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42879RE: [PBY] Naval Channel Flare?

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  • Ned Barnett
    Apr 24 4:11 PM
    • 0 Attachment

      I had no idea they were rare – I thought they were commonplace

       

      Ned Barnett, APR

      Marketing & PR Fellow, American Hospital Association

      Barnett Marketing Communications

      420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276 - Las Vegas NV 89110

      702-561-1167 - cell/text

      www.barnettmarcom.com - twitter @nedbarnett

      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/

       

      05-6-16 BMC Logo

       

      From: PBY@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PBY@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of billmaris@...
      Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2014 4:06 PM
      To: PBY@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [PBY] Naval Channel Flare?

       

       

      JUST TO MAKE SURE I GOOGLED IT--SO HERE IS YOUR ANSWER--WE CARRIED THEM ON ALL FLTS--THEY WERE HAND DROPPED INTO THE WATER AS MARKERS AND WIND DIRECTION INDICATORS--AL I EVER SEEN WERE VARNISHED AND YELLOWISH IN COLOR ABT 10"L AND 2"DIA--SOME TIMES CALLED SMOKE FLARES?

      SATB GB BILL VP-43

       

       


      This rare wooden and pewter fuse was excavated at Charleston, South Carolina. These devices were dropped from aircraft to mark channels and locations of anything that needed to be recognized in the sea. They were dropped and had a weight on the bottom that would make it sit upright and give off smoke. The wood is pine and is intact, and the nose is pewter with brass tacks. Note the flange device on the nose that was designed to make the flare turn upright in the water. Also included is the brass nose of another flare that was, apparently, expended, because the fuse hole is open and the fuse is gone.
      Item

      SATB GB BILL VP-43.

       

      World War II Naval Channel Flare. This rare wooden and pewter fuse was excavated at Charleston, South Carolina. These devices were dropped from aircraft to mark channels and locations of anything that needed to be recognized in the sea. They were dropped and had a weight on the bottom that would make it sit upright and give off smoke. The wood is pine and is intact, and the nose is pewter with brass tacks. Note the flange device on the nose that was designed to make the flare turn upright in the water. Also included is the brass nose of another flare that was, apparently, expended, because the fuse hole is open and the fuse is gone.
      Item

       


      From: "Jim Stephens" <jws@...>
      To: PBY@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2014 9:43:52 AM
      Subject: Re: [PBY] Naval Channel Flare?

       

       

      The ones in the photo somehow look larger than the one you have on your desk. 

       

      Not sure how they work, are the actually active pyro?  I guess I'm just dense about that.  I'm thinking a variation of a flare gun and firing something in the air.   Even dropping one over water and what would happen other than a splash isn't obvious.

       

      Education of a landlubber is required here.

       

      Jim

       

      On 4/24/2014 4:09 AM, pby55@... wrote:

      Yes Jim it is wood with a metal tip. Any clues ? Thanks, Ron

       

      Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

       

       

      Jim Stephens <jws@...> wrote:

       

       

       

      On 4/23/2014 7:42 PM, pby55@... wrote:

      Good evening mates! I was doing a little trading/ picking the other day and came across this piece. I was told it was a WW II Naval Channel Flare. Any comments? Please ? Thanks! Ron Moran  P.S. It was found in Charleston Harbor (South Carolina)

       

      It looks like it is wood with a metal tip?  Or is it something else/

       

      Jim

       

       

       

       

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