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2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event NYC Oct. 15-18

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  • Pacific Merchant Marine Council
    The Pacific Merchant Marine Council commends the Port of Long Beach for staging its Green Port Fest October 3. The event included more than 70 booths and
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 17, 2009
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      The Pacific Merchant Marine Council commends the Port of Long Beach for staging its Green Port Fest October 3. The event included more than 70 booths and exhibits, children’s activities, entertainment, food, boat and rail tours and much more. The event website, http://www.uscg.mil/worldmaritimeday/docs/Schedule%20of%20Events%20Long%20Beach.pdf, and poster http://www.polb.com/community/portfest/default.asp discusses some of highlights of this year's Green Port Fest.

      Long Beach was the only Pacific Coast port to have a 2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event. Possibly a World Maritime Day Parallel Event can be incorporated into or subsitute for 2010 San Francisco Fleet Week.

      Anyone willing to serve on a 2010 World Maritime Day committee?

      Phelps
      ______________________________________________________

      2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event

      World Maritime Day Parallel Event Spnsors The United States is hosting the 2009 International Maritime Organization (IMO) World Maritime Day Parallel Event. The Parallel Event is being co-sponsored by the Department of State, Coast Guard, Environmental Protection Agency, Maritime Administration, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The theme for the 2009 event is Climate Change; A Challenge for IMO Too! The United States Parallel Event will be held in New York City on October 16-18, 2009. Various other ports throughout the United States will be hosting simultaneous events in their location. Additional information on other port events can be found at our World Maritime Day & Your Port webpage. The goal of World Maritime Day is to attract public, private, and government attention to the many environmental initiatives within the maritime community to reduce the effects of climate change. 

      World Maritime Day 2009; Climate Change

      The United States is hosting the 2009 International Maritime Organization (IMO) World Maritime Day Parallel Event with celebrations held in New York City from 15 to 18 October 2009.

      Event website: http://www.uscg.mil/worldmaritimeday.

      The World Maritime Day Parallel Event was held at Chelsea Piers, New York City, on Friday, 16 October 2009.

      It will focus on this year's theme "CLIMATE CHANGE: A challenge for IMO too!" and comprised a delegates' conference and public outreach activities which include an industry exhibition, vessel tours, and a student science fair and design competition.

      The public outreach activities will continue throughout the weekend.

      More details are also available in IMO Circular letter No.2970. 

       ______________________________________________________

       
       
      World Maritime Day

      Every year IMO celebrates World Maritime Day. The exact date is left to individual Governments but is usually celebrated during the last week in September. The day is used to focus attention on the importance of shipping safety, maritime security and the marine environment and to emphasize a particular aspect of IMO's work.

      To mark the occasion, the Secretary-General of IMO always prepares a special message and this is backed up by a paper which discusses the selected subject in greater depth. (The Secretary-General's World Maritime Day message is also available as an audio presentation in English.)

      World Maritime Day 2009: Climate change: a challenge for IMO too!

      World Maritime Day 2009 will be celebrated at the Organization's Headquarters on Thursday, 24 September 2009.

      The theme for World Maritime Day 2009 is "Climate change: a challenge for IMO too!".

      The 2009 World Maritime Day parallel event will be hosted by the United States.

      ______________________________________________________
       

      Introduction to IMO

      IMO Headquarters, LondonShipping is perhaps the most international of the world's industries, serving more than 90 per cent of global trade by carrying huge quantities of cargo cost effectively, cleanly and safely.

      The ownership and management chain surrounding any ship can embrace many countries and ships spend their economic life moving between different jurisdictions, often far from the country of registry. There is, therefore, a need for international standards to regulate shipping - which can be adopted and accepted by all. The first maritime treaties date back to the 19th century. Later, the Titanic disaster of 1912 spawned the first international safety of life at sea - SOLAS - convention, still the most important treaty addressing maritime safety.

      The Convention establishing the International Maritime Organization (IMO) was adopted in Geneva in 1948 and IMO first met in 1959. IMO's main task has been to develop and maintain a comprehensive regulatory framework for shipping and its remit today includes safety, environmental concerns, legal matters, technical co-operation, maritime security and the efficiency of shipping.

      A specialized agency of the United Nations with 169 Member States and three Associate Members, IMO is based in the United Kingdom with around 300 international staff.

      IMO's specialized
      committees and sub-committees are the focus for the technical work to update existing legislation or develop and adopt new regulations, with meetings attended by maritime experts from Member Governments, together with those from interested intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations.

      The result is a comprehensive body of international conventions, supported by hundreds of recommendations governing every facet of shipping. There are, firstly, measures aimed at the prevention of accidents, including standards for ship design, construction, equipment, operation and manning - key treaties include SOLAS, the
      MARPOL convention for the prevention of pollution by ships and the STCW convention on standards of training for seafarers.


      Then there are measures which recognize that accidents do happen, including rules concerning distress and safety communications, the International Convention on Search and Rescue and the
      International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation.

      Thirdly, there are conventions which establish compensation and liability regimes - including the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, the convention establishing the International Fund for Compensation for Oil Pollution Damage and the Athens Convention covering liability and compensation for passengers at sea.

      Inspection and monitoring of compliance are the responsibility of member States, but the adoption of a Voluntary IMO Member State Audit Scheme is expected to play a key role in enhancing implementation of IMO standards.

      IMO has an extensive technical co-operation programme, which identifies needs among resource-shy Members and matches them to assistance, such as training. IMO has founded three advanced level maritime educational institutes in Malmö, Malta and Trieste.

      Today, we live in a society which is supported by a global economy, which simply could not function if it were not for shipping. IMO plays a key role in ensuring that lives at sea are not put at risk and that the marine environment is not polluted by shipping - as summed up in IMO's mission statement: Safe, Secure and Efficient Shipping on Clean Oceans.

      International memorial to seafarersIMO Memorial to Seafarers
      In September 2001 the international memorial to the world’s seafarers, past, present and future, was unveiled at IMO Headquarters. The memorial, a seven-metre high, ten-tonne bronze representation of the bow of a cargo ship with a lone seafarer on the deck, is the work of internationally renowned sculptor Michael Sandle. Its dramatic configuration and massive scale have transformed the front of the IMO building and created a major new London landmark on the Thames riverfront.

      Brief history of IMO
      It has always been recognized that the best way of improving safety at sea is by developing international regulations that are followed by all shipping nations and from the mid-19th century onwards a number of such treaties were adopted. Several countries proposed that a permanent international body should be established to promote maritime safety more effectively, but it was not until the establishment of the United Nations itself that these hopes were realized. In 1948 an international conference in Geneva adopted a convention formally establishing IMO (the original name was the Inter-Governmental Maritime Consultative Organization, or IMCO, but the name was changed in 1982 to IMO).

      The IMO Convention entered into force in 1958 and the new Organization met for the first time the following year.

      The purposes of the Organization, as summarized by Article 1(a) of the Convention, are "to provide machinery for cooperation among Governments in the field of governmental regulation and practices relating to technical matters of all kinds affecting shipping engaged in international trade; to encourage and facilitate the general adoption of the highest practicable standards in matters concerning maritime safety, efficiency of navigation and prevention and control of marine pollution from ships". The Organization is also empowered to deal with administrative and legal matters related to these purposes.

      IMO's first task was to adopt a new version of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), the most important of all treaties dealing with maritime safety. This was achieved in 1960 and IMO then turned its attention to such matters as the facilitation of international maritime traffic, load lines and the carriage of dangerous goods, while the system of measuring the tonnage of ships was revised.

      But although safety was and remains IMO's most important responsibility, a new problem began to emerge - pollution. The growth in the amount of oil being transported by sea and in the size of oil tankers was of particular concern and the Torrey Canyon disaster of 1967, in which 120,000 tonnes of oil was spilled, demonstrated the scale of the problem.

      During the next few years IMO introduced a series of measures designed to prevent tanker accidents and to minimize their consequences. It also tackled the environmental threat caused by routine operations such as the cleaning of oil cargo tanks and the disposal of engine room wastes - in tonnage terms a bigger menace than accidental pollution.

      The most important of all these measures was the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto (MARPOL 73/78). It covers not only accidental and operational oil pollution but also pollution by chemicals, goods in packaged form, sewage, garbage and air pollution.

      IMO was also given the task of establishing a system for providing compensation to those who had suffered financially as a result of pollution. Two treaties were adopted, in 1969 and 1971, which enabled victims of oil pollution to obtain compensation much more simply and quickly than had been possible before. Both treaties were amended in 1992, and again in 2000, to increase the limits of compensation payable to victims of pollution. A number of other legal conventions have been developed since, most of which concern liability and compensation issues.

      Also in the 1970s a global search and rescue system was initiated, with the establishment of the International Mobile Satellite Organization (IMSO), which has greatly improved the provision of radio and other messages to ships.

      The Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) was adopted in 1988 and began to be phased in from 1992. In February 1999, the GMDSS became fully operational, so that now a ship that is in distress anywhere in the world can be virtually guaranteed assistance, even if the ship's crew do not have time to radio for help, as the message will be transmitted automatically.

      Two initiatives in the 1990s are especially important insofar as they relate to the human element in shipping. On 1 July 1998 the International Safety Management Code entered into force and became applicable to passenger ships, oil and chemical tankers, bulk carriers, gas carriers and cargo high speed craft of 500 gross tonnage and above. It became applicable to other cargo ships and mobile offshore drilling units of 500 gross tonnage and above from 1 July 2002.

      On 1 February 1997, the 1995 amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978 entered into force. They greatly improve seafarer standards and, for the first time, give IMO itself powers to check Government actions with Parties required to submit information to IMO regarding their compliance with the Convention.

      New conventions relating to the marine environment were adopted in the early 2000s, including one on anti-fouling sytems (AFS 2001) and ballast water management (BWM 2004).

      The 2000s also saw a focus on maritime security, with the entry into force in July 2004 of a new, comprehensive security regime for international shipping, including the International Shiip and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code, made mandatory under amendments to SOLAS adopted in 2002.

      In 2005, IMO adopted amendments to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts (SUA) Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation, 1988 and its related Protocol (the 2005 SUA Protocols), which amongst other things, introduce the right of a a State Party desires to board a ship flying the flag of another State Party when the requesting Party has reasonable grounds to suspect that the ship or a person on board the ship is, has been, or is about to be involved in, the commission of an offence under the Convention.

      As IMO instruments have entered into force and been implemented, developments in technology and/or lessons learned from accidents have led to changes and amendments being adopted.

      The focus on implementation continues, with the technical co-operation programme a key strand of IMO's work.

      Meanwhile, the first audits under the Voluntary IMO Member State Audit Scheme were completed at the end of 2006.

      About IMO
      IMO 60 years
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      World Maritime Day
      Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
      Site Index
      GISIS: Global Integrated Shipping Information System
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      IMO: What it is, what it does and how it works
      L’OMI: ce qu’elle est, ce qu’elle fait...
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      What is IMO? Poster (PDF)
      What is IMO? (Powerpoint)

    • usaseapower
      FROM: grandtrans2000 at sbcglobal dot net DATE: Sat, 17 Oct 2009 22:40:52 -0700 SUBJECT: RE: [PMMC-NLUS] 2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event NYC Oct. 15-18
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 18, 2009
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        FROM: grandtrans2000 at sbcglobal dot net
        DATE: Sat, 17 Oct 2009 22:40:52 -0700
        SUBJECT: RE: [PMMC-NLUS] 2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event NYC Oct. 15-18

        What great event. Would love to be on the world maritime committee and suggest it be in May during maritime "week" which gives us enough time to plan it if we start working on it now.

        Sam Sause, General Manager
        Grand Transport
        Tel: 510-865-0993
        --------------------
        FROM: Bazeley at comcast dot net
        DATE: Sun, 18 Oct 2009 04:07:48 -0700
        SUBJECT: RE: [PMMC-NLUS] 2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event NYC Oct. 15-18

        I would like to consider serving on such a committee, as it is a good experience fit with my transportation safety, environmental law, and public policy background and educational experience.

        Roger Bazeley
        PMMC-NLUS
        Transportation: Planning, Policy, Safety and Marketing
        --------------------

        Thank you Sam and Roger. We have the start of a committee. We definitely should do something in May but October has possibilities too.

        Phelps
      • edward dangler
        president phelps-- i ditto sam sause comments a out having orld maritime day with may for maritime week,   it could attract more participation of world
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 18, 2009
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          President Phelps-- I ditto Sam Sause's comments for our having a world maritime day with May for maritime week,
           
          It could attract more participation within the world shipping industry. I would be delighted to serve on such committee if held in May.  As you know I am in Soutnern France this season and usually every fall through the end of January.  We moved into the apartment here in Cannes on Friday evening.
           
          Best Regards to PMMC..
           
           
          Ed Dangler, Esq.  Proctor in Admiralty
          CAPT USN (ret)
          Master- tonnage oceans unlimited

          --- On Sun, 10/18/09, usaseapower <nlsac@...> wrote:

          From: usaseapower <nlsac@...>
          Subject: [PMMC-NLUS] Re: 2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event NYC Oct. 15-18
          To: PMMC-NLUS@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, October 18, 2009, 9:29 AM

           

          FROM: grandtrans2000 at sbcglobal dot net
          DATE: Sat, 17 Oct 2009 22:40:52 -0700
          SUBJECT: RE: [PMMC-NLUS] 2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event NYC Oct. 15-18

          What great event. Would love to be on the world maritime committee and suggest it be in May during maritime "week" which gives us enough time to plan it if we start working on it now.

          Sam Sause, General Manager
          Grand Transport
          Tel: 510-865-0993
          ------------ --------
          FROM: Bazeley at comcast dot net
          DATE: Sun, 18 Oct 2009 04:07:48 -0700
          SUBJECT: RE: [PMMC-NLUS] 2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event NYC Oct. 15-18

          I would like to consider serving on such a committee, as it is a good experience fit with my transportation safety, environmental law, and public policy background and educational experience.

          Roger Bazeley
          PMMC-NLUS
          Transportation: Planning, Policy, Safety and Marketing
          ------------ --------

          Thank you Sam and Roger. We have the start of a committee. We definitely should do something in May but October has possibilities too.

          Phelps


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