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Port of Oakland Maritime Air Quality Policy Statement

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  • Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS
    Bay Crossings Publisher Joel Williams took this photo of a large container ship at the Port of Oakland. The Oakland Board of Port Commissioners recently took a
    Message 1 of 2 , May 11, 2008
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      Bay Crossings Publisher Joel Williams took this photo of a large container ship at the Port of Oakland. The Oakland Board of Port Commissioners recently took a bold step to address community and environmental concerns about impacts on air quality from its maritime operations.
       

      The seven-member board voted unanimously to adopt and implement a "Maritime Air Quality Policy Statement" and "Early Actions" to reduce air pollutant emissions and related health risk. Ship and commercial watercraft engines pump more than 1.2 tons of fine particulate matter into Bay Area air every day, according to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

      Port of Oakland and Union Take Steps to Reduce Emissions 
      Bay Area dockworkers with the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) Local 10 responded last month to an alarming health risk assessment released by the California Air Resources Board and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.
       
       

      http://www.baycrossings.com/dispnews.asp?id=1992

      By Paul Duclos

      "We work and live in this community," said ILWU Local 10 President Melvin Mackay. "We breathe the same dirty air on the docks that West Oakland residents do on their streets. We’re very concerned about the cancer and asthma risks that this study found. The shipping industry needs to take more steps to reduce its pollution."

      The ILWU launched its Saving Lives campaign in January 2006 to encourage multinational ship-owning companies to reduce oceangoing vessel smokestack emissions by at least 20 percent by 2010 in port cities along the Pacific coast and nationwide. Ship and commercial watercraft engines pump more than 1.2 tons of fine particulate matter into Bay Area air every day, according to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, and oceangoing container vessels produce more sulfur dioxide—a major air pollutant associated with respiratory diseases—than all of the world’s cars, trucks and buses combined.

      The Oakland Board of Port Commissioners also took a bold step to address community and environmental concerns about impacts on air quality from its maritime operations. The seven-member board voted unanimously to adopt and implement a "Maritime Air Quality Policy Statement" and "Early Actions" to reduce air pollutant emissions and related health risk.

      The policy provides funding mechanisms, including container fees, to generate $520 million over several years for maritime air pollution reduction initiatives and infrastructure improvements. Setting a fee structure will allow the port to qualify for matching state funds for these significant and groundbreaking projects. The specific amount of any container fees will be determined after further staff work and analysis is completed on the best approach, as well as on the economic and business impacts of such fees. The Port Commissioner Board directed staff to convene a public forum in late spring to consider the full spectrum of issues related to requiring that truckers entering the port be employees of trucking companies. Staff was also directed by the Board to hire a consultant to prepare a detailed report regarding an employee/trucker requirement by June 2008.

      Even as the Port of Oakland cargo business grows, officials there say the port will dramatically cut air pollution. The risk reduction calculations will be determined using the Port’s 2005 seaport emissions inventory baseline.


       

      Press Releases

      For Immediate Release
      March 18, 2008
      Oakland Port Commissioners Unanimously Adopt Major Maritime Air Quality Policy
      Goal – By the year 2020 an 85% Health Risk Reduction from Oakland Seaport Diesel Particulate Matter; New Funding to Generate $520 Million for Modernization and Air Quality Programs

      Oakland, CA 03-18-08 – Today the Oakland Board of Port Commissioners took a bold step to address community and environmental concerns about impacts on air quality from its maritime operations. The seven-member board voted unanimously to adopt and implement a “Maritime Air Quality Policy Statement” and “Early Actions” to reduce air pollutant emissions and related health risk.

      The policy provides funding mechanisms, including container fees, to generate $520 million over several years for maritime air pollution reduction initiatives and infrastructure improvements. Setting a fee structure will allow the Port to qualify for matching state funds for these significant projects. The specific amount of any container fees will be determined after further staff work and analysis is completed on the best approach and the economic and business impacts of such fees. The Port Board directed staff to convene a public forum in late spring to consider the full spectrum of issues related to requiring that truckers entering the Port be employees of trucking companies. Staff was also directed by the Board to hire a consultant to prepare a detailed report regarding an employee/trucker requirement by June 2008.

      Jack Broadbent, Chief Executive Officer of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, spoke at the meeting in favor of the policy statement and the California Air Resources Board sent a letter of support. Port Board President Anthony Batarse stated, “This maritime air quality policy statement will lay the groundwork to reduce port pollution and support a healthy community. Air pollution comes from many sources in the Bay Area and we are committed to doing our part to reduce diesel pollution from Port-related activities.” The funding mechanisms will help truckers retrofit or replace older polluting trucks at the seaport. It will also fund ways of reducing ship idling emissions while the vessels are docked at the Port of Oakland.

      Even as the Port of Oakland cargo business grows, the Port will dramatically cut air pollution. The risk reduction calculations will be determined using the Port’s 2005 seaport emissions inventory baseline. Diesel exposure has been associated with cancer and other health risks.

      “We are working with our partners to achieve our goal that, by the year 2020, the Port of Oakland will have cut the health risk from diesel particulate matter at our seaport by 85%,” said Omar Benjamin, Executive Director of the Port of Oakland. “We share Oakland Mayor Ron Dellums’ vision for an Oakland with reduced environmental impacts, sustainable development and collaboration with the community to create more benefits for local residents,” added Benjamin.

      Port of Oakland
      The Port of Oakland oversees the Oakland seaport, Oakland International Airport and 20 miles of waterfront. The Oakland seaport is the third busiest containerport on the West Coast. Oakland International Airport offers more than 200 daily non-stop flights to 38 destinations; and the Port’s real estate includes commercial developments like Jack London Square, as well as more than 580 acres of public parks and conservation areas. The Port of Oakland was established in 1927 and is an independent department of the City of Oakland. Web site:
      www.portofoakland.com

      Media Contacts:

      Marilyn Sandifur
      Port Spokesperson
      (510) 627-1193
      msandifur@...

    • capt.ob@comcast.net
      The ship pictured on the magazine cover is the APL Philippines, a C-11 container ship. It was my last assignment before retiring from the Masters, Mates &
      Message 2 of 2 , May 11, 2008
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        The ship pictured on the magazine cover is the APL Philippines, a C-11 container ship. It was my last assignment before retiring from the Masters, Mates & Pilots Union in March  2007.......OBie
         
        -------------- Original message --------------
        From: "Pacific Merchant Marine Council, NLUS" <pmmc@...>

         
         
        Bay Crossings Publisher Joel Williams took this photo of a large container ship at the Port of Oakland... >
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