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Chinese container ship Cosco Busan spills 58,000 gallons of bunker oil fuel after striking San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in heavy fog 7 November

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  • Phelps Hobart
    The Chinese container ship Cosco Busan spilt 58,000 gallons of bunker oil fuel after striking San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in heavy fog 7 November. Regal
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 18, 2007
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      The Chinese container ship Cosco Busan spilt 58,000 gallons of bunker oil fuel after striking San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in heavy fog 7 November. Regal Stone Ltd. is the company that owns the vessel.

      Sens. Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein — who say more than half of the sulfur air pollution in Southern California comes from ships exhaust — have introduced legislation to remove sulfur from the fuel. And in the wake of the Cosco Busan oil spill, environmentalists have called for a worldwide ban on bunker fuel.

      The International Maritime Organization saw the Cosco Busan oil spill coming: Last year, it banned new ships from being built with their fuel tanks along the hull beginning in 2010. In effect, the U.N. agency determined that increasingly large, fast ships that carry as much fuel as a small oil tanker should not carry that fuel along the side of the vessel, directly behind a single-layer hull.

      Built in 2001, the Cosco Busan is among the growing number of bigger, faster container ships that have "winged tanks" - fuel tanks arrayed along the sides of the ship. The International Maritime Organization convention, adopted in March 2006, requires that by 2010 all new ships traveling internationally with an oil fuel capacity of 600 cubic meters or more must have their fuel tanks deeper inside the ship and behind two walls. That rule affects most large commercial ships, and would have affected the Cosco Busan.

       
      Check out the links below to learn more about this incident and the response.
       
      Phelps
       
      ________________________________________
       
       
      Busan Unified Command WebsiteNational Marine SanctuariesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationCA Fish and GameU.S. Coast GuardNational Park Service


      Operational
      Overview
      Map
      (Nov. 18, 2007)

      3mb PDF

      Operational Overview Map 3mb PDF

      071117-G-5732-096.jpg

      SAN FRANCISCO - A worker cleans oil off of the bottom of a ship's hull at PIER 96 in San Francisco, Nov. 17, 2007.

      Boats and equipment were used to collect oil spilled from the Cosco Busan.

      The Cosco Busan allided with the Bay Bridge between San Francisco and Oakland Nov. 7 spilling approximately 58,000 gallons of oil.

      U.S. Coast Guard Photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Angelia M. Rorison


      SAN FRANCISCO - Workers clean oil off oil spill response equipment at PIER 96 in San Francisco, Nov. 17, 2007.

      U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 2nd Class Andrew Kendrick

      Cosco Busan DECON (FOR RELEASE)

      Cosco Busan oil Spill Response

      SAN FRANCISCO - (Nov. 16, 2007) Tom Rusert, a volunteer with the International Bird Rescue Association, releases a rehabilitated shorebird today at Half Moon Bay, Calif.

      Cosco Busan Incident Unified Command members, gave a press conference before the release of 28 rehabilitated birds that had been affected by the November 7 oil spill in San Francisco Bay.

      U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Mariana O'Leary

      CURRENT INFORMATION:


      • NOAA Office of Response and Restoration click here

      • Slideshow of Oil Spill Response Images click here

      • Map of Operations (requires Acrobat Reader) Nov 15 click here


      • To report oiled wildlife, please call 415-701-2311

      • To file a claim for oiled property, please call 866-442-9650

      • For a list of non-oiled beaches requiring clean up, click here

      Images can be found on the Coast Guard's Imagery Web Site by clicking here

       

      Tides may worsen San Francisco oil spill

      By MARCUS WOHLSEN, Associated Press Writer 5 minutes ago

      Tides predicted to peak shortly after Thanksgiving could wash sticky, thick balls of oil off beaches and spread them to places previously unaffected after a cargo ship hit a bridge this month, spilling 58,000 gallons of fuel.

      Most of the oil floating on the water has already washed up on beaches or was recovered by cleanup teams by early last week, according to an environmental study of the spill, federal and state officials said Sunday.

      More than 16,000 gallons of oil had been collected, and another 4,000 gallons had evaporated by Sunday, according to a statement issued by the Coast Guard and wildlife officials.

      The agencies' environmental report said that tar balls could persist in the San Francisco Bay through the end of the month. As sand begins sticking to the globules of oil, they may begin to sink, the report said.

      The freighter Cosco Busan struck the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in heavy fog on Nov. 7. Federal prosecutors are doing a criminal investigation of the spill. Officials are focusing on the actions of the ship's pilot and crew.

      The lasting effects of the spill on Bay Area ecosystems was underscored Sunday when a dead bird covered in oil was recovered on a beach south of San Francisco that had been cleaned and reopened on Friday.

      The number of oiled birds found dead or that died after being taken to rescue centers has neared 1,400, while the total number of birds blackened by the spill topped 2,000.

      About 18 beaches and piers remained closed over the weekend while cleanup crews worked to recover more oil before the onset of higher tides.

      The agencies' analysis said there was a "slight chance" that some oil could reach as far as Ano Nuevo, a pristine wilderness coastline more than 40 miles south that hosts the world's largest mainland breeding colony for the northern elephant seal.

      "A few scattered tar balls" could also end up near the Farallon Islands, a wildlife refuge about 26 miles off the coast, if strong winds over the next week push the oil out to sea, the report said.

      ___

      On the Net:

      Oil spill response: http://www.coscobusanincident.com

      News Stories for Cosco Busan

      (Results 1 - 10 of about 1,572)
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      • 1.
        The Daily Comet - Nov 16 5:30 PM
        The following exchange took place between the pilot of the Cosco Busan and the Coast Guard's Vessel Traffic Service in the moments before and after the Cosco Busan sideswiped the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in heavy fog the morning of Nov. 7. This is according to an official familiar with the investigation who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation.
      • 2.
        NBC 11 Bay Area - Nov 16 10:18 AM
        Coast Guard officials say they stopped their warnings to the pilot of the Cosco Busan that he might hit the Bay Bridge, when he told them he knew where he was going.
      • 3.
        NBC 11 Bay Area - Nov 16 10:16 AM
        SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- Investigators said Thursday the Coast Guard warned the pilot of the Cosco Busan he was on course to hit the Bay Bridge but they kept quiet when the pilot told them he knew where he was going, NBC11's Bob Redell reported.
      • 4.
        KRXI-TV Reno - Nov 14 7:35 AM
        While the pilot at the helm when the Cosco Busan has pointed the finger at the ship's captain, federal officials Wednesday released tentative information from their investigation showing that the pilot reported the ship's radar was out just before it hit Oakland-San Francisco Bay Bridge, dumping 58,000 gallons of bunker fuel oil into the Bay waters.
      • 5.
        Business Wire via Yahoo! Finance - Nov 14 3:57 PM
        SAN FRANCISCO----The Cosco Busan Oil Spill in San Francisco has not impacted Tomales Bay. Oysters and shellfish of Tomales Bay are healthy, clean and available for the holidays.
      • 6.
        The Fresno Bee - Nov 16 5:45 PM
        ---
      • 7.
        NBC 11 Bay Area - Nov 13 11:18 AM
        A temporary repair plan for the Cosco Busan may be approved as early as today, allowing the tanker ship to relocate from the middle of the San Francisco Bay to a local shipyard, according to a spokesman for the Regal Stone Ltd., the company that owns the vessel.
      • 8.
        Contra Costa Times - Nov 18 3:25 AM
        ONLINE www.coscobusanincident.com. inside Volunteers are showing up in droves to help with the cleanup. Page 27 IF you go A House Transportation and Infrastructure subcommittee will hold a field hearing on the Cosco Busan spill's causes and response at 10 a.
      • 9.
        Moldova.org - Nov 18 7:04 AM
        Federal and state officials are trying to devise a plan for the safe cleaning of 11,000 boats fouled by the massive oil spill in San Francisco Bay. They hope to avoid a situation in which oil from boats ends up back in the bay, The Oakland Tribune reported. About 58,000 gallons of bunker fuel, a heavy low-grade oil, was dumped Nov. 7 when a Chinese container ship, the Cosco Busan, hit a tower on ...
      • 10.
        Vallejo Times-Herald - Nov 16 12:42 AM
        SAN FRANCISCO - Chinese crew members of the cargo ship that caused the San Francisco Bay oil spill are refusing to speak with federal investigators and apparently had their drug and alcohol tests mishandled in the incident's aftermath, authorities said Wednesday.
      • 11.
        Half Moon Bay Review - Nov 17 7:07 PM
        Coastside officials say no oil from last week's Cosco Busan spill has been confirmed south of Pacifica, where a popular beach has been closed.
      • 12.
        San Jose Mercury News - Nov 17 1:53 AM
        The International Maritime Organization saw the Cosco Busan oil spill coming: Last year, it banned new ships from being built with their fuel tanks along the hull beginning in 2010.
      • 13.
        Oakland Tribune - Nov 17 2:53 AM
        The low-grade, tarry fuel that spilled into San Francisco Bay from the Cosco Busan last week is attracting scrutiny from regulators, lawmakers and environmentalists because of how badly it can foul
      • 14.
        The Daily Review - Nov 17 3:08 AM
        The low-grade, tarry fuel that spilled into San Francisco Bay from the Cosco Busan last week is attracting scrutiny from regulators, lawmakers and environmentalists.
      • 15.
        San Mateo Daily Journal - Nov 16 10:37 PM
        Eleven days after the Cosco Busan container ship spilled 58,000 gallons of crude oil into the San Francisco Bay, officials announced the reopening of local beaches and released approximately 50 saved birds at Pillar Point, just north of Half Moon Bay.
      • 16.
        Marin Independent Journal - Nov 16 11:51 PM
        A week and a half after the container ship Cosco Busan hemorrhaged 58,000 gallons of bunker fuel oil into San Francisco Bay, Marin County officials announced Friday
      • 17.
        KTVU 2 San Francisco - Nov 16 7:17 PM
        BAY AREA -- The first round of collected and cleaned birds from the Nov. 7 Cosco Busan oil spill in San Francisco Bay was released into the wild Friday, said cleanup officials.
      • 18.
        Marin Independent Journal - Nov 16 4:36 PM
        A week and a half after the container ship Cosco Busan hemorrhaged 58,000 gallons of bunker fuel oil into San Francisco Bay, Marin County officials announced
      • 19.
        Marin Independent Journal - Nov 16 11:51 PM
        A SECTION of Richardson Bay off Tiburon may provide a unique opportunity in coming months to determine just how much the Cosco Busan oil spill damaged the
      • 20.
        EARTHtimes.org - Nov 16 9:40 PM
        Federal investigators have found no problems with navigation systems on a Chinese container ship that hit a bridge in San Francisco Bay. The collision last week ripped a gash in the side of the Cosco Busan, sending 58,000 gallons of fuel oil into the bay....
    • usaseapower
      MarineLog February 19, 2010 Fleet Management to pay $10 million in Cosco Busan case http://www.marinelog.com/DOCS/NEWSMMIX/2010feb00193.html
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 24, 2010
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        MarineLog

        February 19, 2010

        Fleet Management to pay $10 million in Cosco Busan case

        Fleet Management Ltd. was ordered to pay $10 million today for its role in causing the Cosco Busan oil discharge and a subsequent cover-up after the ship struck the San Francisco Bay Bridge in November 2007, the Justice Department announced.

        Judge Susan Illston of the U.S. District Court in San Francisco, pursuant to the plea agreement, ordered $2 million of the total $10 million monetary assessment to be devoted to fund marine environmental projects in San Francisco Bay.

        Fleet Management, a Hong Kong-based ship management firm, pleaded guilty to a criminal violation of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 as well as felony obstruction of justice and false statement charges for creating false and forged documents after the crash at the direction of shore-based supervisors with an intent to deceive the U.S. Coast Guard.

        Fleet Management was also ordered to implement a comprehensive compliance plan that would include heightened training and voyage planning for ships engaged in trade in the United States. The training will focus on better preparing masters for command of Fleet's vessels, providing classroom and shipboard navigation training to those who navigate Fleet's vessels, and ensuring that all Fleet vessels calling in U.S. ports create a thorough plan for how they will navigate in those ports. The new training and voyage planning requirements will be subject to auditing and the court's supervision.

        "Fleet's systemic management failures played a significant role in causing the Cosco Busan disaster and they compounded the problem by attempting to cover-up their conduct," said Ignacia S. Moreno, Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division. "The sentence today not only includes a significant monetary penalty but also will ensure that Fleet Management develops a culture that puts safety and the environment first."

        "Fleet failed to meet its obligation under international law to ensure the crew was adequately trained on navigation procedures and equipment and then tried to cover it up," said U.S. Attorney Russoniello. "Today's sentencing should serve as a warning to everyone in the maritime industry - you will be held accountable for violations of federal and international laws."

        "The U.S. Coast Guard is pleased to see an increased emphasis on crew training," said Rear Admiral Joseph Castillo, Commander of the 11th Coast Guard District. "The safety of mariners, the health of our economy, and the protection of our environment all require the safest possible operation of merchant ships sailing in our ports, waterways and coastal areas, and proper training is key to safe operations."

        "Shipping companies that move goods through the San Francisco Bay must operate their vessels in a safe and legal manner. The Cosco Busan oil spill should not have occurred in the first place, and the company's attempt to cover-up its illegal acts only compounded the initial crime," said Nick Torres, Special Agent in Charge of EPA's Criminal Investigation Division in San Francisco. "The laws are there to protect our precious natural resources. Today's sentence sends a clear message that those who violate the law and pollute our waters will be vigorously prosecuted."

        Fleet Management admitted "that it was a cause of a discharge of a harmful quantity of oil into the navigable waters of the United States, that it acted negligently, and that its negligence was a proximate cause of the discharge of oil into San Francisco Bay on Nov. 7, 2007."

        In pleading guilty on Aug. 13, 2009, Fleet admitted that after the ship hit the Bay Bridge, it concealed ship records and created materially false, fictitious and forged documents with an intent to influence the Coast Guard's investigation. In particular, a false berth-to-berth passage plan for the day of the crash was created after the incident at the direction of shore-side supervisors known as superintendents and with the knowledge of the ship's master. Additionally, a ship officer falsified the ship's official navigational chart to show fixes that were not actually recorded during the voyage. Other records including false passage planning checklists were also created after the fact.

        The collision caused a gash measuring approximately 150 feet long by 12 feet high on the port side of the ship, puncturing two of the ship's fuel tanks and damaging the fendering system on the Delta tower of the bridge, and resulting in a significant environmental clean-up. At least 2,000 migratory birds died, including Brown Pelicans, Marbled Murrelets and Western Grebes. The Brown Pelican is a federally endangered species and the Marbled Murrelet is a federally threatened species and an endangered species under California law.

        The pilot of the Cosco Busan, Captain John Cota, pleaded guilty on March 6, 2009, and was later sentenced to 10 months in prison, one year of supervised release and 200 hours of community service for his role in causing the Cosco Busan collision and discharge of oil and deaths of migratory birds.

        The criminal investigation was conducted by the Coast Guard Investigative Service; the EPA Criminal Investigation Division; the Federal Bureau of Investigation; the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Silicon Valley Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory; and the California Department of Fish and Game, Office of Spill Prevention and Response. The investigation also received technical assistance from other Coast Guard offices including District 11 Legal Office, Sector San Francisco, Office of Investigations and Analysis, Office of Maritime and International Law, Office of Vessel Activities, Electronics Support Unit, Alameda and the Marine Safety Laboratory. In announcing the sentencing, the U.S. Attorney and Assistant Attorney General thanked federal and state investigators and offices for their assistance in the prosecution.

        The criminal case was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of California and the Justice Department's Environmental Crimes Section.


        _______________________________

        --- In PMMC-NLUS@yahoogroups.com, "Phelps Hobart" <nlsac@...> wrote:

        The Chinese container ship Cosco Busan spilt 58,000 gallons of bunker oil fuel after striking San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in heavy fog 7 November. Regal Stone Ltd. is the company that owns the vessel.
        Sens. Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein - who say more than half of the sulfur air pollution in Southern California comes from ships exhaust - have introduced legislation to remove sulfur from the fuel. And in the wake of the Cosco Busan oil spill, environmentalists have called for a worldwide ban on bunker fuel.
        The International Maritime Organization saw the Cosco Busan oil spill coming: Last year, it banned new ships from being built with their fuel tanks along the hull beginning in 2010. In effect, the U.N. agency determined that increasingly large, fast ships that carry as much fuel as a small oil tanker should not carry that fuel along the side of the vessel, directly behind a single-layer hull.
        Built in 2001, the Cosco Busan is among the growing number of bigger, faster container ships that have "winged tanks" - fuel tanks arrayed along the sides of the ship. The International Maritime Organization convention, adopted in March 2006, requires that by 2010 all new ships traveling internationally with an oil fuel capacity of 600 cubic meters or more must have their fuel tanks deeper inside the ship and behind two walls. That rule affects most large commercial ships, and would have affected the Cosco Busan.

        Phelps

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