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Soviet PBN-1 Ops in the Baltic

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  • Louis Dorny
    ... I am pleased that Jean-Christophe thinks my Russian is good enough. In fact, it s pretty rusty, but I have used it for WWII stuff in the Baltic Sea area.
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 4, 2013
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      I am pleased that Jean-Christophe thinks my Russian is good enough. In fact, it's pretty rusty, but I have used it for WWII stuff in the Baltic Sea area.

      Here is the one paragraph pertaining to the Baltic Sea area in the article and my attempt to convert it into plain English:
       
      The air force of the Baltic fleet first "Catalina" appeared in August 1944. It was one of the cars that arrived on the North. By 31 October in the 29 th separate air squadron of anti-submarine warfare had been six PBN- 1. American flying boats revealed in all respects superior to the other aircraft aviation CBF , applied for TPS. However, the rapid change of the situation in the theater , the refusal of the German command using submarines in the northern part of the Baltic Sea is not possible to take full advantage of the new aircraft . However , the high flying qualities " Catalina " have been used to solve problems of search and rescue services . Having a large range , american cars operated over areas of Central Baltic to Riga airport . One documented case of rescue Soviet pilots from the downed aircraft. 22 April 1945 12 torpedo topmachtovikov "Boston" 1st Guards and 51 th torpedo air regiments flew to attack enemy transport in the Baltic Sea. Ship's anti-aircraft artillery fire, four of them were shot down . The crew of one of them was specifically picked up by rescue aircraft PBN- 1.
       
      The Catalina first appeared in the Baltic Fleet area in August 1944. It was one of the planes (Russian, like German, uses a non-specific noun for 'aircraft,' like 'machine' - which can also be translated as 'cars') moved from the Northern Fleet area. By 31 October the 29th Separate ASW Squadron had six PBN-1s. The American planes were in all respects superior to the other aircraft in the  “CBF” (Northern Baltic Fleet area). (“TPS” meaning unknown). The rapid changes in the theater (the German eastern Front was collapsing and the Baltic coast from Kronstadt to Riga was quickly lost to the Soviets) and the few German submarines patrolling the Northern Baltic meant that the Catalina’s ASW capability could not be used. One documented case of ASR occurred on 22 April 1945. Twelve Bostons (The Soviet Navy used the Douglas Boston as a torpedo bomber) of the 1st Guards and 51st Torpedo Air Regiments attacked enemy transports in the Baltic, four falling to AAA. One crew was picked up by a PBN-1. (22 April is very late in the campaign, and German position on the Baltic coast east of the Oder River were very small and tenuous, only in the Courland Bridgehead and the Hela Peninsula and Gulf of Danzig.)

      This article on the Catalina is very characteristic of Soviet/Russian military and naval operational reporting and historical records, sweeping statements of dubious value and very short on dates, places, times, and losses. From German records, on the other hand, Kriegsmarine cruisers and destroyers supported the troops on the beach in defending against the Ivan when ships artillery could reach: Riga, several times off Ösel (Saaremaa) and the Swörbe Peninsula, then again off Memel (Klaipeda), and in the Gulf of Danzig/Danziger Bucht/Zatokoa Gdańska. German Navy records often note that the Russian were flying Bostons, an American lend-lease aircraft, and that the Soviet pilots seemed very uneven in their ability to press home an attack. I have found in German Navy records no mention of Soviet ASR or use of Catalinas in the Baltic Sea area. 

      Well, there it is. Not much to work with. We know at least that one squadron of Soviet Naval Aviation, in the Red Banner Baltic Fleet, used six PBN-1s from October 1944 onward, and there were surely a few others as well.

      Cheers, Lou
       
    • Douglas Ratchford
      Lou and Jean-Christophe,  a recent issue of WWII History Magazine had a feature on the unsuccessful Soviet air groups Baltic operations with the Bostons. 
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 7, 2013
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        Lou and Jean-Christophe,  a recent issue of WWII History Magazine had a feature on the unsuccessful Soviet air groups' Baltic operations with the Bostons.  It described ASW, and anti shipping actions, as well as trans-Baltic tactical ops.   These actions were all costly with little success and several Bostons crashed on takeoff when overloaded with 'newer and better' ordinance that was just simply too heavy for the a/c to lift.
          I've looked all over for that magazine but must have already sent it on to a friend that I share them with.
          How do you say "Floats Up!" in Russian? :)

        From: Louis Dorny <louis41@...>
        To: PBY@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 2:00 PM
        Subject: [PBY] Soviet PBN-1 Ops in the Baltic
         

        I am pleased that Jean-Christophe thinks my Russian is good enough. In fact, it&apos;s pretty rusty, but I have used it for WWII stuff in the Baltic Sea area.

        Here is the one paragraph pertaining to the Baltic Sea area in the article and my attempt to convert it into plain English:
         
        The air force of the Baltic fleet first "Catalina" appeared in August 1944. It was one of the cars that arrived on the North. By 31 October in the 29 th separate air squadron of anti-submarine warfare had been six PBN- 1. American flying boats revealed in all respects superior to the other aircraft aviation CBF , applied for TPS. However, the rapid change of the situation in the theater , the refusal of the German command using submarines in the northern part of the Baltic Sea is not possible to take full advantage of the new aircraft . However , the high flying qualities " Catalina " have been used to solve problems of search and rescue services . Having a large range , american cars operated over areas of Central Baltic to Riga airport . One documented case of rescue Soviet pilots from the downed aircraft. 22 April 1945 12 torpedo topmachtovikov "Boston" 1st Guards and 51 th torpedo air regiments flew to attack enemy transport in the Baltic Sea. Ship&apos;s anti-aircraft artillery fire, four of them were shot down . The crew of one of them was specifically picked up by rescue aircraft PBN- 1.
         
        The Catalina first appeared in the Baltic Fleet area in August 1944. It was one of the planes (Russian, like German, uses a non-specific noun for &apos;aircraft,&apos; like &apos;machine&apos; - which can also be translated as &apos;cars&apos;) moved from the Northern Fleet area. By 31 October the 29th Separate ASW Squadron had six PBN-1s. The American planes were in all respects superior to the other aircraft in the  “CBF” (Northern Baltic Fleet area). (“TPS” meaning unknown). The rapid changes in the theater (the German eastern Front was collapsing and the Baltic coast from Kronstadt to Riga was quickly lost to the Soviets) and the few German submarines patrolling the Northern Baltic meant that the Catalina’s ASW capability could not be used. One documented case of ASR occurred on 22 April 1945. Twelve Bostons (The Soviet Navy used the Douglas Boston as a torpedo bomber) of the 1st Guards and 51st Torpedo Air Regiments attacked enemy transports in the Baltic, four falling to AAA. One crew was picked up by a PBN-1. (22 April is very late in the campaign, and German position on the Baltic coast east of the Oder River were very small and tenuous, only in the Courland Bridgehead and the Hela Peninsula and Gulf of Danzig.)

        This article on the Catalina is very characteristic of Soviet/Russian military and naval operational reporting and historical records, sweeping statements of dubious value and very short on dates, places, times, and losses. From German records, on the other hand, Kriegsmarine cruisers and destroyers supported the troops on the beach in defending against the Ivan when ships artillery could reach: Riga, several times off Ösel (Saaremaa) and the Swörbe Peninsula, then again off Memel (Klaipeda), and in the Gulf of Danzig/Danziger Bucht/Zatokoa Gdańska. German Navy records often note that the Russian were flying Bostons, an American lend-lease aircraft, and that the Soviet pilots seemed very uneven in their ability to press home an attack. I have found in German Navy records no mention of Soviet ASR or use of Catalinas in the Baltic Sea area. 

        Well, there it is. Not much to work with. We know at least that one squadron of Soviet Naval Aviation, in the Red Banner Baltic Fleet, used six PBN-1s from October 1944 onward, and there were surely a few others as well.

        Cheers, Lou
         
      • j-chris.polet
        Something like плавает высокой (Plavaïet Vuisokoï)  Jean-Christophe ________________________________ De : Douglas Ratchford
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 8, 2013
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          Something like плавает высокой (Plavaïet Vuisokoï)

           Jean-Christophe


          De : Douglas Ratchford <Ratch4@...>
          À : "PBY@yahoogroups.com" <PBY@yahoogroups.com>
          Envoyé le : Mardi 8 octobre 2013 2h57
          Objet : Re: [PBY] Soviet PBN-1 Ops in the Baltic

           
          Lou and Jean-Christophe,  a recent issue of WWII History Magazine had a feature on the unsuccessful Soviet air groups' Baltic operations with the Bostons.  It described ASW, and anti shipping actions, as well as trans-Baltic tactical ops.   These actions were all costly with little success and several Bostons crashed on takeoff when overloaded with 'newer and better' ordinance that was just simply too heavy for the a/c to lift.
            I've looked all over for that magazine but must have already sent it on to a friend that I share them with.
            How do you say "Floats Up!" in Russian? :)

          From: Louis Dorny <louis41@...>
          To: PBY@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 2:00 PM
          Subject: [PBY] Soviet PBN-1 Ops in the Baltic
           

          I am pleased that Jean-Christophe thinks my Russian is good enough. In fact, it&apos;s pretty rusty, but I have used it for WWII stuff in the Baltic Sea area.

          Here is the one paragraph pertaining to the Baltic Sea area in the article and my attempt to convert it into plain English:
           
          The air force of the Baltic fleet first "Catalina" appeared in August 1944. It was one of the cars that arrived on the North. By 31 October in the 29 th separate air squadron of anti-submarine warfare had been six PBN- 1. American flying boats revealed in all respects superior to the other aircraft aviation CBF , applied for TPS. However, the rapid change of the situation in the theater , the refusal of the German command using submarines in the northern part of the Baltic Sea is not possible to take full advantage of the new aircraft . However , the high flying qualities " Catalina " have been used to solve problems of search and rescue services . Having a large range , american cars operated over areas of Central Baltic to Riga airport . One documented case of rescue Soviet pilots from the downed aircraft. 22 April 1945 12 torpedo topmachtovikov "Boston" 1st Guards and 51 th torpedo air regiments flew to attack enemy transport in the Baltic Sea. Ship&apos;s anti-aircraft artillery fire, four of them were shot down . The crew of one of them was specifically picked up by rescue aircraft PBN- 1.
           
          The Catalina first appeared in the Baltic Fleet area in August 1944. It was one of the planes (Russian, like German, uses a non-specific noun for &apos;aircraft,&apos; like &apos;machine&apos; - which can also be translated as &apos;cars&apos;) moved from the Northern Fleet area. By 31 October the 29th Separate ASW Squadron had six PBN-1s. The American planes were in all respects superior to the other aircraft in the  “CBF” (Northern Baltic Fleet area). (“TPS” meaning unknown). The rapid changes in the theater (the German eastern Front was collapsing and the Baltic coast from Kronstadt to Riga was quickly lost to the Soviets) and the few German submarines patrolling the Northern Baltic meant that the Catalina’s ASW capability could not be used. One documented case of ASR occurred on 22 April 1945. Twelve Bostons (The Soviet Navy used the Douglas Boston as a torpedo bomber) of the 1st Guards and 51st Torpedo Air Regiments attacked enemy transports in the Baltic, four falling to AAA. One crew was picked up by a PBN-1. (22 April is very late in the campaign, and German position on the Baltic coast east of the Oder River were very small and tenuous, only in the Courland Bridgehead and the Hela Peninsula and Gulf of Danzig.)

          This article on the Catalina is very characteristic of Soviet/Russian military and naval operational reporting and historical records, sweeping statements of dubious value and very short on dates, places, times, and losses. From German records, on the other hand, Kriegsmarine cruisers and destroyers supported the troops on the beach in defending against the Ivan when ships artillery could reach: Riga, several times off Ösel (Saaremaa) and the Swörbe Peninsula, then again off Memel (Klaipeda), and in the Gulf of Danzig/Danziger Bucht/Zatokoa Gdańska. German Navy records often note that the Russian were flying Bostons, an American lend-lease aircraft, and that the Soviet pilots seemed very uneven in their ability to press home an attack. I have found in German Navy records no mention of Soviet ASR or use of Catalinas in the Baltic Sea area. 

          Well, there it is. Not much to work with. We know at least that one squadron of Soviet Naval Aviation, in the Red Banner Baltic Fleet, used six PBN-1s from October 1944 onward, and there were surely a few others as well.

          Cheers, Lou
           


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