough times, I begin to have confidence in them.

                  Actually, (story time) I trained Liberty to be skeptical and think critically by sometimes answering questions with something I simply made up but which sounded reasonable (something I think we all do occasionally in living history programs; we can't know everything,so we sometimes go with educated guesses.) She learned very young to evaluate what she was told before accepting it; you could almost see the wheels turning as she looked at me for clues in my body language and thought "Is this for real, or is this B.S." - as a result she doesn't often succumb to credulousness.

                  We Proceed On ... I hope with open eyes and clear intention

                  Michael Harbour  
                  FreeRice.com Test your knowledge, Feed the hungry.



                  --- On Fri, 7/6/12, deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...> wrote:

                  From: deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...>
                  Subject: Re: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson
                  To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, July 6, 2012, 9:30 PM

                   

                  Jim,

                   

                  You make a very good point.  I don't know how Snopes checks facts, and I have given them the benefit of the doubt in that regard.  If anyone else knows of another reliable source for fact checking (since the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, circa 1968, remains at my parents' house), please share.  I would like to have a good online source for cross-checking Snopes.

                   

                  I do like to find some kind of confirmation before I send things on, since I receive so many messages for which the well-meaning senders did not do it.

                   

                  Huzzah for you all, and tally-ho!  [Or, Talleyrand?]

                   

                  John O.


                  From: "Jim Phillips" <drouillard1805@...>
                  To: "PNLH Group" <pnlhmembers@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Friday, July 6, 2012 12:29:16 PM
                  Subject: RE: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

                   

                  The existence of SNOPES is supposed to make all information totally factual and precise; but the fact that it gets thrown out constantly to let people know that 'YOUR WRONG' just sort of grates on my rear-end. Who's to say that SNOPES is 'always accurate and 100% truthful' in the first place? Having it waved around as the final arbiter of fact just rubs me raw. I appreciate having errors pointed out, but get a bit upset by having SNOPES hanging over my head like 'the Sword of Damocles' every time I turn around.
                   
                  Just me, I guess: But I don't appreciate every one 'snoping around' all the time.
                   
                  Have a great day! Thanks for the 'info', John!!!
                   

                  "We Proceed On...."

                   

                  To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
                  From: deeandjohn87@...
                  Date: Fri, 6 Jul 2012 04:03:40 +0000
                  Subject: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

                   

                  Dear PNLH friends,
                   
                  The forwarded email message below is not about Lewis and Clark, but about our Founding Fathers.  I hope that you will find it worthwhile.
                   
                  Best wishes,
                  John O.




                  Subject: Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson


                   
                   

                   


                  Subject: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

                   

                   Happy 4th

                   

                   
                   Humbling Independence Day History Lesson:

                   

                   

                   
                   Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men
                   who signed the Declaration of Independence?

                   
                   Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,
                   and tortured before they died.

                   
                   Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
                   Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army;
                   another had two sons captured.

                   
                   Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or
                   hardships of the Revolutionary War.

                   
                   They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
                   and their sacred honor.

                   
                   What kind of men were they?

                   
                   Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
                   Eleven were merchants,
                   nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
                   men of means, well educated,
                   but they signed the Declaration of Independence
                   knowing full well that the penalty would be death if
                   they were captured.
                   Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and
                   trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the
                   British Navy. He sold his home and properties to
                   pay his debts, and died in rags.

                   
                   Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
                   that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
                   He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
                   was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him,
                   and poverty was his reward.

                   
                   Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
                   Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

                   
                   At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that
                   the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson
                   home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
                   George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed,
                   and Nelson died bankrupt.

                   
                   Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
                   The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

                   
                   John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
                   Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill
                   were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests
                   and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his
                   children vanished.
                   So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
                   silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.

                   
                   Remember: freedom is never free!

                   
                   I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many
                   people as you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism
                   is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games. 


                   

                   

                   

                   




                • drouillard1805@hotmail.com
                  Thanks Michael. Appreciate the great response!Sent with Verizon Mobile Email---Original Message--- From:
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 7, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks Michael. Appreciate the great response!

                    < -- The message is truncated. -- >


                    Sent with Verizon Mobile Email


                    ---Original Message---
                    From: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: 7/7/2012 1:05 am
                    To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson

                    Snopes is run by a husband and wife who enjoy research and fact-checking. They've been researching rumors, claims, chain emails and for their site since 1995. The other generally respected fact checking site is factcheck.org which focuses more on political fact checking. Snopes.com is usually my first stop since they cover a broader area and whenever I have the time and inclination to fact check their fact checking, they've been dead on. Plus they're up front when they can't find sufficient information. They've certainly discredited some things I wish were true but I'm not so wedded to being right that I'll sacrifice being accurate. Reader's Digest  had a story about them a few years ago: http://www.rd.com/home/rumor-detectives-true-story-or-online-hoax/ And if FactCheck is more your cup of tea, in 2009 they received a request to fact check a widely circulated email rumor about Snopes: http://www.factcheck.org/2009/04/snopescom/ Near the end of FactCheck's article they say: "The e-mail’s last paragraph advises that everyone who goes to Snopes.com for "the bottom line facts" should "proceed with caution." We think that’s terrific advice, not just in connection with material on Snopes but for practically anything a reader finds online — including articles on FactCheck.org. The very reason we list our sources (as does Snopes.com) and provide links is so that readers can check things out for themselves." which is great advice. After fact checking a source enough times, I begin to have confidence in them. Actually, (story time) I trained Liberty to be skeptical and think critically by sometimes answering questions with something I simply made up but which sounded reasonable (something I think we all do occasionally in living history programs; we can't know everything,so we sometimes go with educated guesses.) She learned very young to evaluate what she was told before accepting it; you could almost see the wheels turning as she looked at me for clues in my body language and thought "Is this for real, or is this B.S." - as a result she doesn't often succumb to credulousness. We Proceed On ... I hope with open eyes and clear intention Michael Harbour   Cafe Press Store FreeRice.com Test your knowledge, Feed the hungry. --- On Fri, 7/6/12, deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...> wrote: From: deeandjohn87@... <deeandjohn87@...> Subject: Re: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com Date: Friday, July 6, 2012, 9:30 PM   Jim,   You make a very good point.  I don't know how Snopes checks facts, and I have given them the benefit of the doubt in that regard.  If anyone else knows of another reliable source for fact checking (since the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, circa 1968, remains at my parents' house), please share.  I would like to have a good online source for cross-checking Snopes.   I do like to find some kind of confirmation before I send things on, since I receive so many messages for which the well-meaning senders did not do it.   Huzzah for you all, and tally-ho!  [Or, Talleyrand?]   John O. From: "Jim Phillips" <drouillard1805@...> To: "PNLH Group" <pnlhmembers@yahoogroups.com> Sent: Friday, July 6, 2012 12:29:16 PM Subject: RE: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson   The existence of SNOPES is supposed to make all information totally factual and precise; but the fact that it gets thrown out constantly to let people know that 'YOUR WRONG' just sort of grates on my rear-end. Who's to say that SNOPES is 'always accurate and 100% truthful' in the first place? Having it waved around as the final arbiter of fact just rubs me raw. I appreciate having errors pointed out, but get a bit upset by having SNOPES hanging over my head like 'the Sword of Damocles' every time I turn around.   Just me, I guess: But I don't appreciate every one 'snoping around' all the time.   Have a great day! Thanks for the 'info', John!!!   "We Proceed On...."   To: PNLHmembers@yahoogroups.com From: deeandjohn87@... Date: Fri, 6 Jul 2012 04:03:40 +0000 Subject: [PNLHmembers] Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson   Dear PNLH friends,   The forwarded email message below is not about Lewis and Clark, but about our Founding Fathers.  I hope that you will find it worthwhile.   Best wishes, John O. Subject: Fwd: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson       Subject: Humbling Independence Day History Lesson    Happy 4th      Humbling Independence Day History Lesson:        Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men  who signed the Declaration of Independence?    Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,  and tortured before they died.    Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.  Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary
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