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Re: World Mill

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  • A.
    Following up on what Sarah said.... ... which can be viewed as turning of the sky and rotation of the heavens around the pole star and grinding motion which
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2006
      Following up on what Sarah said....

      --- In PIEreligion@yahoogroups.com, "bhmsympatico" <bhm@...> wrote:
      >
      > Just some quick points to fuel thoughts on the World Mill. In my
      > opinion, there appears to be three sacred material arts employed by
      > the gods to form the world and that are necessary to its existence.
      > The first is the World Mill which manifests as an axis mundi and
      > producer of soma. The characteristics of this art is a rotation
      which can be viewed as turning of the sky and rotation of the heavens
      around the pole star and grinding motion which produces soma. The
      axis mundi function can be equated with grain grinding and brewing
      and processes raw materials for the benefit of the world. The
      process provides, as previously stated, "his land with peace and
      plenty."
      >

      Agreed fully! I just wish I could find more IE correlates to the tale!


      > The second material art is spinning. In a Slavic folktale (sorry I
      > don't have the source at hand to give you a name), a hag spins the
      > threads of discontent while a maiden spins the threads of
      happiness.
      > Spinning appears in a number of incidents with the gods. It
      > corresponds to the World Mill in that it is a material art that
      > processes raw materials into a product benefiting the world, it can
      > bring happiness or discontent, the process pulverizes plant
      material, and it involves a turning action.

      As to spinning --- yes, I think you are definitely on to something.
      If one envisions a spindle, (the spinning wheel is a post Christian
      development in Europe) the vertical pointed shaft equates to the axis
      mundi while the horizontal wheel aspect could be the heavens (or
      earth) turning around the axis.

      Regards,
      Aydan
    • Asvard Hrafn Istvansson
      You may find the book Hamlets Mill interesting it is the authors investiagtion into the various related mill wheel stories. He goes into the many cognate
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2006
        You may find the book Hamlets Mill interesting it is
        the authors investiagtion into the various related
        mill wheel stories.
        He goes into the many cognate stories, I am afraid
        however I cant remeber the authors name

        Asvard

        --- "A." <xthanex@...> wrote:


        ---------------------------------
        Following up on what Sarah said....

        --- In PIEreligion@yahoogroups.com, "bhmsympatico"
        <bhm@...> wrote:
        >
        > Just some quick points to fuel thoughts on the World
        Mill. In my
        > opinion, there appears to be three sacred material
        arts employed by
        > the gods to form the world and that are necessary to
        its existence.
        > The first is the World Mill which manifests as an
        axis mundi and
        > producer of soma. The characteristics of this art
        is a rotation
        which can be viewed as turning of the sky and rotation
        of the heavens
        around the pole star and grinding motion which
        produces soma. The
        axis mundi function can be equated with grain grinding
        and brewing
        and processes raw materials for the benefit of the
        world. The
        process provides, as previously stated, "his land with
        peace and
        plenty."
        >

        Agreed fully! I just wish I could find more IE
        correlates to the tale!


        > The second material art is spinning. In a Slavic
        folktale (sorry I
        > don't have the source at hand to give you a name), a
        hag spins the
        > threads of discontent while a maiden spins the
        threads of
        happiness.
        > Spinning appears in a number of incidents with the
        gods. It
        > corresponds to the World Mill in that it is a
        material art that
        > processes raw materials into a product benefiting
        the world, it can
        > bring happiness or discontent, the process
        pulverizes plant
        material, and it involves a turning action.

        As to spinning --- yes, I think you are definitely on
        to something.
        If one envisions a spindle, (the spinning wheel is a
        post Christian
        development in Europe) the vertical pointed shaft
        equates to the axis
        mundi while the horizontal wheel aspect could be the
        heavens (or
        earth) turning around the axis.

        Regards,
        Aydan





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      • William P. Reaves
        Hej , Hamlet s Mill by Giorgio de Santilliana and Bertha von Duchend. Wassail, W. Author of: Viktor Rydberg s Investigations into Germanic Mythology, Vol. II,
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 2, 2006
          Hej ,

          Hamlet's Mill by Giorgio de Santilliana and Bertha von Duchend.


          Wassail, W.


          Author of:

          Viktor Rydberg's Investigations into Germanic Mythology, Vol. II, Part I: Indo-European Mythology
          Translated and Annotated by William P. Reaves
          Forthcoming (Fall 2006)

          Viktor Rydberg's Investigations into Germanic Mythology, Vol. II, Part 2: Germanic Mythology
          Translated and Annotated by William P. Reaves (iUniverse, 2004)

          Our Fathers' Godsaga by Viktor Rydberg, Illustrated by John Bauer
          Translated by William P. Reaves (iUniverse 2003)

          Available whereever books are sold.



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