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RE: [PMMC-NLUS] Re: World's Largest Cargo Ship - Emma Maersk

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  • capt.ob@comcast.net
    I went to sea for many years, both in the foc sl and on the bridge. I sailed in only American Flag, Union contract vessels. I was paid well for my labor and
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 2, 2009
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      I went to sea for many years, both in the foc'sl and on the bridge. I sailed in only American Flag, Union contract vessels. I was paid well for my labor and knowledge. When one goes to sea, one should be aware of the hardships.
      I enjoyed great benefits and plenty of paid vacation time off. Our contract (MM&P) called for only 120 day assignments, with usually 120 paid vacation to follow. Sailing Bosn, Carpenter ,Quartermaster and A.B.  I was limited to 210 days assignments...As far as 300 day assignments, I say "more days=more dollars" If one can't take the hardships, one should go ashore and be a ribbon clerk.The seais a calling, not a job.

       Captain K.C. O'Brien,MM&P (ret)

      ----- Original Message -----

      From: Sam Sause

      To: PMMC-NLUS@yahoogroups.com

      Sent: Thu, 2 Jul 2009 06:08:32 +0000 (UTC)

      Subject: RE: [PMMC-NLUS] Re: World's Largest Cargo Ship - Emma Maersk































          


                  

            

















      Great article John

      –You raise some really good points, but I couldn’t help but think

      about how this modern technology in creating  a much faster turnaround has

      affected the  human  factor -- the seafarer  -- who sails both

      the “wet” and the “dry” vessels and who through this modernization

      and advanced technology are faced with shorter and shorter times in port,

      sometimes as little as 8 – 10 hours.   I totally support faster

      ships, new  efficiencies and new cranes that are all essential to reducing

      the turnaround time and lay time (“time is money”), but who is

      around to care for the seafarer who often signs a 300 day contract and may

      spend up to  250 days at sea,  with the remaining   50 days

      in port that is broken up into 10 to 20 hour port calls.  It is mostly  the 

      seafarers centers around the world,  who step in to meet and greet the

      seafarers when they arrive in port


      and to provide support services to them that include, but not limited to, counseling,

      meals recreational activities, telephones, internet access, transportation and

      advocacy.





       





      One of these seafarer’s

      centers is the Oakland  International Maritime Center (website: sfbayfarer.org)

      which is currently being operated by the Bay Area Seafarers Service (BASS) who

      have just merged their operation with the Seamen’s church institute (SCI)

      of New York (seamenschurch.org).  SCI will be taking over the entire BASS operation

      later this month.    I invite you to look at these two websites,

      especially the SCI one (seamenschurch.org) to see what the waterfront ministry

      is all about.  Keep in mind that it is about caring for seafarers, not about

      proselytizing.





      Sam









       





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    • Nelson Combs
      I worked on some Marine Firemen s Union and SIU benefit plans over a period of twenty years. What the old timers seemed to complain about was the lack of the
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 2, 2009
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        I worked on some Marine Firemen's Union and SIU benefit plans over a period of twenty years. What the old timers seemed to complain about was the lack of the romance of the fast turn world of shipping. Gone are the copra runs and the slow turn in some ports in Asia where a nice long liberty could produce adventures. (I don't know if "liberty" is the right word in the merchant marines, but that's what we used to call "time enough in a port of call to go ashore and get into trouble" in the Navy.
        Nelson Combs
      • Phelps Hobart
        ... From: Captain K. C.O Brien, (MM&P Ret) To: Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 4:58 PM Subject: Re: [PMMC-NLUS] Re: World s
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 2, 2009
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Captain K. C.O'Brien, (MM&P Ret)

          To: Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS
          Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 4:58 PM
          Subject: Re: [PMMC-NLUS] Re: World's Largest Cargo Ship - Emma Maersk


          In 50 years of seafaring, I don't think I ever sailed in a ship that didn't have Filipino seamen. They are the most seafaring people to be found in all nations flags ships.

          They always have been known to be sober, industrious and honest. Many have been terribly abused by some shipowners....They are also known to undercut the wages of mariners everywhere......In the last few years, the shipowners have been able to undercut the Filipino seamen's wages by hiring Chinese from the People's Republic of China.

          I have been a generous contributor to Oakland Center(mostly Filipino seamen) and for over 40years the Seaman's Church Institute of New York (Elizabeth,NJ).

          I bought and donated the doors, hardware and other construction material for Oakland.

          I have heard that the Chinese seaman are contracted for a year....largely from the inner country..They are paid $100.00 in advance for one year on the ship.Their wives accompany them to the sign in and receive the money.

          I have heard horror stories of forign seaman being stranded in foreign ports, not paid, just abandoned.

          Thank God I am an American, and sailed only Union Contracted, US Flag ships.

          Captain K. C.O'Brien, (MM&P Ret)
        • capt.ob@comcast.net
          Dear Brother Combs, I heartily agree!...When I started out in Knot Ships,Libertys , Victorys, and other boom ships, we would sometimes stay in port for as
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 2, 2009
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            Dear Brother Combs,

            I heartily agree!...When I started out in    Knot Ships,Libertys , Victorys, and other "boom" ships, we would sometimes stay in port for as long as 1-2 weeks.I remember laying at Vung Tau (Cape St.Jaques) Viet-Nam for as long as two weeks,waiting for our turn to go up the river to Saigon.Even if we couldn't go alongside right away,   we     sometimes would anchor outside the river bar in Bangkok for a week, where a plethora of "bum boats" swarmed around the ship, loaded with fruits, veggies, fish, girls and booze. During a shuttle from Viet-Nam to Japan and Tawan, we kept ending up in Keelung, where the old man had a girlfriend. We would make fast to another ship and wait for orders from the US Navy, sometimes for a week or ten days.Retiring from container ships....20-24 hours turn around was about right.Once after a hurricane, we entered SanJuan PR to find all the cranes but one turned over. The one standing didn't work.
            It took us two weeks to discharge all our boxes, and load mt's.The longshoremen begin with a cherry picker to    take off all the high boxes, sowe could move down the pier to the straight, horizontal crane that was used to load/disch boxes from barges.

            Today it seems all the romance of old is gone...Container ports are oftenl ocated far from town, and are bleak, dangerous, depressing places to be.(Oakland, Newark, Elizabeth, etc) Many of us didn't even bother to go ashore, but stay aboard to catch up on our sleep...

            Gone are the days of port calls at Port Moresby,New Guinea, Rabual, Kaveing,Townsville, Cairns, Thursday Island, Madang,Christ Church New Zealand,
            Rio, Buenos Aires, Montivadao,Valpariso, Maricibo, Aruba...and more forgotten.

            Excuse my spelling and puncuation as I am tired.

            Steady As She Goes,   OBie

            ----- Original Message -----

            From: Nelson Combs

            To: PMMC-NLUS@yahoogroups.com

            Sent: Thu, 2 Jul 2009 23:12:30 +0000 (UTC)

            Subject: RE: [PMMC-NLUS] Re: World's Largest Cargo Ship - Emma Maersk































                


                        

                  

               I worked on some Marine Firemen's Union and SIU benefit plans over a period of twenty years.  What the old timers seemed to complain about was the lack of the romance of the fast turn world of shipping.  Gone are the copra runs and the slow turn in some ports in Asia where a nice long liberty could produce adventures.  (I don't know if "liberty" is the right word in the merchant marines, but that's what we used to call "time enough in a port of call to go ashore and get into trouble" in the Navy.


                 Nelson Combs








                
              



                

                

                

                




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