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RE: [OutlandsDance] Hole in the Wall

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  • Swashbuckler
    Hi there: Rebekah beat me to the punch. I couldn t find my Country Dance book - it s probably still packed after a class. I do have piles of notes, though,
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 28, 2000
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      Hi there:

      Rebekah beat me to the punch. I couldn't find my Country Dance book -
      it's probably still packed after a class. I do have piles of notes, though,
      and the dates and sources agree with Rebekah. I have at least one CD,
      "Popular Masterpieces of the Baroque" from the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra
      (Toronto, Canada), that includes Purcell's Hornpipe No. 8 from Abdelazar,
      [etc.].

      The first edition of Playford, "The English Dancing Master", was
      published in 1651. Though out of period by most calculations, this edition
      is usually embraced by the SCA for four reasons: it purports to record the
      old way of doing dances, it is readily available (in any good book store and
      in English, too), it is one of the few historical records of English
      dancing, and we've always had it. Eighteen later editions (titled "The
      Dancing Master" with additional dances) were published through 1728, along
      with two additional volumes (with several editions) beginning in 1710.

      Today, a well read SCA researcher may move beyond Playford. The dances
      were likely 10 - 20, not 50 years old. We have two other period sources for
      English dances (the Inns of Court Mss and Gresley). Many other sources are
      available, especially through the web. We don't _have_ to perpetuate bad
      research. The later editions of Playford move farther from period and
      really shouldn't be used in the SCA. Hole in the Wall is in this group.
      The dances are done by other groups, however (Regency, English Country, and
      Contradance groups plus other SCA groups), so they are hard to leave behind.

      Lest I be accused of being the Authenticity Police(tm), I'd rather see
      some out of period dances then no dancing at all. I'd prefer to see period
      dances, so I usually choose not to participate in Hole in the Head at SCA
      events. I'm willing to do my part to teach fun alternatives. I try to lead
      by example, never by force.

      Arwen reminds me that I used the wrong word for "reels." If John Hertz
      were here, he'd be tempted to beat me about the ears. Fortunately, he is a
      fine Regency gentleman and would never do such a thing. (John teaches Hole
      in the Wall and others at Regency dances.)

      Keith McClune a.k.a.
      Guillaume de Gonzac
      Caerthen co-dance master
      (formerly trained in Carolingia)

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Dianne Phelan [mailto:dphelan@...]

      Keith / Guillaume says:
      > Hole in the Wall comes to us from late 17th century (1698?) and early
      > 18th century editions of Playford. The music was first published as a
      > Purcell hornpipe in the early to mid 1690's. I will look up more details
      > when I get home

      Arwen says:
      > I'm remembering 1694 or 1696.

      The Complete Country Dance Tunes from Playford's Dancing Master,
      ed. Jeremy Barlow, lists the tune and dance Hole in the Wall
      as first appearing in part 2, 2nd ed 1698, 9B.

      The Purcell hornpipe is from the play Abdelazar, or the Moor's Revenge,
      1695, according to Purcell, Playford, and the English Country Dance,
      vol.2 the music, by Christine Helwig and Marshall Barron. How come I've
      never noticed this implies there's a "vol.1 the dances"???
      Time to prowl the CDSS site....yup, it's there.

      On the CDSS site, I notice there's a new (9/22) online compendium
      of all the Playford dancing master versions in a searchable database
      with facsimiles of unique versions of the dances. *Very* nifty. Go to
      http://www.cdss.org/publications/ and click the On-Line Publications item.

      --Rebekah of Lizard's Nest
      (a former dance mistress of al-Barran)
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