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The miracle-working icon of the Mother of God "Tikhvinsk aya" will visit St. Nicholas Cathedral

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  • Fr. John-Brian
    TODAY S NEWS from http://www.3saints.com The miracle-working icon of the Mother of God “Tikhvinskaya” will visit St. Nicholas Cathedral on March 12-14,
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 5, 2004
      TODAY'S NEWS from http://www.3saints.com

      The miracle-working icon of the Mother of God “Tikhvinskaya” will visit St.
      Nicholas Cathedral on March 12-14, 2004.
      www.russianchurchusa.org - Dear Brothers and Sisters!
      With the blessing of His Holiness Patriarch ALEXY the miracle-working icon
      of the Mother of God “Tikhvinskaya” will visit St. Nicholas Cathedral on
      March 12-14, 2004.

      This visit will end its 55 years of stay in the United States. St. Nicholas
      Cathedral will become the last Russian Orthodox church where the
      wonder-working icon will be presented for veneration before she departs for
      Russia.

      While at St. Nicholas Cathedral, the twenty-four-hour prayer services will
      be offered before this holy and ancient image of the Mother of God. The
      commemoration slips to be read during these services could be either ordered
      at the Cathedral or mailed. Donation for one commemoration slip is $100.

      The clergy, willing to serve molebens before the holy icon, should call:
      212-996-6638.

      According to ancient tradition, the wonderworking icon of Tikhvin is one of
      several painted by St. Luke the Evangelist. The icon was taken from
      Jerusalem to Constantinople in the fifth century, where it was enshrined in
      the Church of Blachernae, which was built especially for this purpose.

      In 1383, seventy years before the fall of Constantinople at the hands of the
      Turks, fishermen on Lake Ladoga in the principality of Novgorod the Great
      witnessed the icon miraculously hovering over the lake's waters amidst a
      radiant light. Shortly after its miraculous appearance, the icon was
      discovered in several neighboring towns, including the village of
      Motchenitsy on the bank of the Tikhvinka River, before it finally appeared
      near the town of Tikhvin. A wooden church dedicated to the Dormition of the
      Theotokos was built on the site of the icon's final resting place.

      In 1560, by order of Tsar Ivan the Terrible, a men's monastery was
      established near the church and enclosed with a stone wall. Over the
      centuries, the icon's fame spread far and wide. Copies of the wonderworking
      icon began to adorn churches throughout the land. Some of these copies also
      proved to be sources of miracles, and it was not uncommon to find the
      faithful praying before the icon to seek healing for children who were ill.

      During the World War II German occupation, the Nazis removed the icon from
      the Tikhvin Monastery, from where it was taken to Pskov and subsequently to
      Riga, Latvia. When the city was evacuated, Bishop John [Garklavs] of Riga,
      in whose care the icon was placed, took the icon to Bavaria, where it was
      venerated by Orthodox faithful who had been displaced because of the war.

      While Soviet agents had spotted the icon, Bishop John was permitted to take
      the icon to the United States in 1949, where it stayed at the Chicago
      cathedral up until now. In 2003 the Orthodox Churches of Russia and the
      United States have reached the agreement to return the icon to its
      Motherland.
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