Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Yo ho ho, these pirates might kill ya'

Expand Messages
  • Phelps Hobart
    News Stories for Pirates(Results 1 - 10 of about 20,302) Sort Results by: Relevance | Date
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 11, 2008
    • 0 Attachment

      News Stories for Pirates

      (Results 1 - 10 of about 20,302)
      Sort Results by: Relevance | Date
      • 1.
        Somali pirates target tanker, UN food ship in new attacks
        AFP via Yahoo! News - 2 hours, 13 minutes ago
        Pirates seized a tanker and attacked a UN food ship that escaped, officials said Saturday, the latest in a series of incidents off Somalia which have sparked worldwide concern.
      • 2.
        Somali pirates target tanker, UN food ship in latest attacks
        AFP via Yahoo! News - Oct 11 10:28 AM
        Pirates seized a tanker and attacked a UN food ship that escaped, officials said Saturday, in the latest in a series of incidents off Somalia that have sparked concern among Western powers.
      • 3.
        2nd ship seized as pirates threaten to blow up 1st
        AP via Yahoo! News - Oct 11 6:54 AM
        Armed pirates hijacked a massive tanker as world powers on Saturday headed toward the Somali coast to end a two-week standoff aboard a ship laden with tanks and weapons, officials said.
      • 4.
        Pirates threaten to blow up arms-laden ship
        AP via Yahoo! News - Oct 11 3:55 AM
        With U.S. warships lurking nearby, the pirates who hijacked an arms-laden Ukrainian tanker off Somalia threatened to destroy the vessel unless a ransom is paid, a spokesman for the bandits said.
      • 5.
        New York Times - Oct 11 4:05 AM
        While the audacity of a band of Somali pirates who recently hijacked a ship has grabbed the world?s attention, the suffering of millions of Somalis seems to go unnoticed.
      • 6.
        Somali pirates hijack Greek tanker: piracy watchdog
        AFP via Yahoo! News - Oct 11 3:31 AM
        Somali pirates seized a Greek tanker and separately attacked a World Food Programme-chartered ship, a maritime piracy watchdog said Saturday.
      • 7.
        Fox News - 2 hours, 39 minutes ago
        Armed pirates in speedboats hijacked a Greek chemical tanker with 20 crew members in the Gulf of Aden near Somalia, a maritime official said.
      • 8.
        UPI - Oct 11 11:23 AM
        MOGADISHU, Somalia, Oct. 11 (UPI) -- Pirates who have seized a Ukrainian ship and its crew have threatened to blow up the ship, which is laden with weapons, if they are not paid $8 million.
      • 9.
        Los Angeles Times - Oct 11 8:57 AM
        Armed pirates hijacked a massive tanker as world powers today headed toward the Somali coast to end a two-week standoff aboard a ship laden with tanks and weapons, officials said.
      • 10.
        National Geographic - 2 hours, 21 minutes ago
        African pirates threatened Friday to blow up the arms-laden Ukrainian ship they've hijacked--the latest salvo in a crisis that's boosting shipping costs and cutting off aid to millions of Somalis.


      "The industry asks in the statement for three specific things: a commitment to increased numbers of deployed warships in the Gulf of Aden and to their coordinated action; the renewal of UN Security Council resolution 1816 for a longer time frame and to strengthen the text on actions required to repress piracy and an agreement to establish a legal jurisdiction to identify and punish criminals under due process."

      When high pressure fire hoses are insufficient, the display and use of twin 50 cal. machine guns fore and aft and a few automatics inbetween might do the trick. Skip the agreement.  

      Phelps

       

       
       
       
       

      Shipping Piracy Appeal at Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC)

      Tuesday, 07 October 2008

      THE major shipping industry organizations broke with normal protocol yesterday by using the start of this week's IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee meeting to make an impassioned plea for action to protect merchant ships from pirates in the Gulf of Aden.

      A statement was read out on behalf of BIMCO, Intercargo, The International Group, InterManager, Intertanko, IPTA, ITF, IUMI, OCIMF, SIGTTO and ICS.

      It says: "As organizations we are looking forward to a week of debate on the environmental performance of shipping and not least on the challenge of reducing carbon emissions from international shipping. But the dreadful problem of piracy in the Gulf of Aden is also at the forefront of our mind.

      "Mr Chairman, such is the state of lawlessness in the Gulf of Aden that attacks on innocent merchant ships are taking place every single day. Ships and their crews are being captured and held to ransom by organized armed criminal gangs seemingly able to operate with impunity."

      The industry bodies note that, in June of this year, the UN Security Council adopted resolution 1816 that allowed States cooperating with Somalia's Transitional Federal Government to enter the country's territorial waters and use all the necessary means to repress acts of piracy and armed robbery in a manner consistent with action permitted on the High Seas.

      The statement adds: "The Secretary-General has recognized the massive scale of this issue and we are grateful for his personal intervention which led directly to the adoption of this resolution. It is a fundamental principle of UNCLOS that the High Seas shall be used for peaceful purposes and furthermore that all States shall co-operate to the fullest extent possible in the repression of piracy on the High Seas ….. These are the principles that also now apply in Somalian waters."

      The appeal continues: "So far, in a response to resolution 1816, some states have deployed a limited number of warships to the region. Mr. Chairman, this is an enormous area of water through which passes a significant portion of the world's trade and an even more significant percentage of its oil supply – more than 10% of the world's traded oil. At any one moment around 300 ships are passing through the area serving the needs of the nations and peoples of the world; their right to the freedom of the High Seas for lawful purposes is under intolerable threat from organized criminals. The stress on the captured crews and on other seafarers who listen to their frantic, often unanswered, radio calls for assistance can scarcely be imagined."

      The shipping bodies are: "The fact that successful attacks are being carried out with ruthless determination, virtually every single day and that a dozen ships and more than 250 seafarers are being held captive, today, demonstrates without a shadow of doubt that insufficient resources are being applied to this shocking problem. We could not imagine that such complacency would apply if civil aircraft were the target of unlawful attacks."

      Implicitly referring to comments by senior naval figures the statement continues: "Calls for the industry to arm itself for protection are inappropriate, and only serve to deepen the sense of lawlessness and the abandonment of international legal principles in these waters."

      The industry asks in the statement for three specific things: a commitment to increased numbers of deployed warships in the Gulf of Aden and to their coordinated action; the renewal of UN Security Council resolution 1816 for a longer time frame and to strengthen the text on actions required to repress piracy and an agreement to establish a legal jurisdiction to identify and punish criminals under due process.


      United Nations Resolution 1816 (2008)
      Adopted by the Security Council at its 5902nd meeting on 2 June 2008

      The Security Council,
          Recalling its previous resolutions and the statements of its President concerning the situation in Somalia,
      Gravely concerned by the threat that acts of piracy and armed robbery against vessels pose to the prompt, safe and effective delivery of humanitarian aid to Somalia, the safety of commercial maritime routes and to international navigation,
          Expressing its concerns at the quarterly reports from the International Maritime Organization (IMO) since 2005, which provide evidence of continuing piracy and armed robbery in particular in the waters off the coast of Somalia,
      Affirming that international law, as reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 10 December 1982 ("the Convention"), sets out the legal framework applicable to combating piracy and armed robbery, as well as other ocean activities,
          Reaffirming the relevant provisions of international law with respect to the repression of piracy, including the Convention, and recalling that they provide guiding principles for cooperation to the fullest possible extent in the repression of piracy on the high seas or in any other place outside the jurisdiction of any state, including but not limited to boarding, searching, and seizing vessels engaged in or suspected of engaging in acts of piracy, and to apprehending persons engaged in such acts with a view to such persons being prosecuted,
          Reaffirming its respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia, Taking into account the crisis situation in Somalia, and the lack of capacity of the Transitional Federal Government (TFG) to interdict pirates or patrol and secure either the international sea lanes off the coast of Somalia or Somalia's territorial waters,
          Deploring the recent incidents of attacks upon and hijacking of vessels in the territorial waters and on the high seas off the coast of Somalia including attacks upon and hijackings of vessels operated by the World Food Program and numerous commercial vessels and the serious adverse impact of these attacks on the prompt, safe and effective delivery of food aid and other humanitarian assistance to the people of Somalia, and the grave dangers they pose to vessels, crews, passengers, and cargo,
          Noting the letters to the Secretary-General from the Secretary-General of the IMO dated 5 July 2007 and 18 September 2007 regarding the piracy problems off the coast of Somalia and the IMO Assembly resolution A.1002 (25), which strongly urged Governments to increase their efforts to prevent and repress, within the provisions of international law, acts of piracy and armed robbery against vessels irrespective of where such acts occur, and recalling the joint communiqué of the IMO and the World Food Programme of 10 July 2007,
          Taking note of the Secretary-General's letter of 9 November 2007 to the President of the Security Council reporting that the Transitional Federal Government of Somalia (TFG) needs and would welcome international assistance to address the problem,
          Taking further note of the letter from the Permanent Representative of the Somali Republic to the United Nations to the President of the Security Council dated 27 February 2008, conveying the consent of the TFG to the Security Council for urgent assistance in securing the territorial and international waters off the coast of Somalia for the safe conduct of shipping and navigation,    
          Determining that the incidents of piracy and armed robbery against vessels in the territorial waters of Somalia and the high seas off the coast of Somalia exacerbate the situation in Somalia, which continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security in the region,
          Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,
          1. Condemns and deplores all acts of piracy and armed robbery against vessels in territorial waters and the high seas off the coast of Somalia;
          2. Urges States whose naval vessels and military aircraft operate on the high seas and airspace off the coast of Somalia to be vigilant to acts of piracy and armed robbery and, in this context, encourages, in particular, States interested in the use of commercial maritime routes off the coast of Somalia, to increase and coordinate their efforts to deter acts of piracy and armed robbery at sea in cooperation with the TFG;
          3. Urges all States to cooperate with each other, with the IMO and, as appropriate, with the relevant regional organizations in connection with, and share information about, acts of piracy and armed robbery in the territorial waters and on the high seas off the coast of Somalia, and to render assistance to vessels threatened by or under attack by pirates or armed robbers, in accordance with relevant international law;
          4. Further urges States to work in cooperation with interested organizations, including the IMO, to ensure that vessels entitled to fly their flag receive appropriate guidance and training on avoidance, evasion, and defensive techniques and to avoid the area whenever possible;
          5. Calls upon States and interested organizations, including the IMO, to provide technical assistance to Somalia and nearby coastal States upon their request to enhance the capacity of these States to ensure coastal and maritime security, including combating piracy and armed robbery off the Somali and nearby coastlines;
          6. Affirms that the measures imposed by paragraph 5 of resolution 733 (1992) and further elaborated upon by paragraphs 1 and 2 of resolution 1425 (2002) do not apply to supplies of technical assistance to Somalia solely for the purposes set out in paragraph 5 above which have been exempted from those measures in accordance with the procedure set out in paragraphs 11 (b) and 12 of resolution 1772 (2007);
          7. Decides that for a period of six months from the date of this resolution, States cooperating with the TFG in the fight against piracy and armed robbery at sea off the coast of Somalia, for which advance notification has been provided by the TFG to the Secretary-General, may:
              (a) Enter the territorial waters of Somalia for the purpose of repressing acts of piracy and armed robbery at sea, in a manner consistent with such action permitted on the high seas with respect to piracy under relevant international law; and
              (b) Use, within the territorial waters of Somalia, in a manner consistent with action permitted on the high seas with respect to piracy under relevant international law, all necessary means to repress acts of piracy and armed robbery;
          8. Requests that cooperating states take appropriate steps to ensure that the activities they undertake pursuant to the authorization in paragraph 7 do not have the practical effect of denying or impairing the right of innocent passage to the ships of any third State;
          9. Affirms that the authorization provided in this resolution applies only with respect to the situation in Somalia and shall not affect the rights or obligations or responsibilities of member states under international law, including any rights or obligations under the Convention, with respect to any other situation, and underscores in particular that it shall not be considered as establishing customary international law, and affirms further that this authorization has been provided only following receipt of the letter from the Permanent Representative of the Somalia Republic to the United Nations to the President of the Security Council dated 27 February 2008 conveying the consent of the TFG;
          10. Calls upon States to coordinate their actions with other participating States taken pursuant to paragraphs 5 and 7 above;
          11. Calls upon all States, and in particular flag, port and coastal States, States of the nationality of victims and perpetrators or piracy and armed robbery, and other States with relevant jurisdiction under international law and national legislation, to cooperate in determining jurisdiction, and in the investigation and prosecution of persons responsible for acts of piracy and armed robbery off the coast of Somalia, consistent with applicable international law including international human rights law, and to render assistance by, among other actions, providing disposition and logistics assistance with respect to persons under their jurisdiction and control, such victims and witnesses and persons detained as a result of operations conducted under this resolution; S/RES/1816 (2008) 08-36177 4
          12. Requests States cooperating with the TFG to inform the Security Council within 3 months of the progress of actions undertaken in the exercise of the authority provided in paragraph 7 above;
          13. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the Security Council within 5 months of adoption of this resolution on the implementation of this resolution and on the situation with respect to piracy and armed robbery in territorial waters and the high seas off the coast of Somalia;
          14. Requests the Secretary-General of the IMO to brief the Council on the basis of cases brought to his attention by the agreement of all affected coastal states, and duly taking into account the existing bilateral and regional cooperative arrangements, on the situation with respect to piracy and armed robbery;
          15. Expresses its intention to review the situation and consider, as appropriate, renewing the authority provided in paragraph 7 above for additional periods upon the request of the TFG;
          16. Decides to remain seized of the matter.
    • Phelps Hobart
      [X-(] There are more than one post on the subject of Piracy. It again is in the news. Now it is on the front page of http://www.navyleague.org
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment

        X-(


        There are more than one post on the subject of Piracy. It again is in the news.  Now it is on the front page of http://www.navyleague.org .

        Check out these references including the November 2008 issue of Sea Power:

        http://www.navyleague.org/public_relations/Nov08/112108-NLUS-on-Piracy.php

        Navy League addresses piracy issue, its impact on maritime security

        "MDA (Maritime Domain Awareness) is also a major deterrent in the war on terror, piracy, drugs, smuggling, etc."

        -- Navy League's Maritime Policy Statement 2008-9 - Preserving Sea Power A National Imperative

        Nov. 21, 2008 - The serious nature of piracy on the high seas has been a topic of major concern that the Navy League has been addressing for several years. Well before the most recent media focus of this critical global maritime issue stemming from the ongoing increased and bolder pirate overtaking of ships and commercial super tankers by Somalian pirates in the Gulf of Aden, the Navy League has taken a strong position that this issue is one that greatly impacts our nation's maritime security and our freedom to navigate and trade along the open seas.

        Below are links to Navy League published documents and media interviews addressing the rising problem of piracy.

        SEAPOWER Articles

        "Piracy on the Rise" by Matt Hilburn, Nov 2008 (current issue pg 12 - electronic version)
        "Cops on the Beat" by Richard Burgess, Feb 2008
        "Piracy: Old Danger Becomes New Threat on the Open Seas" by David Munns,
        Oct. 2004 (cover story)

        SEAPOWER Editorials by Amy Wittman, Editor-in-Chief

        "Dangerous Waters" - Nov 2008 (current issue pg 12 - electronic version)
        "Turning Up the Heat" - Feb 2008

        Media Interviews - Nov. 7, 2005

        Stephen Pietropaoli, Navy League Executive Director
        CNBC video - CNBC Piracy Nov 7 2005CNN video - CNN Piracy Nov 7 2005 (there are a few seconds lead in)

        Yo ho ho, these pirates might kill ya'

        Phelps

        ______________________________________________

        --- In PMMC-NLUS@yahoogroups.com, "Phelps Hobart" <nlsac@...> wrote:

         News Stories for Pirates(Results 1 - 10 of about 20,302) Sort Results by: Relevance | Date

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.