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Russian Orthodox Church still doubts authenticity of Russian royal family remains

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  • Bill Samsonoff
    http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=10702 09 August 2013, 14:26 Russian Orthodox Church still doubts authenticity of Russian royal family remains
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 9, 2013
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      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=10702

      09 August 2013, 14:26
      Russian Orthodox Church still doubts authenticity of Russian royal
      family remains

      Moscow, August 9, Interfax - The head of the Moscow Patriarchate
      Department for Church and Society Relations Archpriest Vsevolod Chaplin
      has said that the Russian Orthodox Church still has doubts regarding
      secular experts' conclusions that the human remains found near the city
      of Yekaterinburg belonged to the Russian Imperial Family members.

      "In my opinion, a very wide range of competent experts, not necessarily
      just Orthodox experts, should be allowed to study the discovered
      remains," Father Vsevolod said.

      It is important both to compare the DNA of some individual fragment with
      the DNA of the remains of other Imperial Family members, assess the
      wholeness of the skeletons, establish whether or not all of the found
      human remains have the same DNA and confirm the presence of former
      injuries, for example the injury that was sustained by Tsar Nicholas II
      during his trip to Japan when he was the heir to the Russian throne, the
      archpriest said.

      There is also a need to compare different theories describing how the
      bodies were disposed of and buried, he said.

      Eleven people, including members of the Russian Imperial Family and
      people from their entourage, were shot at the Urals regional council
      presidium's order in the early hours of July 17, 1918.

      A grave with nine bodies was found on Staraya Koptyakovskaya Road near
      Yekaterinburg in July 1991. The remains were identified as those of
      Emperor Nicholas II, his 46-year-old wife Alexandra Fyodorovna, their
      daughters Olga, 22, Tatyana, 21, and Anastasia, 17, and their servants
      Yevgeny Botkin, 53, Anna Demidova, 40, Aloizy Trupp, 62, and Ivan
      Kharitonov, 48.

      The remains of two more people were discovered during archaeological
      excavation works 70 kilometers south of the first grave on July 26,
      2007. The remains have still not been buried, but numerous expert
      analyses indicate that the remains were most likely those of Crown
      Prince Alexey and his sister Maria.

      The Investigative Committee said in January 2011 that it had completed
      an investigation into the death of Nicholas II, his family members and
      entourage and closed the criminal case.

      The Russian Orthodox Church has still not recognized the remains
      interred in Peter and Paul Cathedral as those of Nicholas II and his
      family members and entourage, claiming that it was not convinced by the
      proof of their authenticity that was presented.

      The House of Romanov head, Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna, will
      recognize the remains buried at the St. Peter and Paul Cathedral in St.
      Petersburg as those of the royal family, if the Russian Orthodox Church
      says they are authentic, the House of Romanov spokesman Alexander
      Zakatov told Interfax.
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