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Russian Church and State celebrate paratroopers

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  • Rev Fr John Brian
    Ecumenical News International News Highlights 04 August 2006 Russian Church and State celebrate paratroopers Moscow (ENI). Russia s Airborne Forces Day is
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 4, 2006
      Ecumenical News International News Highlights
      04 August 2006


      Russian Church and State celebrate paratroopers

      Moscow (ENI). Russia's Airborne Forces Day is often feared as an occasion
      when paratroopers get drunk and harass passers-by. This year, however, the
      military decided to stress its cooperation with the Russian Orthodox Church
      by marking the event with another holiday that fell on the same day, the
      Feast Day of the Old Testament Prophet Elijah, or Ilya in Russian. In
      Moscow, paratroopers participated in a religious procession with priests,
      crosses, icons and religious banners that culminated at a service on Red
      Square to mark the holiday. The service was followed by a demonstration of
      paratroopers' skills and prowess, and a pop concert [297 words, ENI-06-0619]




      ENI Online - www.eni.ch
    • Bill Samsonoff
      http://www.speroforum.com/site/article.asp?id=4831&t=Russian+Church+and+State+celebrate+paratroopers Russian Church and State celebrate paratroopers In Moscow,
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 8, 2006
        http://www.speroforum.com/site/article.asp?id=4831&t=Russian+Church+and+State+celebrate+paratroopers

        Russian Church and State celebrate paratroopers
        In Moscow, paratroopers participated in a religious procession with
        priests, crosses, icons and religious banners that began at an historic
        church named after St Ilya

        Tuesday, August 08, 2006
        by ENI

        Russia's Airborne Forces Day is often feared as an occasion when
        paratroopers get drunk and harass passers-by. This year, however, the
        military decided to stress its cooperation with the Russian Orthodox Church
        by marking the event with another holiday that fell on the same day, the
        Feast Day of the Old Testament Prophet Elijah, or Ilya in Russian.

        In Moscow, paratroopers participated in a religious procession with
        priests, crosses, icons and religious banners that began at an historic
        church named after St Ilya, and culminated at a service on Red Square to
        mark the 2 August holiday. The service was followed by a demonstration of
        paratroopers' skills and prowess, and a pop concert

        "The Holy Prophet of God, Ilya, is the heavenly intercessor of the Airborne
        Forces," said Russian Orthodox Patriarch Alexei II in a written address to
        participants. The Moscow Patriarchate's press service reported that he was
        out of town, but the event had his blessing and that of the Kremlin, the
        centre of power for the Russian government.

        The church from which the procession started is famous for ringing the
        bells that raised the Russian people against 17th-century Polish occupiers.
        Russia's military and the Orthodox church have grown increasingly close in
        recent years. A patriarchate department is devoted to cooperation with the
        military. A privately-funded Orthodox television channel called Spas, or
        Saviour, working closely with the patriarchate department broadcasts
        documentaries and programmes that equate Orthodox values with a powerful
        military.

        Russian police remained on high alert to control excessive behaviour of
        drunk and rowdy paratroopers. Still, among those injured by celebrating
        paratroopers across Russia on 2 August were an Italian tourist and a
        Peruvian who was mistaken for a Chechen.

        Article written by Sophia Kishkovsky
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