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Coast Guard Cutter Waesche (WMSL 751) Arrived at Coast Guard Island February 28

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  • Phelps Hobart
    Thank you to all who came out to greet her Sunday. Sounds like everyone dockside was really excited. I suspect the officers and crew were equally enthused.
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 3, 2010
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      Thank you to all who came out to greet her Sunday. Sounds like everyone dockside was really excited. I suspect the officers and crew were equally enthused. Crossing the Bay, I understand the port's fire boats gave her a salute with streams of water.

      If you have yet to contribute in support of the commissioning activities May 7th, there is still time to do so online. Details are at the bottom of this message.

      Phelps
      Phelps Hobart
      Web Yeoman, PCR
      ____________________________________________

      http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/local/east_bay&id=7303454&rss=rss-kgo-article-7303454

      New Coast Guard cutter vessel arrives in Alameda  

      ALAMEDA, CA (KGO) -- The newest addition to the Coast Guard's fleet arrived at its new home in Alameda Sunday.

      Officials say the Coast Guard Cutter Waesche is one of the most technologically advanced vessels of its kind. The 418-foot ship has cutting-edge sensors, the ability to move at high speeds, a range of 12,000 miles and a crew of 110.

      It is the second of eight similar cutters the Coast Guard is planning to build.

       

      USCG News Release February 26, 2010

      http://www.uscgsanfrancisco.com/go/doc/823/488323

      Contact: PACS Keith Alholm

      (510) 388-1313

      Coast Guard's newest National Security Cutter to arrive at Alameda, Calif.

      Contact: PACS Keith Alholm - (510) 388-1313

      ALAMEDA, Calif. –The Coast Guard’s newest cutter is scheduled to arrive at its new homeport of Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Feb. 28 at 1 p.m.

      The Coast Guard Cutter Waesche, named for Adm. Russell R. Waesche, is the second of eight planned Legend Class cutters preceding the Coast Guard Cutter Dorothy Stratton and following the Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf.

      “We are proud to bring the Coast Guard’s newest and most technologically advanced ship to its home in Alameda,” said Coast Guard Capt. Lance Bardo, commanding officer of Waesche.

      The 418-foot cutter has a top speed of 28 knots, a range of 12,000 miles and a crew of 110. It's equipped with a 4,000 square-foot flight deck that is outfitted with an automated landing and dual track hangaring system. 

      Waesche is also equipped with two Short Range Prosecutor small boats that can be deployed and recovered from the stern launch system, increasing the ability to launch and recover boats in heavy seas.

      The ship will be commissioned at a ceremony on Coast Guard Island in May.

      “I look forward to the future accomplishments of this ship and crew as it contributes to the safety of America’s coasts,” said Bardo.

      Adm. Russell R. Waesche was the Coast Guard’s longest serving Commandant who presided over the greatest expansion of the service in history. Waesche ensured the integration of the U.S. Lighthouse Service into the Coast Guard and is also credited with the organization of the Coast Guard Reserve. He graduated from the Revenue Cutter School of Instruction and was commissioned as an Ensign in 1906.   Waesche retired from active duty Coast Guard service and passed away shortly thereafter in 1946.  He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

      Media interested in attending the arrival must RSVP to Pacific Area Public Affairs at 510-437-3318 or via duty cell phone 510-816-0215. Photo I.D., and proof of insurance are required to drive on base.

       
      SAN DIEGO – History was made when two of the Coast Guard’s Legend-class National Security Cutters; Bertholf and Waesche were documented during their transit together on the waters off the coast of Southern California, Friday, Feb. 26, 2010. Crewmembers from each of the cutters gathered on the flight deck in formation of the cutters' perspective hull numbers. (Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jetta H. Disco)

      The National Security Cutter (NSC)is the flagship of the fleet, capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs. It is the largest and most technically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement and national defense missions.

      NSC: Project Description

      Any Mission, Anytime, Anywhere

      At 418 feet, the lead ship in the new Legend-class of national security cutters is designed to be the flagship of the U.S. Coast Guard’s fleet, capable of executing the most challenging maritime security missions including supporting the mission requirements of the joint U.S. combatant commanders. The NSC is the largest and most technically advanced class of the Integrated Deepwater System (IDS) program’s three major classes of cutters and will replace the aging 378' High Endurance Hamilton class cutters that have been in service since the 1960s.

      USCG Bertholf and Waesche side-by-side
      Sister ships stand side-by-side as Bertholf undergoes testing and preparation for sea trials later this year. (Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman Ship Systems)

      Capability

      Compared to legacy cutters, the NSC’s design will provide better sea keeping and higher sustained transit speeds, greater endurance and range, and the ability for launch and recovery, in higher sea states of improved small boats, helicopters, and unmanned aerial vehicles – all key attributes in enabling the Coast Guard to implement increased security responsibilities. Such duties include exerting more effective jurisdiction over foreign-flagged ships transiting U.S. waters. Deepwater’s more capable maritime security cutters, for example, will enable the Coast Guard to screen and target vessels faster, more safely and reliably before they arrive in U.S. waters – to include conducting onboard verification through boardings and, if necessary, taking enforcement-control actions.The NSC will serve as an integral part of the Coast Guard’s collaborative inter-agency effort to achieve maritime domain awareness and ensure the safety of the American public and sovereignty of U.S. maritime borders.

      Evolving Mission Requirements

      Just as the multiple maritime and military roles of the U.S. Coast Guard have grown in scope and significance since the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States, so too have the NSC’s capability requirements evolved to be responsive to today’s ever-more challenging operational missions and threats. “ The Coast Guard’s Deepwater Program existed prior to 9/11”, said Blore at the keel-laying ceremony for “Waesche”, “as did our Coast Guard, as did this shipyard. For Deepwater to modernize and recapitalize the Coast Guard, we need to change with the threat.”

      NSC Structural Design

      Not atypically for a first-in-class ship, during the Coast Guard’s review of the NSC’s design from 2002 to 2004, concerns were raised about certain aspects of the ship’s structure that could prevent it from achieving its required 30-year service life. Specifically, Coast Guard and independent technical experts questioned whether some of the cutter’s structural components would experience fatigue damage prior to the service-life objective, a critical consideration given the extended, high-tempo operations expected of the NSC. After thorough review, the Coast Guard determined that it is in the U.S. Government’s interest to increase the fatigue tolerance of the NSC to ensure that the ship’s basic structures will meet its projected 30-year service life. Engineering changes to address the desired structural enhancements were developed in collaboration with the U.S. Navy and other naval engineering experts for approval by the Deepwater Program’s technical authority, the Engineering and Logistics Directorate at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

      In the end, Coast Guard officials say, the NSC will be designed to achieve a 30-year fatigue life and built to deliver 21st Century capabilities to the Coast Guard in a way that will enhance the safety of its crew and allow the Coast Guard to execute its central missions more effectively, efficiently, and safely.

      Status

      The U.S. Coast Guard conducted preliminary acceptance of Waesche (WMSL 751)on Nov. 6, 2009. Stratton is 35% complete.


      USCGC WAESCHE (WMSL 751) COMMISSIONING AND RECEPTION
       
      Note: There will also be a change of command and retirement at Coast Guard Island, VADM. Jody Breckenridge transfers command of USCG Pacific Area to RADM. Manson Brown. Then she retires. Date and time to be announced.

      Title                USCGC WAESCHE (WMSL 751) COMMISSIONING AND RECEPTION 

      Location         Coast Guard Island, Alameda, CA 

      Start Time      5/07/2010 10:00 AM

      End Time       5/07/2010 1:30 PM

      Description

      USCGC WAESCHE (WMSL 751) is the second ship in a new class of National Security Cutters (NSC). She is a state-of-the-art 418-foot vessel designed to meet the challenges that the Coast Guard will face for years to come. The Navy League of the United States, WAESCHE Commissioning Committee is coordinating the ceremony of this new ship. The NSC is the largest and most technically advanced class of the Integrated Deepwater System (IDS) program’s three major classes of cutters and will replace the aging 378' High Endurance Hamilton class cutters that have been in service since the 1960s.

      Make history and be part of this important event! Take ownership interest in the first day of the USCGC WAESCHE, named for Admiral R.R. WAESCHE, Commandant of the Coast Guard during World War Two. Share the pride when this beautiful ship comes to life, manned by the outstanding men and women of today's modern Coast Guard. Your tax-deductable contribution makes a real difference in the lives of the Coast Guard personnel. Come and show your support, stand alongside us, and applaud the sacrifices of our men and women.

      Please make checks payable to "CCCNLUS" and mail your donation to:
      Navy League
      875-A Island Drive, Suite 398
      Alameda, CA 94502

      Websites: http://www.uscgcwaesche.com and www.uscg.mil/pacarea/CGCWaesche

      Point of Contact:
      Jeanne Sharkey
      Navy League of the United States
      bjsharkey at yahoo dot com | (925) 228-1375

      Levels of Support and Recognition:

      All donors will be listed in the donors' brochure and will receive an invitation to the commissioning ceremony. All donations are 501 C3 tax-deductible (ID #68-0114586) to the extent permissible by the law and tax codes.

      PLATINUM: $10,000 — Honorary Plank Owners Plank; invitations for 8 to the Chair/Commanding Officer's Reception; WAESCHE Captain's ball cap for 8; recognition in the Commemorative Program; ship's coin for 8; membership in the Chair's Circle; invitations for 8 to the Donors' Luncheon; invitations for 8 to the Pre- Commissioning Breakfast, individual seating for 8 in the VVIP section for the Commissioning Ceremony.

      GOLD: $5,000 — Honorary Plank Owners Plank; invitations for 6 to the Chair/Commanding Officer's Reception; WAESCHE Captain's ball caps for 6; recognition in the Commemorative Program; ship's coins for 6; membership in the Chair's Circle; invitations for 6 to the Donors' Luncheon; invitations for 6 to the Pre-Commissioning Breakfast; individual seating for 6 in the VVIP section for the Commissioning Ceremony.

      SILVER: $2,500 — Honorary Plank Owners Plank; invitations for 4 to the Chair/Commanding Officer's Reception; WAESCHE Captain's ball caps for 4; recognition in the Commemorative Program; ship's coins for 4; membership in the Chair's Circle; invitations for 4 to the Donors' Luncheon; invitations for 4 to the Pre-Commissioning Breakfast; individual seating for 4 in the VVIP section for the Commissioning Ceremony.

      BRONZE: $1,000 — Honorary Plank Owners Plank; invitations for 2 to the Chair/Commanding Officer's Reception; WAESCHE Captain's ball caps for 2; recognition in the Commemorative Program; ship's coins for 2; invitations for 2 to the Donors' Reception; individual seating for 2 in the VIP section for the Commissioning Ceremony.

      BRIDGE: $500 — Honorary Plank Owners Plank; WAESCHE Captain's ball caps for 2; recognition in the Commemorative Program; ship's coins for 2; invitations for 2 to the Donors' Reception, individual seating for 2 in the VIP section for the Commissioning Ceremony.

      ANCHOR: $ 250 — WAESCHE ball caps for 2; recognition in the Commemorative Program; ship's coins for 2; individual seating for 2 in the VIP section. for the Commissioning Ceremony.

      KEEL: $100 — Recognition in the Commemorative Program; ship's coins for 2; individual seating in the VIP section for the Commissioning Ceremony.

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