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Yo ho ho, these pirates might kill ya'

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  • Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS
    Members and Friends, You may recall in the January - March Captain s Call the piece on Talk Like a Pirate Day, 19 September 2008. We have it on our council
    Message 1 of 4 , May 31, 2008
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      Members and Friends,
       
      You may recall in the January - March Captain's Call the piece on Talk Like a Pirate Day, 19 September 2008. We have it on our council calendar as a family event but no one to date has come forward to serve on the planning committee. It will be great fun if we can pull it off. Possibly we may move it forward to Monday, 8 September 2008, our fall luncheon.
       
      Though we can take time out to make light of pirates of old, piracy old or current is no laughing matter. It is a scourge of merchant shipping. There is now a documentary film on modern day pirate attacks, Porampo: Pirates of the Malacca Straits. Below are details on this film and the ambitious task of producing it.
       
      I have ordered the DVD and will see what can be done to get it shown in San Francisco or nearby. If you would like to assist, your help would be appreciated. I will attempt to schedule a showing of it at the NLUS National Convention as well.
       
      Phelps
       

      WHY DO MANY PIRATE ATTACKS GO UNREPORTED?

      http://www.porampo.com/story.html

      By day he's like any other Indonesian fisherman. But at night he becomes a modern Jolly Roger, boarding ships not with swords, but with grenades. Ask him and he'll tell you he's just a man taking care of his family. Ask a victim of his shotgun or long knife-if he's alive-and he's nothing but a dangerous criminal.

      Porampo: Pirates of the Malacca Straits, will take viewers on a journey inside the world of modern high seas piracy. This high def documentary focuses on one of the earth's traditionally dangerous waterways where a quarter of the world's ships pass every day. There, sailors may be assaulted by pirates who board with grappling hooks from fast vessels. These robbers seek a bounty of cash from the ship's safe, often victimizing crews at risk of being wounded, killed, or set adrift.

      According to the International Maritime Bureau, in 2007 there were 263 reported pirate attacks worldwide, up 10% from the year before. However, the actual number of crimes is likely much higher due to an alleged cover-up by certain unscrupulous shipping companies. It is believed that more than 50% of piracy is not reported, as some companies are desperate to avoid bad publicity and higher insurance premiums. Also,it may cost a vessel upwards of $25,000 USD per day in operational expenses to tie up a vessel during a piracy investigation.

      Two men, Michael Rawlins and Robert Duke, Jr., travel through Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia, in their quest for modern day pirates. Contacts are made in bamboo huts and money changes hands in taxis. An ex-pirate with the scars of grenades and knives tells his story. Along the way there are interviews with police, fishing villagers, and ship's crews. It all builds to the film's pinnacle: a real nighttime pirate raid in a fast boat through infrared light.

      ___________________________

      January 29, 2008

      Canamedia Productions of Toronto is developing "Pirate Hunters," a TV series based upon Porampo. Each episode will focus on harrowing stories of modern day pirate attacks. Go to Canamedia's web page, www.canamedia.com. Click on the "Yellow.TV" button. Next, look to the very lower left for "In Development." After that, click on "Pirate Hunters." Go to PIRATE HUNTERS now (then click on "In Development)."


      Yo ho ho, these pirates might kill ya’

      Filming modern-day terrorists of the seas - "Porampo: Pirates of the Malacca Straits"

      May 12, 2008 - 11:19AM
       

      Increasing awareness to ultimately bring about positive change takes someone who is willing to step up to the proverbial plate.

      Michael Rawlins, producer and director of "Porampo: Pirates of the Malacca Straits," decided to do just that by bringing to light the frequency, dangers and reality of modern day piracy.

      To much of Western society, pirates may seem like a thing of the past, chronicled in movies as a swashbuckling, good-looking, Johnny Depp-type figure. But these days a porampo (pirate in Indonesian) is more likely to wield an automatic weapon than a sword. And they don't have to rely on the wind to guide their sails, but make their getaway in high-powered speedboats.

      As a Merchant Marine officer for the last 15 years, hearing multiple reports of piracy was almost an everyday occurrence for Rawlins. In general, the Merchant Marines are civilian, but run government-contracted vessels, oil tankers and commercial freighters all over the world.  

      Rawlins decided to expose the nature and danger of modern day piracy after a crewmember suggested that he (or someone) should put together some sort of movie to let people know what is happening in some of the most important waters in terms of commercial trade.

      "I thought to myself, ‘Well, if not me, then who?'" Rawlins said. "It's been a ‘hot potato' issue for a long time that countries just don't want to deal with."

      A Carlinville native, Rawlins graduated from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville with a degree in broadcasting. He began his career as a broadcast journalist and is no stranger to the film industry. He left the world of broadcasting to travel the world after hearing about the Merchant Marines from a former classmate's father.

      Surprisingly, he said there are several people he knows of from Carlinville, a small town of about 5,700, who are in the Merchant Marines.

      "My father was in the Navy in World War II and I had always been intrigued by the sea," Rawlins said. "I started talking with a man who had a son in the Merchant Marine, and it sounded really interesting."
      Rawlins ended up at boot camp in Maryland, and three months later found himself on a ship.

      "At first I thought I would be in for two years, then five and now it's been 15," Rawlins said.

      Two years ago, he decided to begin work on the documentary, and the next thing he knew, he was organizing a crew and investigations were under way.

      The groundwork began with Rawlins; David M. Crabtree, producer, cinematographer and editor; and logistical coordinator Robert Duke, Jr. traveling through Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia. Rawlins said contacts were made in bamboo huts and money changed hands.

      "We interviewed ex-pirates, policemen, fishermen, villagers and ship's crewmen," Rawlins said.

      Without giving too much away, Rawlins said a group of pirates gave him and his film crew a taste of the real thing with a behind-the-scenes-look at what is a way of life in some parts of the world. The film crew used infrared light to capture the experiences on film.

      "We were warned that piracy is ruthless," Rawlins said. "A lot of people we tried to talk to would tell us they knew nothing about it - even though we knew they did."

      Many times they ran into dead ends and thought they were done as far as uncovering enough useable information for the documentary. But eventually, there were people who talked to them - some for a price.

      He said Duke has a natural knack for talking to people, and he really got down in the trenches and found a group that was willing to talk.

      Rawlins received a call from Duke who said, "It's on brother - NOW."

      Rawlins went to the parking lot and got into an SUV without the least idea of where he was going - or how safe it was.

      "I think more than being scared, at that point I was confused about what was going on," he said.  

      The film crew found themselves at an inlet where a boat of armed and masked men waited.

      "They told us to film them and then ‘Get out!'" Rawlins said. "They told us we would be going with them at night, too."

      That night a guide took Rawlins and his crew to a boat full of masked men; they boarded and took off into the ocean. Communication was through an interpreter, converting the pirates' Indonesian language to English.

      "Basically, it seems there are no pirate brethren," he said. "They're all independent, either as opportunists, regular people trying to feed their families or for political gain."

      Most do not think of themselves as criminals in the true sense of the word. Rawlins said they tend to rationalize what they are doing.

      "I think the idea of having their story told was appealing to them," Rawlins said. "Maybe it appealed to their ego. They just didn't want to get burned or exposed.

      "I was concerned about my crew and equipment, but I just didn't get that nervous for myself until I saw the footage with the infrared light. That looked a little scary."

      Through the filming, there was smoke, a lot of yelling and glowing eyes in a mask.

      "I wondered what we would do if the police came, and here we were filming armed pirates," he said. "But I tried to check all my emotions at the door and just get the job done that we were there to do."

      Rawlins has been to more than 40 different countries and traveled through some of the biggest piracy hotspots in the world as a Merchant Marine officer. He almost made it to Antarctica for the South Pole Run on a special ship commissioned for just that purpose. At the last minute plans changed.

      "Maybe someday I'll get there, too," he said. "But I have seen an awful lot of the Caribbean, South and North America, Africa, Europe and Asia, especially in the Far East run between Japan and Korea."

      Rawlins is also the author of "The Last American Sailors: A Wild Ride in the Modern Merchant Marine." He has written pieces for Professional Mariner Magazine and City Lights Publishing's "Instant City" series of short stories.

      Duke holds a U.S. Coast Guard license as Oceans Master. He has been a professional Merchant Mariner for more than 25 years. Crabtree has a degree from the University of Southern California School of Cinema-Television.

      The Malacca Strait is a about a 550-mile narrow stretch of water considered one of the most important shipping lanes in the world. It stretches between West Malaysia and the Indonesian island of Sumatra, serving as the main shipping channel between the Indian and Pacific oceans. More than 50,000 vessels pass through the strait every year carrying more than 25 percent of the world's trade goods including about one quarter of all oil.

      Other areas of reported pirate attacks in recent years include waters of the South China Sea, the Indian Ocean, the Caribbean, South America (Pacific and Atlantic) and West and East Africa.

      Some pirates are looking for easy profit, to help make ends meet, robbing ships and crews of money and other valuables. The groups may be made up of everyday citizens with everyday jobs who "moonlight" as pirates. Much of this type of piracy stems from poverty and poor economic conditions.

      Another kind of pirate is part of an organized group that may kidnap crews for ransom, and are looking for gain to further terrorism or other political motives. These pirates' operations have been compared to land-based organized crime syndicates.

      The high-definition documentary "Porampo: Pirates of the Malacca Straits" takes an inside look at this world of modern high seas piracy.

      Rawlins said pirates assault sailors and board vessels with grappling hooks. They often victimize crews who may, in the end, be wounded, killed or set adrift. In some cases, even luxury cruise liners have come under attack, including the 10,000-ton Seabourn Spirit carrying 302 people (guests and crew), attacked by Somalia pirates as it rounded the Horn of Africa in November 2005 (the pirates were prevented from boarding). In April, Le Ponant, a small French cruise ship carrying 30 crew members (no passengers) off the coast of Somalia was seized by pirates (who were later caught).

      According to the International Maritime Bureau, in 2003 there were 445 reported pirate attacks worldwide, with 21 sailors killed and 71 missing. But, Rawlins said, the actual number of crimes is likely much higher due to an alleged maritime industry-wide cover up. It is believed that less than 10 percent of piracy is reported because shipping companies are desperate to avoid bad publicity, higher insurance premiums and costly security personnel.

      Rawlins said officials at IMB say if the crimes aren't reported, they cannot be tracked.

      Rawlins developed Green Ray Films, LLC specifically for the porampo documentary, but the company has already been approached for more projects.  

      Toronto, Canada-based Canamedia Productions is working with Rawlins to develop a reality television series, "Pirate Hunters," taking the modern-day piracy exposure a step further, with plans to begin airing in January.

      "We're really excited about the television show, and it means we'll be doing more, finding out more, talking to more people," Rawlins said. "It will really help get the message out there."

      "Porampo: Pirates of the Malacca Straits" is available for purchase at www.porampo.com and www.amazon.com.


       
       
    • Phelps Hobart
      Fear Of Fighting http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htseamo/articles/20080923.aspx September
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 23, 2008
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        Fear Of Fighting

        http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htseamo/articles/20080923.aspx

        September 23, 2008: The piracy problem in the Gulf of Aden is attracting the attention of nations dependent on seaborne trade. That's because the Gulf of Aden is one the busiest shipping lanes in the world (with nearly ten percent of all traffic). Each month, 1500-1600 ships pass the northern coast of Somalia. So far this year, 3-4 of those ships have been seized by pirates each month. That's one ship out of every 400-500. But with the pirates getting more and more ransom money for each ship, the number of pirate groups operating in the Gulf of Aden is increasing. It's believed that at least three fishing trawlers (able to stay out for weeks at a time, and carry speed boats for attacks) are acting as mother ships for the pirates. Most merchant ships are wary of pirate operations, and put on extra lookouts, and often transit the 1,500 kilometer long Gulf of Aden at high speed (even though this costs them thousands of dollars in additional fuel). The pirates seek the slower moving, apparently unwary, ships, and go after them before they can speed up enough to get away. For the pirates, business is booming, and ransoms are going up. Pirates are now demanding $2-3 million per ship, and are liable to get it for the much larger tankers and bulk carriers they are now seizing.

        There is already an international naval protection effort; Task Force 150. At least fifteen warships, and two maritime patrol aircraft have set up a patrolled corridor through the Gulf of Aden, and advised slower ships to travel in convoys (which will get extra attention from the warships.) Ships are being warned to transit the Gulf of Aden carefully. It's the slow moving ships, without sufficient lookouts (the speedboats are difficult to spot with the radar used by merchant ships) that are most vulnerable. Meanwhile, the government in Puntland appears to be intimidated, and/or bought off, by the warlords running the pirate operations along their coast.

        The big problem is that no one wants to get involved with the Somalis on land. For centuries, the Somalis have had a reputation for being fearless and relentless fighters. Media advisors warn that fighting Somalis, who regularly use their own people as human shields, will expose the sailors to charges of war crimes, or, at the very least, bad publicity. Thus the prohibitions on firing on the pirates.

        For nearly two decades now, Somalia has had no central government. The country is a lawless land where the strong get their way and everyone else suffers. As a result, nations sending ships to participate in Task Force 150, are doing so with restrictive ROE (Rules Of Engagement). Some nations forbid their warships to fire, unless fired upon. Others will not permit their warships to engage in "hot pursuit" (chasing pirates back to mother ships or coastal refuges.) The only nations that have been aggressive towards the pirates has been the United States (which has fired on them several times), and the French (who have twice used commandos to rescue French citizens being held by the pirates. But neither of these nations is interested, yet, in raiding coastal bases of the pirates, or hunting down and destroying the mother ships. Not yet, anyway.

        ______________________________________

        Maritime Global Net - Sep 23 3:15 AM

        SOMALI-based are threatening to kill any European they capture unless France returns six suspected pirates captured by French commandos earlier this months when they freed two French nationals according to a Voice of America (VOA) report.
         

        Philippine Daily Inquirer - Sep 22 10:31 PM

        MANILA, Philippines -- The European Union, under the leadership of France, is preparing for naval action against pirates off Somalia who have been hijacking ships and crewmen for ransom, according to a transcript of an interview with French President Nicolas Sarkozy sent by the French Embassy.
         
        AP via Yahoo! News - Sep 22 12:01 AM
        Pirates in speedboats hijacked a Greek bulk carrier with 19 crew members off eastern Somalia, a piracy watchdog official said Monday.
         
        The Copenhagen Post - Sep 23 12:56 AM
        The Navy was jubilant when it announced the capture of 10 pirates off the coast of Somalia, but a week later there is still confusion about what to do with them.
         
        Voice of America - Sep 22 11:07 AM
        Somali pirates, who have been relentlessly attacking ships this year off the coast of Somalia, say they will kill any European they capture if France fails to release six pirates seized by French commandos earlier this month.
         
        Daily Dispatch - Sep 22 10:12 PM
        THE number of Filipino seamen being held by pirates around the Horn of Africa had risen to nearly 100 after the hijacking of a Greek merchant vessel, the Philippines government said yesterday.
         
        Manila Bulletin - Sep 22 10:59 AM
        The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) yesterday confirmed reports that another Greek-owned ship with 17 Filipino seamen on board was hijacked by Somali pirates near the coast of Somalia last Sunday, bringing to 97 the total number of Filipinos being held hostage in the northeast African country.
         
        AFP via Yahoo! Malaysia News - Sep 22 12:18 AM
        Somali pirates, who are now holding a record 13 ships hostage, are attacking further out to sea and on two fronts to evade international security, a maritime watchdog said Monday.
         
        GMA News - Sep 22 2:38 AM
        Norway"s new warship called Fridtjof Nansen will be deployed off the coast of Somalia to fight pirates operating in the area, according to Norwegian newspaper VG
         
        The Sun - Sep 22 2:32 AM
        Armed pirates have attacked and hijacked another Greek-owned cargo ship in the eastern coast of Somalia, taking all 19 crew members as hostage, an anti-piracy watchdog said today.
        ____________________________________


        --- In PMMC-NLUS@yahoogroups.com, "Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS" <pmmc@...> wrote:

      • Phelps Hobart
        News Stories for Pirates(Results 1 - 10 of about 20,302) Sort Results by: Relevance | Date
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 11, 2008
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          News Stories for Pirates

          (Results 1 - 10 of about 20,302)
          Sort Results by: Relevance | Date
          • 1.
            Somali pirates target tanker, UN food ship in new attacks
            AFP via Yahoo! News - 2 hours, 13 minutes ago
            Pirates seized a tanker and attacked a UN food ship that escaped, officials said Saturday, the latest in a series of incidents off Somalia which have sparked worldwide concern.
          • 2.
            Somali pirates target tanker, UN food ship in latest attacks
            AFP via Yahoo! News - Oct 11 10:28 AM
            Pirates seized a tanker and attacked a UN food ship that escaped, officials said Saturday, in the latest in a series of incidents off Somalia that have sparked concern among Western powers.
          • 3.
            2nd ship seized as pirates threaten to blow up 1st
            AP via Yahoo! News - Oct 11 6:54 AM
            Armed pirates hijacked a massive tanker as world powers on Saturday headed toward the Somali coast to end a two-week standoff aboard a ship laden with tanks and weapons, officials said.
          • 4.
            Pirates threaten to blow up arms-laden ship
            AP via Yahoo! News - Oct 11 3:55 AM
            With U.S. warships lurking nearby, the pirates who hijacked an arms-laden Ukrainian tanker off Somalia threatened to destroy the vessel unless a ransom is paid, a spokesman for the bandits said.
          • 5.
            New York Times - Oct 11 4:05 AM
            While the audacity of a band of Somali pirates who recently hijacked a ship has grabbed the world?s attention, the suffering of millions of Somalis seems to go unnoticed.
          • 6.
            Somali pirates hijack Greek tanker: piracy watchdog
            AFP via Yahoo! News - Oct 11 3:31 AM
            Somali pirates seized a Greek tanker and separately attacked a World Food Programme-chartered ship, a maritime piracy watchdog said Saturday.
          • 7.
            Fox News - 2 hours, 39 minutes ago
            Armed pirates in speedboats hijacked a Greek chemical tanker with 20 crew members in the Gulf of Aden near Somalia, a maritime official said.
          • 8.
            UPI - Oct 11 11:23 AM
            MOGADISHU, Somalia, Oct. 11 (UPI) -- Pirates who have seized a Ukrainian ship and its crew have threatened to blow up the ship, which is laden with weapons, if they are not paid $8 million.
          • 9.
            Los Angeles Times - Oct 11 8:57 AM
            Armed pirates hijacked a massive tanker as world powers today headed toward the Somali coast to end a two-week standoff aboard a ship laden with tanks and weapons, officials said.
          • 10.
            National Geographic - 2 hours, 21 minutes ago
            African pirates threatened Friday to blow up the arms-laden Ukrainian ship they've hijacked--the latest salvo in a crisis that's boosting shipping costs and cutting off aid to millions of Somalis.


          "The industry asks in the statement for three specific things: a commitment to increased numbers of deployed warships in the Gulf of Aden and to their coordinated action; the renewal of UN Security Council resolution 1816 for a longer time frame and to strengthen the text on actions required to repress piracy and an agreement to establish a legal jurisdiction to identify and punish criminals under due process."

          When high pressure fire hoses are insufficient, the display and use of twin 50 cal. machine guns fore and aft and a few automatics inbetween might do the trick. Skip the agreement.  

          Phelps

           

           
           
           
           

          Shipping Piracy Appeal at Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC)

          Tuesday, 07 October 2008

          THE major shipping industry organizations broke with normal protocol yesterday by using the start of this week's IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee meeting to make an impassioned plea for action to protect merchant ships from pirates in the Gulf of Aden.

          A statement was read out on behalf of BIMCO, Intercargo, The International Group, InterManager, Intertanko, IPTA, ITF, IUMI, OCIMF, SIGTTO and ICS.

          It says: "As organizations we are looking forward to a week of debate on the environmental performance of shipping and not least on the challenge of reducing carbon emissions from international shipping. But the dreadful problem of piracy in the Gulf of Aden is also at the forefront of our mind.

          "Mr Chairman, such is the state of lawlessness in the Gulf of Aden that attacks on innocent merchant ships are taking place every single day. Ships and their crews are being captured and held to ransom by organized armed criminal gangs seemingly able to operate with impunity."

          The industry bodies note that, in June of this year, the UN Security Council adopted resolution 1816 that allowed States cooperating with Somalia's Transitional Federal Government to enter the country's territorial waters and use all the necessary means to repress acts of piracy and armed robbery in a manner consistent with action permitted on the High Seas.

          The statement adds: "The Secretary-General has recognized the massive scale of this issue and we are grateful for his personal intervention which led directly to the adoption of this resolution. It is a fundamental principle of UNCLOS that the High Seas shall be used for peaceful purposes and furthermore that all States shall co-operate to the fullest extent possible in the repression of piracy on the High Seas ….. These are the principles that also now apply in Somalian waters."

          The appeal continues: "So far, in a response to resolution 1816, some states have deployed a limited number of warships to the region. Mr. Chairman, this is an enormous area of water through which passes a significant portion of the world's trade and an even more significant percentage of its oil supply – more than 10% of the world's traded oil. At any one moment around 300 ships are passing through the area serving the needs of the nations and peoples of the world; their right to the freedom of the High Seas for lawful purposes is under intolerable threat from organized criminals. The stress on the captured crews and on other seafarers who listen to their frantic, often unanswered, radio calls for assistance can scarcely be imagined."

          The shipping bodies are: "The fact that successful attacks are being carried out with ruthless determination, virtually every single day and that a dozen ships and more than 250 seafarers are being held captive, today, demonstrates without a shadow of doubt that insufficient resources are being applied to this shocking problem. We could not imagine that such complacency would apply if civil aircraft were the target of unlawful attacks."

          Implicitly referring to comments by senior naval figures the statement continues: "Calls for the industry to arm itself for protection are inappropriate, and only serve to deepen the sense of lawlessness and the abandonment of international legal principles in these waters."

          The industry asks in the statement for three specific things: a commitment to increased numbers of deployed warships in the Gulf of Aden and to their coordinated action; the renewal of UN Security Council resolution 1816 for a longer time frame and to strengthen the text on actions required to repress piracy and an agreement to establish a legal jurisdiction to identify and punish criminals under due process.


          United Nations Resolution 1816 (2008)
          Adopted by the Security Council at its 5902nd meeting on 2 June 2008

          The Security Council,
              Recalling its previous resolutions and the statements of its President concerning the situation in Somalia,
          Gravely concerned by the threat that acts of piracy and armed robbery against vessels pose to the prompt, safe and effective delivery of humanitarian aid to Somalia, the safety of commercial maritime routes and to international navigation,
              Expressing its concerns at the quarterly reports from the International Maritime Organization (IMO) since 2005, which provide evidence of continuing piracy and armed robbery in particular in the waters off the coast of Somalia,
          Affirming that international law, as reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 10 December 1982 ("the Convention"), sets out the legal framework applicable to combating piracy and armed robbery, as well as other ocean activities,
              Reaffirming the relevant provisions of international law with respect to the repression of piracy, including the Convention, and recalling that they provide guiding principles for cooperation to the fullest possible extent in the repression of piracy on the high seas or in any other place outside the jurisdiction of any state, including but not limited to boarding, searching, and seizing vessels engaged in or suspected of engaging in acts of piracy, and to apprehending persons engaged in such acts with a view to such persons being prosecuted,
              Reaffirming its respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia, Taking into account the crisis situation in Somalia, and the lack of capacity of the Transitional Federal Government (TFG) to interdict pirates or patrol and secure either the international sea lanes off the coast of Somalia or Somalia's territorial waters,
              Deploring the recent incidents of attacks upon and hijacking of vessels in the territorial waters and on the high seas off the coast of Somalia including attacks upon and hijackings of vessels operated by the World Food Program and numerous commercial vessels and the serious adverse impact of these attacks on the prompt, safe and effective delivery of food aid and other humanitarian assistance to the people of Somalia, and the grave dangers they pose to vessels, crews, passengers, and cargo,
              Noting the letters to the Secretary-General from the Secretary-General of the IMO dated 5 July 2007 and 18 September 2007 regarding the piracy problems off the coast of Somalia and the IMO Assembly resolution A.1002 (25), which strongly urged Governments to increase their efforts to prevent and repress, within the provisions of international law, acts of piracy and armed robbery against vessels irrespective of where such acts occur, and recalling the joint communiqué of the IMO and the World Food Programme of 10 July 2007,
              Taking note of the Secretary-General's letter of 9 November 2007 to the President of the Security Council reporting that the Transitional Federal Government of Somalia (TFG) needs and would welcome international assistance to address the problem,
              Taking further note of the letter from the Permanent Representative of the Somali Republic to the United Nations to the President of the Security Council dated 27 February 2008, conveying the consent of the TFG to the Security Council for urgent assistance in securing the territorial and international waters off the coast of Somalia for the safe conduct of shipping and navigation,    
              Determining that the incidents of piracy and armed robbery against vessels in the territorial waters of Somalia and the high seas off the coast of Somalia exacerbate the situation in Somalia, which continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security in the region,
              Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,
              1. Condemns and deplores all acts of piracy and armed robbery against vessels in territorial waters and the high seas off the coast of Somalia;
              2. Urges States whose naval vessels and military aircraft operate on the high seas and airspace off the coast of Somalia to be vigilant to acts of piracy and armed robbery and, in this context, encourages, in particular, States interested in the use of commercial maritime routes off the coast of Somalia, to increase and coordinate their efforts to deter acts of piracy and armed robbery at sea in cooperation with the TFG;
              3. Urges all States to cooperate with each other, with the IMO and, as appropriate, with the relevant regional organizations in connection with, and share information about, acts of piracy and armed robbery in the territorial waters and on the high seas off the coast of Somalia, and to render assistance to vessels threatened by or under attack by pirates or armed robbers, in accordance with relevant international law;
              4. Further urges States to work in cooperation with interested organizations, including the IMO, to ensure that vessels entitled to fly their flag receive appropriate guidance and training on avoidance, evasion, and defensive techniques and to avoid the area whenever possible;
              5. Calls upon States and interested organizations, including the IMO, to provide technical assistance to Somalia and nearby coastal States upon their request to enhance the capacity of these States to ensure coastal and maritime security, including combating piracy and armed robbery off the Somali and nearby coastlines;
              6. Affirms that the measures imposed by paragraph 5 of resolution 733 (1992) and further elaborated upon by paragraphs 1 and 2 of resolution 1425 (2002) do not apply to supplies of technical assistance to Somalia solely for the purposes set out in paragraph 5 above which have been exempted from those measures in accordance with the procedure set out in paragraphs 11 (b) and 12 of resolution 1772 (2007);
              7. Decides that for a period of six months from the date of this resolution, States cooperating with the TFG in the fight against piracy and armed robbery at sea off the coast of Somalia, for which advance notification has been provided by the TFG to the Secretary-General, may:
                  (a) Enter the territorial waters of Somalia for the purpose of repressing acts of piracy and armed robbery at sea, in a manner consistent with such action permitted on the high seas with respect to piracy under relevant international law; and
                  (b) Use, within the territorial waters of Somalia, in a manner consistent with action permitted on the high seas with respect to piracy under relevant international law, all necessary means to repress acts of piracy and armed robbery;
              8. Requests that cooperating states take appropriate steps to ensure that the activities they undertake pursuant to the authorization in paragraph 7 do not have the practical effect of denying or impairing the right of innocent passage to the ships of any third State;
              9. Affirms that the authorization provided in this resolution applies only with respect to the situation in Somalia and shall not affect the rights or obligations or responsibilities of member states under international law, including any rights or obligations under the Convention, with respect to any other situation, and underscores in particular that it shall not be considered as establishing customary international law, and affirms further that this authorization has been provided only following receipt of the letter from the Permanent Representative of the Somalia Republic to the United Nations to the President of the Security Council dated 27 February 2008 conveying the consent of the TFG;
              10. Calls upon States to coordinate their actions with other participating States taken pursuant to paragraphs 5 and 7 above;
              11. Calls upon all States, and in particular flag, port and coastal States, States of the nationality of victims and perpetrators or piracy and armed robbery, and other States with relevant jurisdiction under international law and national legislation, to cooperate in determining jurisdiction, and in the investigation and prosecution of persons responsible for acts of piracy and armed robbery off the coast of Somalia, consistent with applicable international law including international human rights law, and to render assistance by, among other actions, providing disposition and logistics assistance with respect to persons under their jurisdiction and control, such victims and witnesses and persons detained as a result of operations conducted under this resolution; S/RES/1816 (2008) 08-36177 4
              12. Requests States cooperating with the TFG to inform the Security Council within 3 months of the progress of actions undertaken in the exercise of the authority provided in paragraph 7 above;
              13. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the Security Council within 5 months of adoption of this resolution on the implementation of this resolution and on the situation with respect to piracy and armed robbery in territorial waters and the high seas off the coast of Somalia;
              14. Requests the Secretary-General of the IMO to brief the Council on the basis of cases brought to his attention by the agreement of all affected coastal states, and duly taking into account the existing bilateral and regional cooperative arrangements, on the situation with respect to piracy and armed robbery;
              15. Expresses its intention to review the situation and consider, as appropriate, renewing the authority provided in paragraph 7 above for additional periods upon the request of the TFG;
              16. Decides to remain seized of the matter.
        • Phelps Hobart
          [X-(] There are more than one post on the subject of Piracy. It again is in the news. Now it is on the front page of http://www.navyleague.org
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 1, 2008
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            X-(


            There are more than one post on the subject of Piracy. It again is in the news.  Now it is on the front page of http://www.navyleague.org .

            Check out these references including the November 2008 issue of Sea Power:

            http://www.navyleague.org/public_relations/Nov08/112108-NLUS-on-Piracy.php

            Navy League addresses piracy issue, its impact on maritime security

            "MDA (Maritime Domain Awareness) is also a major deterrent in the war on terror, piracy, drugs, smuggling, etc."

            -- Navy League's Maritime Policy Statement 2008-9 - Preserving Sea Power A National Imperative

            Nov. 21, 2008 - The serious nature of piracy on the high seas has been a topic of major concern that the Navy League has been addressing for several years. Well before the most recent media focus of this critical global maritime issue stemming from the ongoing increased and bolder pirate overtaking of ships and commercial super tankers by Somalian pirates in the Gulf of Aden, the Navy League has taken a strong position that this issue is one that greatly impacts our nation's maritime security and our freedom to navigate and trade along the open seas.

            Below are links to Navy League published documents and media interviews addressing the rising problem of piracy.

            SEAPOWER Articles

            "Piracy on the Rise" by Matt Hilburn, Nov 2008 (current issue pg 12 - electronic version)
            "Cops on the Beat" by Richard Burgess, Feb 2008
            "Piracy: Old Danger Becomes New Threat on the Open Seas" by David Munns,
            Oct. 2004 (cover story)

            SEAPOWER Editorials by Amy Wittman, Editor-in-Chief

            "Dangerous Waters" - Nov 2008 (current issue pg 12 - electronic version)
            "Turning Up the Heat" - Feb 2008

            Media Interviews - Nov. 7, 2005

            Stephen Pietropaoli, Navy League Executive Director
            CNBC video - CNBC Piracy Nov 7 2005CNN video - CNN Piracy Nov 7 2005 (there are a few seconds lead in)

            Yo ho ho, these pirates might kill ya'

            Phelps

            ______________________________________________

            --- In PMMC-NLUS@yahoogroups.com, "Phelps Hobart" <nlsac@...> wrote:

             News Stories for Pirates(Results 1 - 10 of about 20,302) Sort Results by: Relevance | Date

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