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Re: [PBY] TOO LONG AGO

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  • George Herold
    I JUST DON T KNOW HOW THOSE BELLY ROBBERS ON THE HULBERT MUST HAVE FELT WHEN THEY HAD TO FIRE UP THEIR OVENS AND COOK UP SOME CHOW FOR ABOUT 38 OF US AT
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 1, 2010
      I JUST DON'T KNOW  HOW THOSE "BELLY ROBBERS" ON THE HULBERT MUST HAVE FELT WHEN THEY HAD TO "FIRE UP" THEIR OVENS AND COOK UP SOME CHOW FOR ABOUT 38 OF US AT AROUND 2200 ON THE NIGHT OF 25 JUNE IN 1942. ------ AFTER FINISHING EATING, THEY HAD TO LET US ALL SHOWER, THEN GET CHECKED OUT BY THEIR MEDICAL STAFF - SO WE WERE ALL GIVEN SOAP, TOWELS, CLEAN SKIVVIES, ETC, AND AFTERWARDS SHOWN CLEAN BUNKS. BY THIS TIME ITS AFTER 0000 ON THE 26TH. AND REMEMBER, - THIS WAS A CONVERTED FOUR-PIPER, I BELIEVE, MAYBE EVEN OLDER THAN OUR S27. AND IT WAS STILL JUNE IN 1942, SO THE ENTIRE SHIP WAS DARKENED SOMEWHAT, - AT THAT TIME THE ENEMY WAS STILL "ACTIVE" IN THAT AREA. I THINK THERE WERE OTHER SHIPS AND PBYs NEARBY, SWINGING ON THE HOOK, BUT YOU COULDN'T SEE ANYTHING. THE BLACKOUTS TOOK CARE OF THAT. WOULD THERE ALWAYS BE SOME "BODY" ON EACH PBY, OR WERE THEY LEFT EMPTY, AND ON THEIR OWN? THE NIGHTS WERE "SHORT", AND REALLY DARK. THE BLACKOUTS WERE COMPLETE. SO, 42ND STREET AND TIMES SQUARE, IT WASN'T. - BUT, AT AGE 18, ONE WOULD TAKE IT "ALL IN STRIDE" - WHATEVER THAT MEANS. - GEOSS
    • Frank DeLorenzo
      George, Larry: Don t forget we had that detachable black metal ladder that would fit to the port waist hatch. It worked both on land or swinging at a buoy.
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 1, 2010
        George, Larry:

        Don't forget we had that detachable black metal ladder that would fit to the port waist hatch.  It worked
        both on land or swinging at a buoy.  Naturally, it was removed and taken aboard before flight operations.  It saved many a skinned shin!

        DeLo

        =====
        On Jul 31, 2010, at 8:31 PM, Larry Katz wrote:


        George,I went on the port side,as the motor launch took us there.Reason I say port,we would be heading into the wind when tied to a bouy and usually when stationed aboard ship or land,with the wind blowing and the bow facing into the wind,seems to me now looking back it was through the sliding hatch on the PBY3's and through the blister on the 5's.Hope I am right....... .......Larry( sure there were times we came through the starboard hatch or blister)
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, July 31, 2010 5:55 PM
        Subject: [PBY] TOO LONG AGO

         

        JUST ANOTHER STUPID QUESTION. WHEN BEING PICKED UP BY VP41 & VP43 ON 25 JUNE 1942, AT AMCHITKA, SOMEONE IS GOING TO HAVE TO TELL ME JUST HOW I WOULD HAVE ENTERED THIS PBY, WHICH WAS ON THE WATER AT THE TIME AND I WAS IN A SCURVY, WORM-EATEN ROWBOAT, BIG ENOUGH FOR THREE. I'VE FORGOTTEN, HONESTLY.  - ON CONCRETE, WHAT'S THE NORMAL PROCEDURE WHEN ENTERING OR EXITING YOUR PBY? ---------- SKIPPER? LARRY? BILL M? -- NO WISECRACKS, BILL, I'M SERIOUS.  - FROM A SUBMARINE, PRIOR TO 1945, WHEN GOING ON LIBERTY IN A CLEAN SUIT OF WHITES, ONE WOULD NORMALLY EXIT SHIP VIA THE AFTER BATTERY HATCH AND NOT FROM EITHER TORPEDO ROOM OR THE AFTER ENGINE ROOM. ONE COULD ALSO EXIT FROM THE CONTRL ROOM VIA THE LOWER & UPPER CONNING TOWER HATCHES. HOWEVER, THAT ALSO WAS AN EASY WAY TO MARK UP A CLEAN SUIT OF WHITES WHILE CLIMBING UP OR DOWN FROM THE BRIDGE VIA THE FAIRWATER. - YOU WOULD CERTAINLY WANT TO LOOK NEAT WHEN "HITTING THE BEACH".  - AND, AGAIN - I JUST CAN'T RECALL HOW I GOT  ABOARD THAT SEAPLANE TENDER FROM THE PBY ON THE WATER? -  HEY! - IT WAS A WONDERFULL & COMFORTABLE FLIGHT - NO ENEMY INVOLVED, AND I GUESS THATS ALL THAT MATTERED.  - GEOSS



      • Larry Katz
        Frank,George, Bringing back old memories,with tongue in cheek,we always thought it was the plane captains job for everything.I cannot remember ever releasing
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 1, 2010
          Frank,George,
          Bringing back old memories,with tongue in cheek,we always thought it was the plane captains job for everything.I cannot remember ever releasing us from the bouy when we were secured to it,or pulling in the ladder when ready to depart.Frank was the pilots the last one to leave the planes after landing? I remember the radiomen securing the electrical work and the mechs securing the tower and other check off lists,however I cannot recall the procedure in leaving the aircraft on the water bouy. Larry
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, August 01, 2010 11:27 AM
          Subject: Re: [PBY] TOO LONG AGO

           

          George, Larry:


          Don't forget we had that detachable black metal ladder that would fit to the port waist hatch.  It worked
          both on land or swinging at a buoy.  Naturally, it was removed and taken aboard before flight operations.  It saved many a skinned shin!

          DeLo

          =====
          On Jul 31, 2010, at 8:31 PM, Larry Katz wrote:


          George,I went on the port side,as the motor launch took us there.Reason I say port,we would be heading into the wind when tied to a bouy and usually when stationed aboard ship or land,with the wind blowing and the bow facing into the wind,seems to me now looking back it was through the sliding hatch on the PBY3's and through the blister on the 5's.Hope I am right....... .......Larry( sure there were times we came through the starboard hatch or blister)
           
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Saturday, July 31, 2010 5:55 PM
          Subject: [PBY] TOO LONG AGO

           

          JUST ANOTHER STUPID QUESTION. WHEN BEING PICKED UP BY VP41 & VP43 ON 25 JUNE 1942, AT AMCHITKA, SOMEONE IS GOING TO HAVE TO TELL ME JUST HOW I WOULD HAVE ENTERED THIS PBY, WHICH WAS ON THE WATER AT THE TIME AND I WAS IN A SCURVY, WORM-EATEN ROWBOAT, BIG ENOUGH FOR THREE. I'VE FORGOTTEN, HONESTLY.  - ON CONCRETE, WHAT'S THE NORMAL PROCEDURE WHEN ENTERING OR EXITING YOUR PBY? ---------- SKIPPER? LARRY? BILL M? -- NO WISECRACKS, BILL, I'M SERIOUS.  - FROM A SUBMARINE, PRIOR TO 1945, WHEN GOING ON LIBERTY IN A CLEAN SUIT OF WHITES, ONE WOULD NORMALLY EXIT SHIP VIA THE AFTER BATTERY HATCH AND NOT FROM EITHER TORPEDO ROOM OR THE AFTER ENGINE ROOM. ONE COULD ALSO EXIT FROM THE CONTRL ROOM VIA THE LOWER & UPPER CONNING TOWER HATCHES. HOWEVER, THAT ALSO WAS AN EASY WAY TO MARK UP A CLEAN SUIT OF WHITES WHILE CLIMBING UP OR DOWN FROM THE BRIDGE VIA THE FAIRWATER. - YOU WOULD CERTAINLY WANT TO LOOK NEAT WHEN "HITTING THE BEACH".  - AND, AGAIN - I JUST CAN'T RECALL HOW I GOT  ABOARD THAT SEAPLANE TENDER FROM THE PBY ON THE WATER? -  HEY! - IT WAS A WONDERFULL & COMFORTABLE FLIGHT - NO ENEMY INVOLVED, AND I GUESS THATS ALL THAT MATTERED.  - GEOSS



        • Frank DeLorenzo
          Larry: I think the pilots were the 1st ones to leave the plane both on land and water (but I m not positive!). However there were differing circumstances,
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 1, 2010
            Larry:

            I think the pilots were the 1st ones to leave the plane both on land and water (but I'm not positive!).  However there were differing circumstances, i.e. weather and water conditions (if swinging at the buoy) might require a pilot and add'l crew members to stay aboard.  I know I've spent many a night sitting in the cockpit on the water swinging at the buoy.  If you had senior officers aboard Navy Etiquette stated that the most senior officer would be the first to disembark and the last to embark.  Same navy Custom as boarding or leaving a ship!  I remember having a 3 star admiral aboard my plane on a survey trip during WWII to
            Guadalcanal and other SoPac islands and the admiral weighed 300 pounds.  Bringing him aboard through the waist hatch from a motor whaleboat while my plane was swinging at a buoy was quite a feat!  I forgot his name but I remember that he was the Inspector General of the U.S Pacific Fleet!  On that same trip he also had to board a U.S. Navy ship via a Jacob's Ladder--that was still "another feat!"

            Larry, you'll have to stop bringing all of these ancient memories to my recollections!!<grin>

            DeLo


            =========
            On Aug 1, 2010, at 11:53 AM, Larry Katz wrote:


            Frank,George,
            Bringing back old memories,with tongue in cheek,we always thought it was the plane captains job for everything.I cannot remember ever releasing us from the bouy when we were secured to it,or pulling in the ladder when ready to depart.Frank was the pilots the last one to leave the planes after landing? I remember the radiomen securing the electrical work and the mechs securing the tower and other check off lists,however I cannot recall the procedure in leaving the aircraft on the water bouy. Larry
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, August 01, 2010 11:27 AM
            Subject: Re: [PBY] TOO LONG AGO

             

            George, Larry:


            Don't forget we had that detachable black metal ladder that would fit to the port waist hatch.  It worked
            both on land or swinging at a buoy.  Naturally, it was removed and taken aboard before flight operations.  It saved many a skinned shin!

            DeLo

            =====
            On Jul 31, 2010, at 8:31 PM, Larry Katz wrote:


            George,I went on the port side,as the motor launch took us there.Reason I say port,we would be heading into the wind when tied to a bouy and usually when stationed aboard ship or land,with the wind blowing and the bow facing into the wind,seems to me now looking back it was through the sliding hatch on the PBY3's and through the blister on the 5's.Hope I am right....... .......Larry( sure there were times we came through the starboard hatch or blister)
             
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Saturday, July 31, 2010 5:55 PM
            Subject: [PBY] TOO LONG AGO

             

            JUST ANOTHER STUPID QUESTION. WHEN BEING PICKED UP BY VP41 & VP43 ON 25 JUNE 1942, AT AMCHITKA, SOMEONE IS GOING TO HAVE TO TELL ME JUST HOW I WOULD HAVE ENTERED THIS PBY, WHICH WAS ON THE WATER AT THE TIME AND I WAS IN A SCURVY, WORM-EATEN ROWBOAT, BIG ENOUGH FOR THREE. I'VE FORGOTTEN, HONESTLY.  - ON CONCRETE, WHAT'S THE NORMAL PROCEDURE WHEN ENTERING OR EXITING YOUR PBY? ---------- SKIPPER? LARRY? BILL M? -- NO WISECRACKS, BILL, I'M SERIOUS.  - FROM A SUBMARINE, PRIOR TO 1945, WHEN GOING ON LIBERTY IN A CLEAN SUIT OF WHITES, ONE WOULD NORMALLY EXIT SHIP VIA THE AFTER BATTERY HATCH AND NOT FROM EITHER TORPEDO ROOM OR THE AFTER ENGINE ROOM. ONE COULD ALSO EXIT FROM THE CONTRL ROOM VIA THE LOWER & UPPER CONNING TOWER HATCHES. HOWEVER, THAT ALSO WAS AN EASY WAY TO MARK UP A CLEAN SUIT OF WHITES WHILE CLIMBING UP OR DOWN FROM THE BRIDGE VIA THE FAIRWATER. - YOU WOULD CERTAINLY WANT TO LOOK NEAT WHEN "HITTING THE BEACH".  - AND, AGAIN - I JUST CAN'T RECALL HOW I GOT  ABOARD THAT SEAPLANE TENDER FROM THE PBY ON THE WATER? -  HEY! - IT WAS A WONDERFULL & COMFORTABLE FLIGHT - NO ENEMY INVOLVED, AND I GUESS THATS ALL THAT MATTERED.  - GEOSS






          • Larry Katz
            Frank these days all I have to do is sit and think. My son Louis is here until Tuesday morning and he has been taking care of me since he got here.He is good
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 1, 2010
               
              Frank these days all I have to do is sit and think. My son Louis is here until Tuesday morning and he has been taking care of me since he got here.He is good at cooking,cleaning and whatever else it takes to take care of a house......He will be 60 on the 24th of this month and has lived by himself ever since he left home when he went off to college in 1968...He is the attorney who works for the FDIC. and he will retire in another 4 years when he gets in his 30.
              Talking about our experiences in who is first and last in respect to rank reminds me of a real funny one.Dont remember If I ever mentioned this,but it was real,real funny. We had just come in from a base up the coast of Western Australia (when I say in,I mean Perth)and we came in from a town called Geraldton which was one of our advanced bases.Anyway,booze up there was dirt cheap,and at this hotel we knew had pony's of Scotch that they served . So comming back to Perth,I had my flight jacket loaded with bottles of pony Scotch's.After landing and pulling our plane up to the refueling dock which was in the rear of our AD shack,and on the pier was our Captain of the base and an Australian High Command Officer.When I was thrown up the refueling line attached to the hose,I bent over and one of the ponys slipped out of my flight jacket,hit the trailing edge of the wing,landed right in front of the Captain,I thought "Oh hell"anyway when I got through with the refueling and got off the wing,the skipper handed me the pony with a grin and never said a word.
              I had thought all along that the Crap will now hit the fan,but it did not.
              I heard about that for such a long,long time after that from the rest of the outfit.
              Enough rambling..............Larry
               
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, August 01, 2010 12:42 PM
              Subject: Re: [PBY] TOO LONG AGO

               

              Larry:


              I think the pilots were the 1st ones to leave the plane both on land and water (but I'm not positive!).  However there were differing circumstances, i.e. weather and water conditions (if swinging at the buoy) might require a pilot and add'l crew members to stay aboard.  I know I've spent many a night sitting in the cockpit on the water swinging at the buoy.  If you had senior officers aboard Navy Etiquette stated that the most senior officer would be the first to disembark and the last to embark.  Same navy Custom as boarding or leaving a ship!  I remember having a 3 star admiral aboard my plane on a survey trip during WWII to
              Guadalcanal and other SoPac islands and the admiral weighed 300 pounds.  Bringing him aboard through the waist hatch from a motor whaleboat while my plane was swinging at a buoy was quite a feat!  I forgot his name but I remember that he was the Inspector General of the U.S Pacific Fleet!  On that same trip he also had to board a U.S. Navy ship via a Jacob's Ladder--that was still "another feat!"

              Larry, you'll have to stop bringing all of these ancient memories to my recollections! !<grin>

              DeLo


              =========
              On Aug 1, 2010, at 11:53 AM, Larry Katz wrote:


              Frank,George,
              ! Bringing back old memories,with tongue in cheek,we always thought it was the plane captains job for everything.I cannot remember ever releasing us from the bouy when we were secured to it,or pulling in the ladder when ready to depart.Frank was the pilots the last one to leave the planes after landing? I remember the radiomen securing the electrical work and the mechs securing the tower and other check off lists,however I cannot recall the procedure in leaving the aircraft on the water bouy. Larry
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, August 01, 2010 11:27 AM
              Subject: Re: [PBY] TOO LONG AGO

               

              George, Larry:


              Don't forget we had that detachable black metal ladder that would fit to the port waist hatch.  It worked
              both on land or swinging at a buoy.  Naturally, it was removed and taken aboard before flight operations.  It saved many a skinned shin!

              DeLo

              =====
              On Jul 31, 2010, at 8:31 PM, Larry Katz wrote:


              George,I went on the port side,as the motor launch took us there.Reason I say port,we would be heading into the wind when tied to a bouy and usually when stationed aboard ship or land,with the wind blowing and the bow facing into the wind,seems to me now looking back it was through the sliding hatch on the PBY3's and through the blister on the 5's.Hope I am right....... .......Larry( sure there were times we came through the starboard hatch or blister)
               
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Saturday, July 31, 2010 5:55 PM
              Subject: [PBY] TOO LONG AGO

               

              JUST ANOTHER STUPID QUESTION. WHEN BEING PICKED UP BY VP41 & VP43 ON 25 JUNE 1942, AT AMCHITKA, SOMEONE IS GOING TO HAVE TO TELL ME JUST HOW I WOULD HAVE ENTERED THIS PBY, WHICH WAS ON THE WATER ! AT THE TIME AND I WAS IN A SCURVY, WORM-EATEN ROWBOAT, BIG ENOUGH FOR THREE. I'VE FORGOTTEN, HONESTLY.  - ON CONCRETE, WHAT'S THE NORMAL PROCEDURE WHEN ENTERING OR EXITING YOUR PBY? ---------- SKIPPER? LARRY? BILL M? -- NO WISECRACKS, BILL, I'M SERIOUS.  - FROM A SUBMARINE, PRIOR TO 1945, WHEN GOING ON LIBERTY IN A CLEAN SUIT OF WHITES, ONE WOULD NORMALLY EXIT SHIP VIA THE AFTER BATTERY HATCH AND NOT FROM EITHER TORPEDO ROOM OR THE AFTER ENGINE ROOM. ONE COULD ALSO EXIT FROM THE CONTRL ROOM VIA THE LOWER & UPPER CONNING TOWER HATCHES. HOWEVER, THAT ALSO WAS AN EASY WAY TO MARK UP A CLEAN SUIT OF WHITES WHILE CLIMBING UP OR DOWN FROM THE BRIDGE VIA THE FAIRWATER. - YOU WOULD CERTAINLY WANT TO LOOK NEAT WHEN "HITTING THE BEACH".  - AND, AGAIN - I JUST CAN'T RECALL HOW I GOT  ABOARD THAT SEAPLANE TENDER FROM THE PBY ON THE WATER? -  HEY! - IT WAS A WONDERFULL & COMFORTABLE FLIGHT - NO ENEMY INVOLVED, AND I GUESS THATS ALL THAT MATTERED.  - GEOSS






            • Billmaris
              AN GEORGE--SS AS I SAID BEFORE YOU CAME ABOARD OVER THE FANTAIL, THE GALLEY WAS IN THE AFT END OF THE FORWARD DECK HOUSE (RIGHT WHERE THE TWO FORWARD STACKS
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 1, 2010
                AN GEORGE--SS
                AS I SAID BEFORE YOU CAME ABOARD OVER THE FANTAIL,  THE GALLEY WAS IN THE AFT END OF THE FORWARD DECK HOUSE (RIGHT WHERE THE TWO FORWARD STACKS USED TO BE (IT WAS EASY TO FIND--(JUST LOOK FOR CHARLEY NOBLE) OVER THE AVIATION CREW QUARTERS THAT WOULD TAKE CARE OF 3 CREWS AND THE PILOTS WERE BERTHED JUST FORWARD OF THE ENLISTED CREWS.  ONLY THE CREWS FLYING THE NEXT DAY OCCUPIED THE BUNKS SO THEY COULD BE ALL LOCATED.  THE HULBERT WAS THE BEST FEEDER OF ALL THE TENDERS--ALWAYS GOOD MORNING WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE FOR BREAKFAST---THEY PROVIDE DAMMED SIGHT BETTER THAN THE CASCO WHO HAD A CHIEF BELLY ROBBER ABOARD IN THE CREWS MESS.
                ONLY A COUPLE TIME DID MY CREW STAY ABOARD ALL NIGHT FOR SECURITY--NO PILOTS EITHER AS THEY SLEPT ABOARD THE TENDER.  AT LEAST YOU DIDN'T GET SPRAYED DOWN RIDING THE LIBERTY LAUNCH EITHER WAY. CHENOFSKI AND NAZAN BAY WERE THE ONLY TWO PLACES WE HUNG ON THE BUOY. THAT MADE IT EASY FOR THE BEEBEE STACKERS TO LOAD ORDNANCE UNDER THE WINGS. AND CHECK AMMO IN THE BLISTERS, NOSE AND TUNNEL,  FUEL AND OIL WERE RECIEVED OVER THE FANTAIL OF THE TENDER AS WE WERE SECURED THERE UNTIL FINISHED THEN OFF TO A BUOY OR AIRBORNE AGAIN.
                ENOUGH SAID IT'S MAKING ME HOME SICK GEORGE!
                SATB GB BILL, VP-43


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              • Billmaris
                HI GUYS& GSS I WAS THE ONLY QUALIFIED FLYING BOW HOOK IN THE SQUADRON SO I ALWAYS RIGGED FOR MOORING AND SNATCHED THE BUOY WITH THE J HOOK UNTIL THE LIZARD
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 1, 2010
                  HI GUYS& GSS
                  I WAS THE ONLY QUALIFIED FLYING BOW HOOK IN THE SQUADRON SO I ALWAYS RIGGED FOR MOORING AND SNATCHED THE BUOY WITH THE "J" HOOK  UNTIL THE LIZARD LINE COULD BE MADE FAST.  THEN I SECURED THE NOSE, DROPPED THRU THE NOSE GUN HATCH, SECURING THE WTC AND WENT AFT TO SEE HOW THE 2ND MEC WAS DOING IN THE TOWER AS THE PILOT SECURED ENGINES. THE REVERSE WAS DONE AS WE DEPARTED THE BUOY. MOST OF THE TIME I MANNED THE TOWER ON TAKEOFF!
                  LOVE THE SOUND OF THOSE FAITHFUL 1830-92'S AT 2700 RPM AND 65+ " MFP!
                  SATB GB BILL, VP-43


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