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Re: California's mandate for fuel

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  • Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS
    Ahoy there, As presented in these two posts, we advised that California is going up against the United States with its Environmental Protection Agency mandate
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 5 3:25 AM
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      As presented in these two posts, we advised that California is going up against the United States with its Environmental Protection Agency mandate for cleaner burning fuels aboard ships within 24 miles of its coast.
       
       
      Here is the federal position:

      Maritime Pollution Prevention Act of 2008 To amend the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships to implement MARPOL Annex VI.

      President Bush signed this act into law 21 July 2008.
       
      We have brought this matter before NLUS national leadership but to date the Navy League has not taken a position. In the council's viewpoint, it is too important a matter not to clearly state where the Navy League stands.
       
      The American Association of Port Authorities, http://aapa-ports.org, is just one of the trade organizations that have taken a strong position on the matter. The Pacific Merchant Shipping Association, http://www.pmsaship.com, applauds the voluntary program supported by the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles.
       
      The council has yet to issue a statement on the matter but it likely that we will support H.R. 802, the Maritime Pollution Prevention Act of 2008. Instead of issuing our own statement we would prefer to support a NLUS position. We would like to see the Navy League be more proactive in the formulation of maritime legislation.
       
      Phelps
       
      OpenCongress is one of the resources we have to keep track of maritime legislation.
       

       
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      http://www.opencongress.org/bill/110-h802/show

      Maritime Pollution Prevention Act of 2008

      To amend the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships to implement MARPOL Annex VI.

      Other Bill Titles (8 more)

      7/8/2008--Public Law. (This measure has not been amended since it was passed by the Senate on June 26, 2008. The summary of that version is repeated here.) Maritime Pollution Prevention Act of 2008 -
      (Sec. 3) Amends the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (Act) to provide for ... moreSee Full Bill Text

      Amendments

      This bill has no amendments.



      Bill Status

      IntroducedresultVoted on by HouseresultVoted on by SenateresultConsidered By PresidentresultThis Bill Has Become Law
      February 05, 2007March 26, 2007June 26, 2008July 21, 2008July 21, 2008

      Latest Vote

      March 26, 2007Roll call number 187 in the House
      Question: On Motion to Suspend the Rules and Pass, as Amended: H R 802 Maritime Pollution Prevention Act
      Required percentage of 'Aye' votes: 2/3 (66%)Percentage of 'aye' votes: 82%Result: Passed
       

      See Full Voting History (1 votes)     Show All Actions (33 actions)


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      In the News feed

      July 11, 2008 Governors Urge Tighter Emissions Standards For Ships

      If signed into law, HR 802 would ratify an international treaty amendment focused on reducing air pollution from ships. Governor Kulongoski's spokeswoman ...

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      Source: OPB News, OR



      July 08, 2008 AAPA Hails Passage of Vessel Air Emissions Bill

      (BUSINESS WIRE)--The American Association of Port Authorities today praised Congress for passing HR 802, the Maritime Pollution Prevention Act, ...

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      Source: Business Wire (press release), CA


      9 more articles...
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      Blog Coverage feed

      August 21, 2008 Public Safety CommitteeCity of New York Queens (Physicians ...

      S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation06.27.2008 Senate Passes Maritime Pollution Prevention Act WASHINGTON, DC The US Senate approved HR 802, the Maritime Pollution Prevention Act (MARPOL Annex VI) by Source: ...

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      Source: physicians committee for responsible medicine


      August 12, 2008 Management Update

      ... Logistics services provider Sinotrans Group has agreed to merge with China Yangtze Transportation Group; Shippers add fuel surcharge to combat rising fuel costs; Congress passes the HR 802, the Maritime Pollution Prevention Act; ...

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      Source: Air Freight


      August 01, 2008 Management Update

      ... Logistics services provider Sinotrans Group has agreed to merge with China Yangtze Transportation Group; Shippers add fuel surcharge to combat rising fuel costs; Congress passes the HR 802, the Maritime Pollution Prevention Act; ...

      Was this article useful? Yes or No

      Source: Logistics Management - Freight Transportation...


      67 more posts...
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      AAPA: American Association of Port Authorities
       
      News Release
      FOR RELEASE - July 8, 2008
      Contact: Aaron Ellis,
      aellis@...
      703-254-7098
      American Association of Port Authorities
      1010 Duke Street
      Alexandria, VA 22314
      Phone: (703) 684-5700
      Fax: (703) 684-6321
      www.aapa-ports.org

      AAPA Hails Passage Of Vessel Air Emissions Bill

      The American Association of Port Authorities today praised Congress for passing H.R. 802, the Maritime Pollution Prevention Act, which will now be transmitted to President Bush for his signature. 

      The legislation will implement Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, more commonly known as MARPOL, providing air quality benefits for port communities in countries that are signatories to the treaty.  Annex VI is a global treaty that establishes emission limits for oxides of nitrogen (NOx), oxides of sulfur (SOx) and other pollutants from vessels.

      Kurt Nagle, AAPA's president and CEO, said the ports association has strongly advocated for tough new air emissions standards for both foreign and domestic ships that call on U.S. ports. "While land-based emissions and some marine emissions are the responsibility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, AAPA believes that an international process is the most effective for vessels, the majority of which are flagged in countries other than the U.S.," he said. "Considering that emissions from ocean-going ships are predicted to grow by more than 70 percent over the next 15 years, it's imperative that meaningful and effective air emissions standards be adopted to improve air quality."

      A U.S. delegation led by the EPA and U.S. Coast Guard, with support from AAPA and the World Shipping Council, played a lead role in negotiating a suite of amendments that will further reduce air emissions and particulate matter from ships.  The IMO's Marine Environment Protection Committee gave the amendments preliminary approval at its meeting last April.  Those amendments are expected to be adopted at the Committee's next meeting this October in London.

      The American Association of Port Authorities was founded in 1912 and today represents 160 of the leading public port authorities in the United States, Canada, Latin America and the Caribbean. In addition, the Association represents more than 300 sustaining and associate members, firms and individuals with an interest in the seaports of the Western Hemisphere. AAPA port members are public entities mandated by law to serve public purposes. They facilitate waterborne commerce and contribute to local, regional and national economic growth. These ports are gateways to world trade and are critical components to their nation’s economic health, national defense and growing cruise industry. In 2007, commercial seaport and marine cargo operations in the U.S. generated $3.2 trillion of total economic activity and provided jobs for 13.3 million Americans, whose earnings and consumption totaled nearly $650 billion.

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