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Sheldons 2012 Timeline

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  • happy_buddha_au
    Any news from Sheldon if this still stands? It s the first of June and no arrests
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2012
      Any news from Sheldon if this still stands? It's the first of June and no arrests
    • Paul Wilson
      That thought had crossed my mind as well, though they may be happening, but not yet publicised. Disclosure is now on the back burner (SaLuSa), and the banking
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2012
        That thought had crossed my mind as well, though they may be happening, but not yet publicised. Disclosure is now on the back burner (SaLuSa), and the banking and financial changes have risen up the ladder, though how they can be implemented before the demise of the cabal via mass arrests I don't know. Let's wait and see what Matthew Ward has to say in the next few days. Allies are dragging their feet again (as hinted at before by Sheldan), and we know the Galactics won't do it for us. Still far too many asleep - just ask among your friends and acquaintances. I spoke to my bank manager yesterday about the coming changes. He thought I was crazy!
         
        Paul 
        From: happy_buddha_au <happy_buddha_au@...>
        To: PAO_Connection@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, 1 June 2012 5:14 PM
        Subject: [PAO_Connection] Sheldons 2012 Timeline

         
        Any news from Sheldon if this still stands? It's the first of June and no arrests



      • Steven
        Sheldan s messages are getting very old. Soon, soon, soon, soon, and more soon. Soon never comes. Can t believe any of it anymore. I have not heard of even one
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 2, 2012
          Sheldan's messages are getting very old. Soon, soon, soon, soon, and more soon. Soon never comes. Can't believe any of it anymore. I have not heard of even one arrest of the mass murdering criminals that run this planet. How come there is never any real proof that comes along with the B.S. Show me one, just one bit of proof. I rest my case.
          --- In PAO_Connection@yahoogroups.com, "happy_buddha_au" <happy_buddha_au@...> wrote:
          >
          > Any news from Sheldon if this still stands? It's the first of June and no arrests
          >
        • GameTraderX Yahoo
          Here you go. Remember that not all of us are meant to ascend. It s up to your soul to make the choice. GTX
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 2, 2012
            Here you go. Remember that not all of us are meant to ascend. It's up to your soul to make the choice.

            GTX


            Butchers beware: Taylor war crimes case a giant leap forward for international law, say experts

            Friday, June 1, 2012

            By Douglas Quan, Postmedia News

            Liberian ex-president Charles Taylor, convicted of war crimes, listens to the judge delivering his sentence May 30, 2012.
            Liberian ex-president Charles Taylor, convicted of war crimes, listens to the judge delivering his sentence May 30, 2012.
            Photographed by:
            Screen grab, AFP/GettyImages

            The sentencing this week of former Liberian president Charles Taylor to 50 years in prison for aiding and abetting war crimes in neighbouring Sierra Leone has been described as a watershed moment in international justice.

            Postmedia News talked to two international law experts — Valerie Oosterveld of Western University in London, Ont., and Errol Mendes of the University of Ottawa — to discuss the significance of this case, which world leaders might appear next on a court docket and the challenges involved in prosecuting them.

            Q: What did Taylor do?

            A: Though he never stepped foot in Sierra Leone during its civil war, Taylor provided arms and other support to rebels with the Revolutionary United Front in return for "blood diamonds." Those rebels were found to have committed numerous atrocities against civilians, including keeping sex slaves and hacking off the limbs of children.

            Q: Why is this case important?

            A: The case was significant because it was the first time since the Second World War that a head of state was prosecuted and convicted. Furthermore, the Special Court for Sierra Leone — the judicial body set up by the government of Sierra Leone and the United Nations — sent a clear message that "international justice will get you if you start fomenting crimes against humanity from another jurisdiction," Mendes said. "That's huge."

            Q: What leaders might be next?

            A: There are many active cases before the International Criminal Court, a permanent tribunal based in The Hague, Netherlands and formed in July 2002. The most prominent figure being tried at the moment is former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo on four counts of crimes against humanity.

            The ICC has issued an arrest warrant against another head of state, Omar al-Bashir, the president of Sudan. He is accused of war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide committed in Darfur.

            There is also a warrant for the arrest of Saif al-Islam, son of former Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, for alleged crimes against humanity. However, Libya has so far refused to surrender him because it wants to try him in that country.

            In 2005, a warrant was issued for Joseph Kony, head of the Lord's Resistance Army in Uganda. He is accused of a pattern of "brutalization against civilians."

            Outside of the ICC, there are two ongoing trials before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, involving Ratko Mladic, the former Bosnian Serb military leader, and Radovan Karadzic, the former Bosnian Serb leader.

            Q: What about Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe and Bashar Assad of Syria? Aren't they accused of atrocities?

            A: Generally, the ICC can only open cases against people in countries that are members. There are 121 members; Zimbabwe and Syria are not among them.

            However, the ICC can open investigations into non-member countries if it gets a referral from the United Nations Security Council. This is what happened in the cases of Libya and Sudan.

            Oosterveld said it wouldn't surprise her if the Security Council eventually makes such a referral in the case of Syria, especially if mass killings — such as the recent massacre in Houla — continue and efforts by special envoy Kofi Annan to strike a ceasefire do not succeed.

            Mendes agreed, saying that even Syria's ally on the Security Council, Russia, may be compelled to go along with a referral.

            Q: Some arrest warrants were issued by the ICC years ago but nothing has come of them. Why?

            It is true that the ICC does not have its own police force to go after people with warrants against them. But Oosterveld said one weapon the ICC does have at its disposal is convincing other states to "tighten the noose" around a wanted leader by preventing that leader from crossing into their borders. Under ICC regulations, member countries are obligated to arrest a leader who is the subject of a warrant.

            But Mendes noted that not all countries have complied. Sudan's al-Bashir, for instance, has freely travelled to ICC-member countries, such as Chad and Kenya.

            Q: Let's say al-Bashir or al-Assad are arrested. What kind of a trial might one expect?

            It's possible they would try to stall the process for as long as possible, in the same way that former Yugoslav president Slobodan Milosevic did up until his death in 2006, Mendes said.

            Prosecutors might have an easier time gathering evidence against al-Assad given the large volumes of video and other evidence that have come out of Syria in the recent past. "That stuff will be pretty damning," Mendes said.

            If those leaders insist they had no connection to atrocities, the ICC's chief prosecutor, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, likely would argue that the leader is still criminally responsible even if the crime was committed through another person, Mendes said. Ocampo, he said, likes to use the analogy of a clockmaker who devises a bomb, sets the timer and walks away just before it blows — the clockmaker sets everything in motion right up until the final deadly act.

            Oosterveld said leaders often are careful to avoid leaving behind any evidence of direct orders. The challenge for prosecutors is to somehow show that they were still intimately involved in a "common plan." That's what happened in the case of Taylor, who insisted he was a "peacemaker," she said.

            Q: After 10 years in existence, is the ICC effective?

            A: While the ICC has convicted only one person in the past 10 years, Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga, the establishment of the ICC still marks a major milestone in international justice, on the same level as the impact of the Magna Carta, Mendes said.

            "For the first time in human history the majority of the global community has said we're willing to abide by the rule of law even if it reaches to the highest levels of our own leadership," he said. "It's a promise to combat impunity wherever and whenever it occurs, even within our own borders."

            Oosterveld agreed. While the ICC has had growing pains, it has an active docket and is breaking new ground, she said. In the past wars were fought between two armies over land. Today's wars are much more complex, involving battles over resources and not just power.

            The fact that the international community is prosecuting actors involved in these complex cases represents a "huge step" for international justice.

            "The world is beginning to say enough is enough."

            Dquan@...

            Twitter.com/dougquan

            © Copyright (c) Postmedia News



            On Jun 2, 2012, at 10:49 AM, "Steven" <steventt444@...> wrote:


            Sheldan's messages are getting very old. Soon, soon, soon, soon, and more soon. Soon never comes. Can't believe any of it anymore. I have not heard of even one arrest of the mass murdering criminals that run this planet. How come there is never any real proof that comes along with the B.S. Show me one, just one bit of proof. I rest my case.
            --- In PAO_Connection@yahoogroups.com, "happy_buddha_au" <happy_buddha_au@...> wrote:

            Any news from  Sheldon if this still stands? It's the first of June and no arrests





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