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Re: [OT] Munchkinbait

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  • notyetmousse24@aol.com
    frugal sez... A 20th level character according to the core rules should have about 760,000 gp worth of kit for a starting character, an established character
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 20, 2004
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      frugal sez...

      'A 20th level character according to the core rules should have about 760,000
      gp worth of kit for a starting character, an established character will have
      more like 1,000,000gp.'

      The gold values aren't the point. In my own campaign there's a character
      who's likely worth more than the entirety of creatures set against the group (in
      short he swiped a wand depot), but he's *still* the weakest character.

      'That buys a lot of stat boosters, necklaces of adaptation, cloaks of
      resistence etc...'

      Which can all be taken away, comparatively at whim, without permanent harm
      done. The feat can easily unbalance a game where treasure (income) is a bit
      more scarce.

      While such a feat obviously can't apply equally to all campaigns, and
      therefore should be set to a certain baseline, this feat gives away many strong
      unalienable powers which can't be revoked without major damage to either character
      or campaign.

      'I tried to play a monk with no possessions and by 8th level I had to give in
      and become a money grabbing imperialist like everyone else because the
      character was being beaten unconsious in every fight, all because he could not have
      any enchancements other than the ones cast on him by the party cleric.'

      Assuming 3e here, if I'm wrong I apologize in advance.

      How could you be getting whumped on as a monk? With base saves at 6, AC of
      at least 15 (why be a monk without high dex and wis?), and doing the damage of
      a great club (with up to 3 attacks a round), how could you possibly be so
      weak? If nothing else you could trip your opponents and limit them to a single
      attack per round.

      'Remember in D&D heroes are not made, they are bought.'

      This would explain why cohorts are generally useless, but I prefer to think
      that they're simply not the main characters.

      NotMousse
      TM Tamarin, QA Lemur

      I mean, if I can't even get a discount out of someone else's misfortune,
      what's the point?
      -MisterTambo, founding member of the League of Unemployed Gentlemen


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