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Fw: New CNO Message to the Fleet and Sailing Directions attached

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  • Phelps Hobart
    Ahoy All, Please read the messages below and the attached Sailing Directions. The attached 27 SEP 11 CHINFO CLIPS.doc is optional but definitely informative.
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 27, 2011
    
    Ahoy All,
     
    Please read the messages below and the attached Sailing Directions. The attached 27 SEP 11 CHINFO CLIPS.doc is optional but definitely informative.
     
    Do you want to support the United States Navy of the future? How about your council? If yes, read on...
     
    The Pacific Central Region needs additional Navy Leaguers willing and able to give presentations to members of Congress when they are in their district offices and to community service organizations. If you are interested or you know of members within your council who might be interested please contact me. Monthly I submit reports on how we are doing in both categories - Legislative Affairs and Community Service Organization Presentations. Trust me, you don't want to see the reports submitted in the past - they don't reflect well on our region.
     
    Let's get out there and pass the word that the Navy needs the support of members of Congress and the nation's citizens.
     
    Standing by ready to assist and that includes the scheduling of appointments for training.
     
    Phelps
    Phelps Hobart
    Senior Vice President
    Vice President - Legislative Affairs
    Vice President - Community Service Organization Presentations
    Pacific Central Region
    Navy League of the United States
    (916) 739-6949
     
     

     
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Jim Bras
    To: Region Vice Presidents for Legislative Affairs
    Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2011 9:52 AM
    Subject: Fw: New CNO Message to the Fleet and Sailing Directions attached

    ----- Forwarded Message -----
    From: Lumme, Dale
    Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2011 8:20 AM
    Subject: New CNO Message to the Fleet and Sailing Directions attached

    Please see CNO Admiral Greenerts Sailing Directions, and the Assuption of Command NAVADMIN Message, CNO Message to the Fleet, and Personal For Flag Officers and SES Message:
    R 231526Z SEP 11
    FM CNO WASHINGTON DC//N00//
    TO NAVADMIN
    UNCLAS
    NAVADMIN 282/11
    MSGID/GENADMIN/CNO WASHINGTON DC/N00/SEP//

    SUBJ/CNO CHANGE OF COMMAND//

    RMKS/1. AT 1055L TODAY, ADMIRAL JONATHAN GREENERT RELIEVED ADMIRAL GARY ROUGHEAD AS THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS.

    2. ALL CURRENT ORDERS AND DIRECTIVES REMAIN IN EFFECT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

    3. RELEASED BY ADMIRAL GREENERT, CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS.//
     
    Ten minutes later:

    R 231536Z SEP 11
    FM CNO WASHINGTON DC//N00//
    TO NAVADMIN
    UNCLAS
    NAVADMIN 283/11
    MSGID/GENADMIN/CNO WASHINGTON DC/N00/SEP//

    SUBJ/CNO MESSAGE TO THE FLEET//

    RMKS/1. TODAY, I AM HONORED TO BECOME YOUR 30TH CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS. ADMIRAL ROUGHEAD TURNED OVER TO ME THE GREATEST NAVY IN THE WORLD.

    2. I AM THE SON OF A STEEL WORKER FROM BUTLER, PA. GROWING UP WITH FOUR SISTERS AND MY BROTHER, MY PARENTS TAUGHT ME AT AN EARLY AGE THE VALUE OF HARD WORK, PERSEVERANCE, AND INTEGRITY. THE OPPORTUNITIES THE NAVY GAVE ME OVER THESE PAST 36 YEARS PUT ME ON A JOURNEY FROM WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA TO SERVING AS CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS TODAY. I CONSIDER MYSELF AN EXAMPLE OF THE TREMENDOUS OPPORTUNITIES OUR NAVY AFFORDS EACH OF US EVERY DAY.

    3. MY THREE TENETS TO ADDRESS OUR CHALLENGES AND ORGANIZE, TRAIN, AND EQUIP THE NAVY, ARE PROVIDED HERE:

    A. WARFIGHTING FIRST: WARFIGHTING IS AT THE CORE OF OUR EXISTENCE. WE MUST MAINTAIN OUR ABILITY TO FIGHT AND WIN.

    B. OPERATE FORWARD: WE ARE MOST EFFECTIVE OPERATING FORWARD AROUND THE WORLD, ENSURING ACCESS TO THE MARITIME CROSSROADS TO ENSURE FREEDOM OF MANEUVER AND ECONOMIC PROSPERITY.

    C. BE READY: WE WILL BE READY. OUR SAILORS WILL BE TRAINED, OUR SUBMARINES, SHIPS, AND AIRCRAFT WILL BE MAINTAINED, AND OUR SHORE COMMANDS WILL BE ENABLED TO SUPPORT WHAT YOU NEED TO DO YOUR JOB. WE WILL BE JUDICIOUS WITH OUR RESOURCES, AND OUR SAILORS' AND CIVILIANS' TIME, WHILE PREPARING TO EXECUTE ASSIGNED MISSIONS.

    4. I AM HONORED TO BE YOUR CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS. DRAWING UPON OVER TWO CENTURIES OF HERITAGE AND TRADITION, I TRUST THAT, WHEN CALLED UPON, YOU WILL PERFORM SUPERBLY. YOU EXEMPLIFY THE HIGHEST STANDARDS OF SERVICE TO OUR NATION.

    5. RELEASED BY ADMIRAL GREENERT, CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS.//
     
    And another nine minutes later:
    Subject: PERSONAL FOR ALL FLAG OFFICERS, SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE
    Originator: CNO WASHINGTON DC(UC)
    DTG: 231545Z Sep 11
    ----------------------------
    UNCLASSIFIED/
    FM CNO WASHINGTON DC//N00//
    TO NAVADMIN

    UNCLAS PERSONAL FOR ALL FLAG OFFICERS, SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE, COMMANDERS, COMMANDING OFFICERS, AND OFFICERS-IN-CHARGE FROM ADMIRAL GREENERT//N05400//
    NAVADMIN 284/11
    MSGID/GENADMIN/CNO WASHINGTON DC/N00/SEP//
    SUBJ/ASSUMPTION OF COMMAND//
     
    RMKS/1. TODAY, I RELIEVED ADMIRAL GARY ROUGHEAD AS CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS. ADMIRAL ROUGHEAD HAS STOOD AT THE HELM OF OUR GREAT NAVY FOR FOUR CHALLENGING YEARS. UNDER HIS STEADFAST LEADERSHIP, THE U.S. NAVY HAS EXCELLED IN MAJOR COMBAT OPERATIONS IN THE MIDDLE EAST, SOUTHWEST ASIA, AND NORTH AFRICA. HE HAS LED AND ENABLED OUR NAVY TO TAKE THE FIGHT AGAINST EXTREMISTS FORWARD, AWAY FROM OUR SHORES, AND DETER OUR ENEMIES FROM ATTACKING OUR HOMELAND. AT THE SAME TIME, HE BALANCED OUR EFFORTS IN SUPPORTING TWO WARS WITH NUMEROUS HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE AND DISASTER RELIEF OPERATIONS ACROSS THE GLOBE IN ORDER TO ASSIST OUR PARTNERS AND ALLIES IN THEIR TIME OF NEED. THROUGH HIS SAGE WISDOM, VISION, AND GUIDANCE, OUR NAVY HAS GROWN IN CAPABILITY AND EXPANDED GLOBAL MARITIME PARTNERSHIP. WE ARE ON A GOOD COURSE TO MEET THE CHALLENGES LOOMING ON THE HORIZON. I SALUTE ADMIRAL ROUGHEAD AND HIS WIFE ELLEN FOR THEIR STEADFAST DEVOTION AND SELFLESS SERVICE TO OUR NAVY AND OUR NAVY FAMILIES FOR THE LAST 38 YEARS.
     
    2. I AM HONORED TO BE AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO LEAD THE WORLD'S MOST CAPABLE NAVY AT A CROSSROADS IN OUR NATION'S HISTORY. AS OUR COUNTRY ADJUSTS TO A NEW STRATEGIC PARADIGM IN THE COMING YEARS, WE WILL ADAPT TO CHANGE AND DEFEND NATIONAL SECURITY INTERESTS WITH THE SAME SPIRIT AND WARRIOR ETHOS THAT HAVE BEEN EMBEDDED WITHIN THE VERY FABRIC OF OUR CULTURE AND HERITAGE SINCE OUR FOUNDING.
    3. OUR NAVY'S ABILITY TO DEFEND NATIONAL INTERESTS HAS ALWAYS DEPENDED ON THE INITIATIVE AND RESOURCEFULNESS OF OUR COMMANDING OFFICERS. COMMAND IS ONE OF THE CORNERSTONES OF THE VERY FOUNDATION UPON WHICH OUR NAVY RESTS. YOU HAVE BEEN ENTRUSTED WITH THE "CHARGE OF COMMAND." YOU WERE SELECTED FOR COMMAND BY SENIOR OFFICERS WHO JUDGED YOU WORTHY, READY AND THE BEST QUALIFIED TO LEAD SAILORS, AND THEY DID SO BASED UPON SUSTAINED SUPERIOR PERFORMANCE OVER THE COURSE OF YOUR RESPECTIVE CAREERS. TO WHOM MUCH IS GIVEN, MUCH IS EXPECTED. I EXPECT COMMANDING OFFICERS AT ALL LEVELS TO BE FULLY FLUENT IN THE THREE ESSENTIAL PRINCIPLES OF COMMAND - AUTHORITY, RESPONSIBILITY, AND ACCOUNTABILITY. YOU HAVE BEEN PROVIDED WITH THE AUTHORITY COMMENSURATE WITH YOUR RESPONSIBILITY - EXERCISE YOUR AUTHORITY WISELY. WITH RESPONSIBILITY COMES ACCOUNTABILITY. I EXPECT THAT YOU WILL MAINTAIN THE HIGH STANDARDS REQUIRED OF COMMANDING OFFICERS, AND HOLD THE MEMBERS OF YOUR COMMAND TO THE SAME HIGH STANDARDS THAT I HOLD YOU. ACCOUNTABILITY IS BASED ON TRUST. I TRUST IN YOU; YOU MUST BUILD THIS SAME TRUST WITH THE PEOPLE IN YOUR COMMAND. BUILD THIS TRUST THROUGH YOUR PERSONAL INTERACTIONS AND DEMONSTRATE YOUR CHARACTER THROUGH PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE, GOOD JUDGMENT, FAIRNESS, COMMON SENSE, AND RESPECT, BOTH UP AND DOWN THE CHAIN OF COMMAND. WHEN THIS TRUST AND ACCOUNTABILITY ARE INSTITUTIONALIZED IN THE ROUTINE OF COMMAND, THE RESULT IS OUR COLLECTIVE LONG TERM SUCCESS. FOSTERING A CLIMATE OF TRUST AND ACCOUNTABILITY IS YOUR DUTY AS COMMANDING OFFICERS IN THE UNITED STATES NAVY. DO NOT LET ME DOWN.
    4. WE WILL USE THREE MAIN TENETS TO ACHIEVE OUR VISION. THE FIRST TENET, "WARFIGHTING FIRST," MUST BE AT THE VERY CORE OF OUR EXISTENCE. ALL OF OUR EFFORTS TO IMPROVE CAPABILITIES, DEVELOP PEOPLE, AND STRUCTURE OUR ORGANIZATIONS SHOULD BE GROUNDED IN THIS FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLE. WHEN CALLED UPON, NAVY AND OUR CLOSEST JOINT PARTNER, THE U.S. MARINE CORPS, WILL DELIVER CREDIBLE COMBAT CAPABILITY TO ASSURE ACCESS, SEA CONTROL, AND POWER PROJECTION IN ORDER TO FIGHT AND WIN OUR NATION'S WARS.
    5. OUR SECOND TENET IS "OPERATE FORWARD." OPERATING FORWARD IN THE GLOBAL MARITIME CROSSROADS, THE NAVY PROVIDES THE NATION AND OUR NATIONAL LEADERSHIP WITH OFFSHORE OPTIONS IN ORDER TO DETER, INFLUENCE AND PREVAIL IN ANY CONFLICT WE ENCOUNTER IN TODAY'S UNCERTAIN ENVIRONMENT. OUR FORWARD DEPLOYED POSTURE WILL BE READY AND PERSISTENT, USING A COMBINATION OF ROTATIONAL DEPLOYMENTS, FORWARD BASES, AND COOPERATIVE SECURITY LOCATIONS. OUR FORWARD PRESENCE WILL BUILD ON AND STRENGTHEN OUR PARTNERSHIPS AND ALLIANCES WHERE SEA LANES, RESOURCES, AND VITAL U.S. INTERESTS INTERSECT.
    6. OUR THIRD TENET IS "BE READY" TO FACE ANY CHALLENGE. THE IMPORTANCE OF UNIT READINESS (MATERIEL INTEGRITY AND OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY) IS EMBEDDED AND INCULCATED IN EVERY SAILOR EARLY IN THEIR TRAINING. HOWEVER, WE CANNOT BE A WHOLE NAVY WITHOUT A MOTIVATED, RELEVANT, AND DIVERSE TEAM OF SAILORS, CIVILIANS, AND FAMILIES. THIS LEVEL OF READINESS REQUIRES THAT EACH AND EVERY SAILOR BE PHYSICALLY, MEDICALLY, PSYCHOLOGICALLY, SPIRITUALLY, AND ADMINISTRATIVELY READY TO DEPLOY WORLDWIDE. IN ADDITION TO OUR SAILORS AND CIVILIANS, WE HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO OUR NAVY FAMILIES, WHO WE MUST GUIDE AND ASSIST IN HANDLING INCREASINGLY DYNAMIC SCHEDULES, MOUNTING OPERATIONAL STRESS, LONGER SEPARATIONS AND THE POTENTIAL INJURY OR LOSS OF THEIR SAILOR. ACCORDINGLY, FAMILY READINESS IS ALSO A PART OF "BEING READY." WHILE WE HONE OUR INDIVIDUAL, UNIT, AND FAMILY READINESS, WE HAVE TO DEAL WITH DIMINISHING RESOURCES. WE MUST ADOPT AND EMBRACE A CULTURE OF FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY AND JUDICIOUSNESS. WE MUST BE READY AND WILLING TO MAKE ANALYTICALLY SOUND, HARD CHOICES IN THE MONTHS AND YEARS AHEAD. FURTHER, WE MUST ALSO LOOK FOR INNOVATIVE WAYS OF MAINTAINING OUR FORWARD DEPLOYED AND READY POSTURE, WHILE SEEKING EFFICIENCIES AND REDUCING COSTS WHEN WE CAN.
    7. I ENTER THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS FULLY AWARE THAT WE HAVE DAUNTING CHALLENGES TODAY AND IN THE FUTURE. I ALSO HAVE A GREAT SENSE OF PRIDE IN YOU AND AM CONFIDENT ABOUT THE FUTURE. OUR RESPONSIBILITY IS TO PROVIDE A NAVY THAT IS READY TO EXECUTE TODAY'S MISSION TODAY, AND TO MEET TOMORROW'S CHALLENGES. I AM CONFIDENT YOU WILL CONTINUE TO RISE TO THE OCCASION - AS YOUR PREDECESSORS HAVE DONE SINCE OUR NATION'S FOUNDING - AND LEAD OUR SAILORS TO SUCCESS!
    8. GREENERT SENDS.//
     
     



    ----- Forwarded Message -----
    From: Patricia Du Mont

    To: Region Vice Presidents for Legislative Affairs

    Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:59 AM
    Subject: Fwd: advance copy - Navy Times: NEW CNO's Tough Course


    Sent from my iPhone

    Begin forwarded message:
    From:
    FYI
    Greenert's Tough Course
    CNO set to weather budget cuts, restore command dignity
    By Sam Fellman
    By all accounts, the Navy’s newest boss is a skilled operator from the Pentagon to the Pacific -- and is very personable, too. But don’t expect the honeymoon to last long.
    Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jon Greenert, like the other service chiefs, will come under pressure from Day One to find billions in cuts, fast. Many vexing choices will fall to Greenert: cutting midcareer sailors versus new accessions; ship maintenance versus research and development for the latest destroyer class; frequent deployments versus longer ones.
    Meanwhile, Greenert, who took the top job from retired Adm. Gary Roughead on Sept. 23, must contend with significant issues in the behavior of commanding officers. This year, with 18 CO firings, has already seen the second-highest number of firings since 2000.
    Defense analysts worry that the size and scope of the cuts, now reaching into the hundreds of billions of dollars over a decade, could “hollow” the force, leaving it bereft of the most capable combatants and airplanes, -- and the talented people to crew them.
    Greenert acknowledged as much when he testified to Congress on July 28, saying “the overarching challenge remains balancing priorities in a fiscally constrained environment.”
    Many defense experts and retired Navy leaders believe Greenert is the most capable choice. They point to his considerable Beltway experience, including time as the head of the Navy Programming Branch. But the tough choices are coming fast, they warn.
    “He’s going to be under extreme pressure to cut costs now and to cut people and maintenance to buy the future,” said retired Vice Adm. Peter Daly, chief executive officer of the U.S. Naval Institute. “But our young sailors and our platforms today are our future because the ships we have today will be the lion’s share of the structure that we have in 10 years. And the skilled people of tomorrow are the apprentices today.”
    He added, “That’s going to be a very tough trade-off.”
    Personnel issues
    The Navy plans to draw down to 319,000 sailors by 2015, 8,000 fewer than today. But that figure is still a working number.
    The short-term problem is that cutting end strength while maintaining the pace of operations puts stress on the smaller Navy that emerges from the cuts.
    However, Roughead, in a Sept. 15 interview with Navy Times, signaled that sailors can expect longer deployments next year due to the requirement of having two carriers in 5th Fleet for nine months out of the year.
    “As long as the operational tempo stays where it’s at today, then you’ve got to think about sailors and their families that are out there on the tip of the spear, redeploying or making longer deployments than we have in the past,” said retired Fleet Master Chief (SS/SW/AW/PJ) Mike McCalip, whose last job was as top enlisted man for the chief of naval personnel. “You’ve really got to think about that as the force gets smaller.”
    A rapid pace of operations doesn’t necessarily cause more sailors to leave the force, said Henry Griffis, a labor economist with the Center for Naval Analyses in Alexandria, Va., who has studied the Navy’s retention.
    “We’ve consistently found that there’s modest effects of high [personnel] tempo on retention,” said Griffis, who has served as CNA’s scientific analyst to the deputy chief of naval operations for operations, manpower, personnel, training and education.
    In fact, when op tempo is high, such as during the 2003 Iraq invasion, sailors are doing what they signed up to do, Griffis said. “People might be having a higher [personnel] tempo, but they’re also responding to the call,” he said.
    Uncertainty is a larger concern. In the sub force, for instance, many sailors have said they prefer the ballistic-missile submarine community, with its set deployment schedule, to the more erratic schedule of attack subs, said David Rodney, a research team leader for fleet and operational manpower with CNA.
    “When you talk about quality of life, I think if there’s a stress, it would stress the predictability of it,” Rodney said, referring to deployments. “It’s being able to plan your life.”
    Another enlisted retention board, which is a possibility for 2012, will be another stressor. This year’s board considered E-4s through E-8s in 31 overmanned ratings for separation. Officers will face sharper cuts soon, if Navy officials get their way. Those with 15 to 20 years could be selected for early retirement. The Navy is also seeking selective early retirement authority through 2018.
    If the Navy’s request is approved by Congress, the board would screen commanders who’ve been passed over once, as well as captains with two years or more in grade. Mandatory retirement age for commanders and captains would drop by three years, to 25 and 27 years of service, respectively.
    Officials also are lining up sweeteners such as separation pay and voluntary retirement incentives to entice sailors to leave service.
    The longer-term challenge, McCalip said, will be balancing personnel cuts across the force. For instance, simply reducing annual accessions would save money but would undermine future manning.
    “You’ve got to do a balance between those who are serving today and those who will serve in the future,” he said. “The CNP and the CNO’s challenge is balancing those actions so you get the right knowledge, skills and experience to the right places on the waterfront.”
    Culture
    This year’s tally of firings is second only to 2003, which saw 26 COs shown the door. Of the 18 fired so far this year, 11 cases have stemmed from misconduct. The CO of the carrier Enterprise was fired for making lewd videos when he was the ship’s executive officer. Two COs have been fired following drunken-driving charges. Another was sacked for fostering favoritism and a hostile climate on the amphibious transport dock she commanded.
    In some quarters, there is worry that respect for COs may be dropping. In June, Roughead issued a memo, titled “Charge of Command,” imploring all prospective commanding officers to live up to the highest expectations of conduct. Greenert, then the vice CNO, ordered the instruction to be read and signed by all COs and admirals.
    Restoring the professional ethos of the officer corps is going to be the biggest challenge for the next CNO, said retired Capt. Jan van Tol, a three-time ship CO who is a defense expert at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments in Washington, D.C. He argues that the privilege of command has become devalued, and officers have become too worried about taking risks.
    “We have become extremely risk-averse as a Navy officer corps. One tends to be rewarded for avoiding error rather than accomplishing something positive,” van Tol wrote in an email to Navy Times. He said this stems from the culture of fitness reports, arguing they are too often padded to maximize an officer’s board chances instead of serving as an accurate evaluation of their performance.
    “What is flawed is that reporting seniors are often reluctant to be completely frank in fitreps or that seniors who come to hear of things that aren’t quite right turn a blind eye,” van Tol wrote, adding that abusive command climates are usually no secret.
    The rise in firings is not necessarily a negative thing, said Daly, who was the No. 2 at Fleet Forces Command until earlier this year. “These firings are absolutely essential,” he said. “If we have substantiated substandard performance or unsatisfactory performance, they have got to go.”
    Readiness
    The Navy Greenert is taking over is stressed after years of doing more with less. Frequent, extended and unpredictable deployments continue to tax sailors and their families. Maintenance backlogs for aircraft are growing as demand for naval aviation remains high. The situation is particularly stark in the surface fleet, which is still recuperating after a decade of manning and funding cuts. As of July, two ships had failed their major material inspection in 2011, matching the previous year’s total.
    “The Navy has been aggressively tackling causal factors related to increases in [Board of Inspection and Survey] inspections that have resulted in ‘degraded’ or ‘unsatisfactory’ findings,” Greenert wrote in remarks submitted to the Senate Armed Service Committee on July 28. “A major contributor to these problems has been our high operational tempo to support ongoing conflicts over the past decade. Frequent deployments, compounded by a decreasing fleet size, have con­strained our ability to adhere to preplanned maintenance schedules.”
    Greenert listed some of the remedies the surface Navy has launched -- adding billets afloat and ship assistance teams -- which came from a fleet review panel that called for changes across the board. But the timing for a fleet rejuvenation couldn’t be worse, defense analysts warn, because of the scale of the defense cuts on the table.
    “It’s that recovery that’s very fragile,” Daly said, referring to initiatives to bolster ship readiness. “And under the topline, cuts that are being contemplated, that’s something the Navy will have to work very hard to protect.”
    On the operational side, these same defense cuts will force a lot of unsavory choices on Greenert and other service chiefs about what doesn’t get enough funding.
    “Where does he want to assume risk?” asked retired Cmdr. Rick Nelson, a defense expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. “Does he want to assume risk on the piracy missions, on the irregular warfare missions? Or does he want to assume risk on the high-end nation-state confrontations?
    “That can be very challenging because it’s one of those things,” Nelson added. “If you assume the risk and then you have a catastrophic incident in that risk area, then you end up being blamed and criticized.”
    Acquisitions
    Greenert’s leadership will be critical to the development of the Navy’s next-generation platforms such the Ohio-class sub replacement, the Navy version of the joint strike fighter, and the Zumwalt-class destroyer.
    The administration’s goal to cut at least $400 billion from the defense budget over the next decade is putting sacred cows on the table, such as the rate at which the Navy builds carriers or even the number of flattops. Greenert will also lead the Navy through a critical time for the littoral combat ship, which has become a lightning rod for critics after years of cost growth and schedule slippage. Mission modules for these ships are still in development. On Greenert’s watch, the LCS is expected to be forward-deployed to the western Pacific.
    Daly characterized much of the criticism as overblown, saying that early design issues were expected. The key, he said, is going to be solving them. And this platform raises a host of issues.
    “You’ve got that sea frame, you’ve got the modules -- there’s more moving pieces here in regards to training and equipping these ships than other ships,” Daly said. “We’re not where we need to be yet, but we’re gaining on that.” In aviation, one of the largest questions the Navy faces is how many JSFs to buy.
    “The Navy’s invested and committed to it, but it’s not going to be without perturbations and it’s not going to be without delays,” Nelson, a former Navy helicopter pilot, said of the F-35C Lightning II, which he described as a “remarkable aircraft.”
    In the meantime, F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets will remain the “workhorses of the fleet,” he said. An issue that should be getting more attention is surveillance using unmanned aerial vehicles, Nelson said. The Air Force has “integrated UAVs into their... operations, and the Navy hasn’t gotten there yet.”
    Nelson said the Navy needs to hurry up. He pointed out that Navy warships, subs and carriers are ideal platforms for launching small surveillance drones, both aerial and seagoing, to monitor other countries.
    “The Navy should be the leaders for nonintrusive [intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance],” he said.
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