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Anti-piracy Force Thwarts Attack

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  • Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS
    We will continue to monitor the scourge of piracy. If resources can be reassigned the US Navy may become more involved. Anticipate piracy as a focus at one of
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 18 9:49 AM
      We will continue to monitor the scourge of piracy.
       
      If resources can be reassigned the US Navy may become more involved.
       
      Anticipate piracy as a focus at one of our 2009 council luncheons.
       
      Phelps
       
      PS  Our luncheons will be transferred from the 2nd Monday of March, June, and September to the 3rd Monday. We will meet on other dates as well. Our next luncheon will be a salute to the American Merchant Marine Veterans aboard the O'BRIEN 1130 Monday, March 16.
       
      ________________________________

      Anti-piracy Force Thwarts Attack

      December 17, 2008
      Associated Press
       

      SAN'A, Yemen - An international anti-piracy force thwarted the attempted takeover of a Chinese cargo ship off the Somali coast on Wednesday, sending in attack helicopters that fired on the bandits and forced them to abandon the ship they had boarded.

      In another blow to the region's thriving piracy trade, the Indian navy handed over 23 pirates it caught at sea to authorities in Yemen.

      In Wednesday's assault, nine pirates armed with guns overtook the Chinese ship with speedboats and boarded the vessel, said Noel Choong, who heads the International Maritime Bureau's piracy reporting center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

      He said the 30-member crew sent a distress message to the bureau as it saw the pirates approaching, then barricaded themselves inside their living quarters. Choong said the bureau quickly alerted the international naval force, which dispatched two helicopters and a warship.

      "Two helicopters arrived at the scene first and helped deter the hijacking. They fired at the pirates, forcing them to flee the ship," he said. There were no injuries during the five-hour ordeal.

      "The Chinese ship is very fortunate to have escaped. This is a rare case where pirates have successfully boarded the ship but failed to hijack it," he added.

      Somali pirates, spurred by widespread poverty in their homeland, have hijacked more than 40 vessels off their country's coastline this year. Many of the seizures have taken place in the Gulf of Aden, which lies between Somalia and Yemen and is one of the world's busiest waterways. Many of the vessels are taken to pirate-controlled regions in Somalia, where they are held for ransom.

      China's official Xinhua News Agency identified the boat involved in the latest attempt as the Zhenhua 4 and said it belonged to China Communications Construction Co. and was registered in the Caribbean island of St. Vincent.

      It was the latest in a series of attacks by Somali pirates on Chinese vessels. On Tuesday, China said it was considering sending warships to the area to help battle piracy.

      The announcement came during a unanimous U.N. Security Council vote to authorize nations to conduct land and air attacks on pirate bases on the coast of Somalia.

      "The area is just too wide to patrol. Hopefully with the U.N. resolution, there will be more firm action to stop this menace," Choong said.

      Chinese Vice Foreign Minister He Yafei told the council that China was considering sending warships to the Gulf of Aden to join ships from the U.S., Russia, Denmark, Italy and other countries.

      In Yemen, meanwhile, the Indian navy handed over 23 pirates arrested in the Gulf of Aden last Saturday after they threatened a merchant vessel in the lawless waters off the Yemeni coast, a Yemeni security official said.

      The Indian sailors boarded two pirate boats and seized what was described as a substantial arms cache and equipment at the time. The security official said the pirates included 12 Somalis and 11 Yemenis.

      The handover took place in the southern port of Aden, and the pirates were to be interrogated and charged in court. He stressed that Yemen has the right to try Somali pirates because their arrest took place inside Yemeni waters.

      The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to media pending a government statement.

      ________________________________________

      UN adds teeth to anti-piracy effort

      Daily News

      17 Dec 2008

      THE UN Security Council has put more teeth in its anti-piracy policy by urging navies patrolling off Somalia to embark regional law enforcement officers to facilitate prosecution of captured pirates.
      The council also endorsed the permission granted by the Somali transitional federal government that allows foreign forces to take military action against pirate bases on Somali soil.

      • 1.
        Scoop.co.nz - Dec 17 5:02 PM
        SECRETARY RICE: Thank you very much. Thank you, Mr. President. Thank you, Mr. Secretary General. And thank you very much to all my colleagues for participating in this very important Security Council session on piracy.
      • 2.
        Washington Post - Dec 16 11:26 PM
        UNITED NATIONS, Dec. 16 -- The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Tuesday to authorize nations to conduct military raids, on land and by air, against pirates plying the waters off the Somalia coast even as two more ships were reportedly hijacked at sea.
      • 3.
        Scoop.co.nz - Dec 17 4:16 PM
        As the United Nations Security Council strengthened efforts today to fight piracy off the Somali coast, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon warned that the problem could not be divorced from the need to bring a comprehensive, inclusive peace to the war-torn country that has been without a functioning central government since 1991.
      • 4.
        The Canadian Press via Yahoo! Canada News - Dec 17 6:53 PM
        UNITED NATIONS - UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says there's almost no international support for sending a peacekeeping force to Somalia as proposed by the United States.
      • 5.
        Times of Malta - Dec 17 8:05 AM
        The United Nations Security Council has approved a US resolution authorising countries to pursue Somali pirates on land as well as at sea. The resolution gives those states already involved in fighting piracy off the Somali coast a one-year mandate to act against the buccaneers inside the country.
      • 6.
        Reuters via Yahoo!Xtra News - Dec 16 5:36 PM
        UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The U.N. Security Council on Tuesday authorized countries fighting piracy off the Somali coast to take action also on Somalia's territory and in its airspace, subject to consent by the country's government.
      • 7.
        The Hindu - Dec 16 11:43 PM
        UNITED NATIONS: Hailing American decision to set up a Contact Group to coordinate fight against piracy off the coast of Somalia, India has suggested a central role for the UN, saying it would give international legitimacy to any operations undertaken.
      • 8.
        Reuters via Yahoo!7 News - Dec 16 3:25 PM
        UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The U.N. Security Council on Tuesday authorized countries fighting piracy off the Somali coast to take action also on Somalia's territory and in its airspace, subject to consent by the country's government.
      • 9.
        New Kerala - Dec 16 11:25 PM
        By Lalit K. Jha, United Nations, Dec 17 : Expressing grave concern over the increasing instances of piracy off the coast of Somalia, India has called for enhanced international cooperation and institutionalised coordination for all efforts to deal with piracy.
      • 10.
        AlertNet - Dec 16 3:22 PM
        Source: Reuters (Adds U.S. push for U.N. peacekeeping force) By Patrick Worsnip UNITED NATIONS, Dec 16 (Reuters) - The U.N. Security Council on Tuesday authorized countries fighting piracy off the Somali coast to ...
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