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Re: [PBY] PBY N9767

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  • Jim Stephens
    ... I second the welcome back. I wonder what caused the damage in one of the photos? Looks like the starboard elevator has some damage. The author of the
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 1, 2011
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      On 9/30/2011 9:22 PM, Heijo Kuil wrote:
       
      Hello members.
      I second the welcome back.

      I wonder what caused the damage in one of the photos?  Looks like the starboard elevator has some damage.  The author of the photo is different than the other 4, however.

    • David Legg
      Jim - N9767 was attending a seaplane meeting in Northern Ireland last weekend (as did our own G-PBYA). For reasons best known to themselves (I ll avoid
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 1, 2011
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        Jim – N9767 was attending a seaplane meeting in Northern Ireland last weekend (as did our own G-PBYA).  For reasons best known to themselves (I’ll avoid speculation as I had to pull out of the trip myself due to other commitments and did not witness it myself) they cut both engines some distance short of their buoy and mooring rope thus rendering themselves lacking in steering and braking.  Inevitably, nature then took command and blew the aircraft backwards and the first thing it hit was a vessel resulting in the damage shown in the photo.  Lots to learn there I guess but primarily avoid giving up your power before you are tied up to something!

         

        David Legg

        Editor, The Catalina News, The Catalina Society


        From: PBY@yahoogroups.com [mailto: PBY@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Jim Stephens
        Sent: 01 October 2011 09:19
        To: PBY@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [PBY] PBY N9767

         

         

        On 9/30/2011 9:22 PM, Heijo Kuil wrote:

         
        Hello members.

        I second the welcome back.

        I wonder what caused the damage in one of the photos?  Looks like the starboard elevator has some damage.  The author of the photo is different than the other 4, however.

      • noryal
        So glad to see she s still the Princess des Étoiles :) That bring nice memories of listening to Patrick Fourticq and Franklin Devaux on the radio in 99,
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 1, 2011
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          So glad to see she's still the "Princess des Étoiles" :) That bring nice memories of listening to Patrick Fourticq and Franklin Devaux on the radio in '99, talking about the Mermoz memorial flight that was then about to start... At the time she was being displayed on the Champs Elysées, right in the middle of Paris.

          -Raphael.

          On Sat, Oct 1, 2011 at 11:38 AM, David Legg <pby5@...> wrote:
           

          Jim – N9767 was attending a seaplane meeting in Northern Ireland last weekend (as did our own G-PBYA).  For reasons best known to themselves (I’ll avoid speculation as I had to pull out of the trip myself due to other commitments and did not witness it myself) they cut both engines some distance short of their buoy and mooring rope thus rendering themselves lacking in steering and braking.  Inevitably, nature then took command and blew the aircraft backwards and the first thing it hit was a vessel resulting in the damage shown in the photo.  Lots to learn there I guess but primarily avoid giving up your power before you are tied up to something!

           

          David Legg

          Editor, The Catalina News, The Catalina Society


          From: PBY@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PBY@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Stephens
          Sent: 01 October 2011 09:19
          To: PBY@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [PBY] PBY N9767

           

           

          On 9/30/2011 9:22 PM, Heijo Kuil wrote:

           
          Hello members.

          I second the welcome back.

          I wonder what caused the damage in one of the photos?  Looks like the starboard elevator has some damage.  The author of the photo is different than the other 4, however.


        • j-christophe polet
          Nerve-racking of laws of Physics... Another mischance... Nose wheel failure at Dijon, last july. But she FLIES and FLOATS again !! That s the point. Nice to
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 1, 2011
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            Nerve-racking of laws of Physics...

            Another mischance...
            Nose wheel failure at Dijon, last july.

            But she FLIES and FLOATS again !! That's the point.

            Nice to meet G-PBYA and N9767 both together at the shows.
            I like the picture at Lough Erne.

            J-Chris.
            Keen supporter.


            De : David Legg <pby5@...>
            À : PBY@yahoogroups.com
            Envoyé le : Samedi 1 Octobre 2011 11h38
            Objet : RE: [PBY] PBY N9767

             
            Jim – N9767 was attending a seaplane meeting in Northern Ireland last weekend (as did our own G-PBYA).  For reasons best known to themselves (I’ll avoid speculation as I had to pull out of the trip myself due to other commitments and did not witness it myself) they cut both engines some distance short of their buoy and mooring rope thus rendering themselves lacking in steering and braking.  Inevitably, nature then took command and blew the aircraft backwards and the first thing it hit was a vessel resulting in the damage shown in the photo.  Lots to learn there I guess but primarily avoid giving up your power before you are tied up to something!
             
            David Legg
            Editor, The Catalina News, The Catalina Society



          • Bruce Powell
            Hello Members: I see that N9767 (C-FCRR) has had another shunt. When I had her she was the unlucky one and the hangar queen. In the late70 s she hit a rock
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 1, 2011
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              Re: PBY N9767

              Hello Members:

              I see that N9767 (C-FCRR) has had another shunt. When I had her she was the unlucky one and the hangar queen. In the late70s she hit a rock during a water pick-up in northern Alberta. The crew got her to shore and she sunk with one wing and one engine out of the water. She was salvaged and flew the next year.

              In the early 80s CRR was working a fire in northern Saskatchewan in hot and high conditions. The wind dropped and being a poor performer, failed to get airborne and ran up onto the muskeg and black spruce. Because the muskeg was soft we had to fly in dozens of sheets of plywood so that we could work on her. To salvage her we had to sling out the engines and flying surfaces with several S-55Ts and then the airframe was lifted out with an RCAF Chinook and carried 60 miles back to the airport where she was re-assembled.

              One year later at our main base in Parry Sound she was being taxied back to the hangar when the brakes failed and she hit her nose on the corner of the building.

              A year later during spring crew training the nose gear door jammed and she had to land without the nose wheel. Very little damage however as they held the nose up and then slid down the runway on the thickest part of the hull.

              In 1986 while doing waterbombing demonstrations to the Brazilian fire fighting agency in December a bomb door was slightly open due to ice build up. When she landed on the water for the next pickup, the bomb door ripped off and punched a hole in the hull. Fortunately, there was a large beach on the shore and the pilot beached her under power. We jacked her up, lowered the gear, took off the outer wings and towed her on the roads 10 miles back to the hangar.

              However, for all her bad luck and hangar-queenlyness she is still flying where most are not. And we should never forget that fact that she actually sunk a German sub. I hope she keeps going forever.

              Regards

              Bruce Powell

            • Alain M.
              Hello Bruce, Hello members, don t worry... CRR (9767) back very soon! Regards, Alain ... Hello Bruce, Hello members, don t worry... CRR (9767) back very soon!
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 1, 2011
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                Hello Bruce, Hello members,

                don't worry... CRR (9767) back very soon!

                Regards,
                Alain



                Le 1 oct. 2011 à 19:36, Bruce Powell a écrit :

                 

                Hello Members:

                I see that N9767 (C-FCRR) has had another shunt. When I had her she was the unlucky one and the hangar queen. In the late70s she hit a rock during a water pick-up in northern Alberta. The crew got her to shore and she sunk with one wing and one engine out of the water. She was salvaged and flew the next year.

                In the early 80s CRR was working a fire in northern Saskatchewan in hot and high conditions. The wind dropped and being a poor performer, failed to get airborne and ran up onto the muskeg and black spruce. Because the muskeg was soft we had to fly in dozens of sheets of plywood so that we could work on her. To salvage her we had to sling out the engines and flying surfaces with several S-55Ts and then the airframe was lifted out with an RCAF Chinook and carried 60 miles back to the airport where she was re-assembled.

                One year later at our main base in Parry Sound she was being taxied back to the hangar when the brakes failed and she hit her nose on the corner of the building.

                A year later during spring crew training the nose gear door jammed and she had to land without the nose wheel. Very little damage however as they held the nose up and then slid down the runway on the thickest part of the hull.


                In 1986 while doing waterbombing demonstrations to the Brazilian fire fighting agency in December a bomb door was slightly open due to ice build up. When she landed on the water for the next pickup, the bomb door ripped off and punched a hole in the hull. Fortunately, there was a large beach on the shore and the pilot beached her under power. We jacked her up, lowered the gear, took off the outer wings and towed her on the roads 10 miles back to the hangar.

                However, for all her bad luck and hangar-queenlyness she is still flying where most are not. And we should never forget that fact that she actually sunk a German sub. I hope she keeps going forever.

                Regards

                Bruce Powell




              • Douglas Ratchford
                Bruce,  N9767 sounds related to ol 740,   ex RCAF9742, N68740 at Lone Star Flight Museum.   In it s operational life it hit ice floes and  pine trees,
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 1, 2011
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                  Bruce,  N9767 sounds related to 'ol 740,   ex RCAF9742, N68740 at Lone Star Flight Museum.   In it's operational life it hit ice floes and  pine trees, in civil flying hit submerged mudbanks, and as a static display floated off her stands in Hurrican Ike and hit the building, a small truck, some displayed artifacts and rear ended Lone Star's  Lockheed Harpoon that was also sloshing about.

                  --- On Sat, 10/1/11, Bruce Powell <bruce@...> wrote:

                  From: Bruce Powell <bruce@...>
                  Subject: [PBY] Re: PBY N9767
                  To: PBY@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Saturday, October 1, 2011, 5:36 PM

                   

                  Hello Members:

                  I see that N9767 (C-FCRR) has had another shunt. When I had her she was the unlucky one and the hangar queen. In the late70s she hit a rock during a water pick-up in northern Alberta. The crew got her to shore and she sunk with one wing and one engine out of the water. She was salvaged and flew the next year.

                  In the early 80s CRR was working a fire in northern Saskatchewan in hot and high conditions. The wind dropped and being a poor performer, failed to get airborne and ran up onto the muskeg and black spruce. Because the muskeg was soft we had to fly in dozens of sheets of plywood so that we could work on her. To salvage her we had to sling out the engines and flying surfaces with several S-55Ts and then the airframe was lifted out with an RCAF Chinook and carried 60 miles back to the airport where she was re-assembled.

                  One year later at our main base in Parry Sound she was being taxied back to the hangar when the brakes failed and she hit her nose on the corner of the building.

                  A year later during spring crew training the nose gear door jammed and she had to land without the nose wheel. Very little damage however as they held the nose up and then slid down the runway on the thickest part of the hull.

                  In 1986 while doing waterbombing demonstrations to the Brazilian fire fighting agency in December a bomb door was slightly open due to ice build up. When she landed on the water for the next pickup, the bomb door ripped off and punched a hole in the hull. Fortunately, there was a large beach on the shore and the pilot beached her under power. We jacked her up, lowered the gear, took off the outer wings and towed her on the roads 10 miles back to the hangar.

                  However, for all her bad luck and hangar-queenlyness she is still flying where most are not. And we should never forget that fact that she actually sunk a German sub. I hope she keeps going forever.

                  Regards

                  Bruce Powell

                • Bruce Powell
                  Bonjour J-Christophe: I do not believe that CRR was ever owned by Austin Airways who had their main bases in Timmins, Ontario and Toronto Island Airport with
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 14, 2011
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                    Bonjour J-Christophe:

                     

                    I do not believe that CRR was ever owned by Austin Airways who had their main bases in Timmins, Ontario and Toronto Island Airport with sub-bases throughout Ontario and Manitoba. They had I believe, two freighters that were never converted to waterbombers. Certainly the paint scheme of the Canso at the Webequie picture was very similar to the Avalon waterbombers and it might have been an Avalon waterbomber on loan to Austin Airways as Austin owned a large interest in Avalon until my family bought the company. However, we bought Avalon in 1979 but I don’t remember which part of the year. But I don’t doubt that Avalon would have co-operated fully with Austin in employing the aircraft when they were not waterbombing. By the way, Webequie is a Cree Indian village in northern Ontario.

                     

                    My family’s company, Georgian Bay Airways, competed with Austin Airways throughout the 50’s and 60’s in northern Ontario and the Canadian Arctic using Cessnas, Beavers, Otters, Twin Otters, Beech 18’s and DC-3’s. Austin’s was the larger company and when Jack Austin (or perhaps his estate) wanted to sell in the late 60’s we put in an offer. Our offer was beaten by the Deluce family of White River, Ontario and they took over Austin’s and expanded it with a fleet of Avro HS-748’s. They later sold the company to the Cree Indian bands who inhabited the shores of Hudson’s Bay and I believe the company is still operating. The Deluce’s latest aviation company is Porter Airlines based at Toronto Island Airport and they have a couple of dozen DeHavilland Canada Dash 8’s serving the east of Canada and the US.

                     

                    I have looked closely at the photo but without my Canso picture collection (which is at my summer home in Canada) I cannot positively identify the aircraft. It seems to have a 5A tail and as I said, it carries an Avalon paint scheme. The background is definitely northern Ontario in the summer as the horizon is flat and with lots of black spruce trees with some clouds and not much wind. Also, the dock is filled with Cree kids who always liked to greet an airplane when it arrived at their village. I do remember doing some fuel hauls for Austin’s so maybe this was one of them.

                     

                    I have attached a photo of the Avalon and GBA main base in Parry Sound, Ontario so that you can try to puzzle out which aircraft is which.

                     

                    All the best

                     

                    Bruce Powell

                     

                     

                    From: j-christophe polet [mailto:prouilhacat2@...]
                    Sent: 14 December 2011 13:30
                    To: bruce@...
                    Subject: Tr : [PBY] Re: PBY N9767

                     

                     

                    Sorry, I gorgot the attachment.

                     

                     

                    ----- Mail transféré -----
                    De : j-christophe polet <prouilhacat2@...>
                    À : "bruce@..." <bruce@...>
                    Envoyé le : Mercredi 14 Décembre 2011 14h23
                    Objet : Re : [PBY] Re: PBY N9767

                    Hello Bruce Powell,

                    I've just found this picture, said to be Austin Airways Canso :

                    ref.A1979 - Austin Aw. makes a freight delivery to Webequie.

                     

                    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ddcjr/tags/a79/

                    I sent Alain Maire the pic. because I seem to recognize C-FCRR with Avalon Airways.
                    The nose bumper, canvas-made, is typical... in my opinion.
                    But we, Alain and I, would have your opinion.
                    Thanks,
                    J-Christophe

                     


                    De : Bruce Powell <bruce@...>
                    À : PBY@yahoogroups.com
                    Envoyé le : Samedi 1 Octobre 2011 19h36
                    Objet : [PBY] Re: PBY N9767

                     

                    Hello Members:

                    I see that N9767 (C-FCRR) has had another shunt. When I had her she was the unlucky one and the hangar queen. In the late70’s she hit a rock during a water pick-up in northern Alberta. The crew got her to shore and she sunk with one wing and one engine out of the water. She was salvaged and flew the next year.

                    In the early 80’s CRR was working a fire in northern Saskatchewan in hot and high conditions. The wind dropped and being a poor performer, failed to get airborne and ran up onto the muskeg and black spruce. Because the muskeg was soft we had to fly in dozens of sheets of plywood so that we could work on her. To salvage her we had to sling out the engines and flying surfaces with several S-55T’s and then the airframe was lifted out with an RCAF Chinook and carried 60 miles back to the airport where she was re-assembled.

                    One year later at our main base in Parry Sound she was being taxied back to the hangar when the brakes failed and she hit her nose on the corner of the building.

                    A year later during spring crew training the nose gear door jammed and she had to land without the nose wheel. Very little damage however as they held the nose up and then slid down the runway on the thickest part of the hull.

                    In 1986 while doing waterbombing demonstrations to the Brazilian fire fighting agency in December a bomb door was slightly open due to ice build up. When she landed on the water for the next pickup, the bomb door ripped off and punched a hole in the hull. Fortunately, there was a large beach on the shore and the pilot beached her under power. We jacked her up, lowered the gear, took off the outer wings and towed her on the roads 10 miles back to the hangar.

                    However, for all her bad luck and hangar-queenlyness she is still flying where most are not. And we should never forget that fact that she actually sunk a German sub. I hope she keeps going forever.

                    Regards

                    Bruce Powell

                     

                     

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