Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Labor Day Salute

Expand Messages
  • Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS
    Dear Members and Friends, Labor Day is more than backyard BBQs with family and friends. It is a day to salute the working men and women of our nation. I
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 1 9:36 AM
    • 0 Attachment
       
      Dear Members and Friends,
       
      Labor Day is more than backyard BBQs with family and friends. It is a day to salute the working men and women of our nation. I personally automatically connect this to our mariners - our merchant seamen - afloat and our longshoremen and the others ashore moving cargo and seeing that passengers get to and fro safely.
       
      The Pacific Merchant Marine Council salutes the American workforce with a special emphasis to those afloat and on the docks. As President Bush so clearly states, "Their determined efforts add to the strength and vitality of our country and build a brighter future for America."
       
      Phelps
      Phelps Hobart, President
      Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS
       
      ______________________________________________________
       
       
      print-only banner
       
       

      Presidential Message, Labor Day 2008

      I send greetings to all Americans celebrating Labor Day 2008.

      In America, all citizens have an opportunity to forge their own paths forward, and their success is limited only by the size of their dreams. From engineering to healthcare and from small businesses to education, the American people are the most industrious, enterprising, and productive in the world. These talented and innovative workers provide for their families and play a vital role in building a more prosperous future for our country. By trusting in the ingenuity and creativity of America's risk-takers and dreamers, our country will remain the most vibrant, hopeful, and dynamic around the globe.

      Each year on Labor Day, we honor the dedicated men and women of our Nation's workforce. Their determined efforts add to the strength and vitality of our country and build a brighter future for America.

      Laura and I send our best wishes.

      GEORGE W. BUSH

      # # #


       
       
      LABOR DAY FAQs

      Q: When is Labor Day?
      A: Labor Day is celebrated on the first Monday in September. In 2008, Labor Day will fall on Sept. 1.

      Q: Why do we celebrate Labor Day?
      A: Labor Day honors the contributions of working men and women to America’s social and economic life. In 2007, Labor Day celebrations included a blend of picnics, parades and politics as well as the launch of a massive drive to fix our broken healthcare system.

      Q: When was Labor Day first celebrated in the United States?
      A: After the first Labor Day in New York City, celebrations began to spread to other states as workers fought to win workplace rights and better working conditions and wages at a time when they had little power.

      In 1893, New York City workers took an unpaid day off and marched around Union Square in support of a national Labor Day. The following year, 12,000 federal troops were called into Pullman, Ill., to break up a huge strike against the Pullman railway company and two workers were shot and killed by U.S. deputy marshals.

      In what most historians call an election-year attempt to appease workers after the federal crackdown on the Pullman strike, shortly after the strike was broken, President Grover Cleveland signed legislation making the first Monday in September Labor Day and a federal holiday. Cleveland lost the election.

      Q: When did Labor Day become a national holiday?
      A: After the first Labor Day in New York City, celebrations began to spread to other states as workers fought to win workplace rights and better working conditions and wages at a time when they had little power. In 1893, New York City workers took an unpaid day off and marched around Union Square in support of a national Labor Day. The following year, 12,000 federal troops were called into Pullman, Ill., to break up a huge strike against the Pullman railway company and two workers were shot and killed by U.S. deputy marshals. In what most historians call an election year attempt to appease workers after the federal crackdown on the Pullman strike, shortly after the strike was broken, President Grover Cleveland signed legislation making the first Monday in September Labor Day and a federal holiday. Cleveland lost the election.

      Q: Who founded Labor Day?
      A: That’s a matter of dispute among historians. Some say Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a co-founder of the American Federation of Labor, first suggested a day to honor workers. Others credit Matthew Maguire, a machinist who served as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York.

      Q: Is Labor Day just about unions?
      A: No. The U.S. Department of Labor describes Labor Day this way: “It is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country.”

      Q: What international holiday is Labor Day’s closet relative?
      A: May Day. In 1889, a workers’ congress in Paris voted to support the U.S. labor movement’s demand for an eight-hour workday. It chose May 1, 1890, as a day of demonstrations in favor of the eight-hour day. Afterward, May 1 became a holiday called Labor Day in many nations. It resembles the September holiday in the United States.

      Find Out More

      Celebrate working families and the union movement with
       games and  e-cards.
       

       

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.