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Armenian priest assaulted by Yeshiva students

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  • Fr. John-Brian
    Armenian priest assaulted by Yeshiva students Etgar Lefkovits, THE JERUSALEM POST Jan. 6, 2005 An Armenian priest was assaulted by four yeshiva students in
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 7, 2005
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      Armenian priest assaulted by Yeshiva students
      Etgar Lefkovits, THE JERUSALEM POST Jan. 6, 2005

      An Armenian priest was assaulted by four yeshiva students in the Old City of
      Jerusalem Thursday afternoon, in the second such attack in the last three
      months, police said.
      The altercation began when one of the yeshiva students spat on the priest,
      Father Avedis, in front of the Armenian Monastery where he lives in the
      Armenian Quarter, the priest said.
      The Jewish assailant refused to go to police with the priest, and the two
      got into a scuffle.
      Meanwhile, a few more yeshiva students came by, and got into a heated
      argument with the priest over who had attacked whom, the priest said.
      A Foreign Ministry official, accompanied by an Israeli security guard, who
      was passing by, came to the aid of the priest, and summoned police.
      The four haredi suspects subsequently scuffled with the security guard, who
      tried to detain them before police arrived. The four were subsequently
      placed under arrest and will be remanded in a Jerusalem court on Friday
      morning.
      The priest was not hurt in the incident.
      The assault on the priest was condemned by the New York-based
      Anti-Defamation League, and, later, by Jerusalem Mayor Uri Lupolianski.
      "This kind of behavior is outrageous, inappropriate and goes against all
      Jewish teachings, said Laura Kam Issacharoff, the co-director of the ADL's
      Israel Office.
      She added that such attacks are not as random as they seem, and that
      Jerusalem yeshiva students must be taught respect and tolerance of others.
      Later Thursday evening, Lupolianski called the attack a "despicable act"
      which is "likely to harm the delicate relations that exist in Jerusalem."
      In a statement, he added that "the Jewish people, which was subject to
      centuries of persecution abroad, should be the first to show tolerance and
      moderation to others."
      In October, a yeshiva student spat at a Sunday morning procession of
      Armenian clergymen in Jerusalem's Old City and then scuffled with a priest.
      He later apologized.



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